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INJIINTM 




f^CT§ ^|T6URE§ ForThe [LeCTOR^op(^NADA. 

£33asd as a SuppUn^aat ia 




Montreal. 



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ATTENTION IS INVITED BY THE 



London & Lancashire 



LIFE ASSURANCE COiVlPANY. 



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A provision for dependent ones 
in the event of death, or for old 
age, may best be secured tlirouyh 
the instrumentality of Life In- 
surance. 



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The London & Lancashire Life 
has a Canadian experience of 
upwards of a quarter of a cen- 
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desirable plans of Assurance. 
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wide and Nonforfeitable. Wo- 
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AGENCIES THROUGHOUT CANADA. 
MEAD OF-RICE, ----- IV10IMXRE Al_. 

DIRECTORS: 

R. B. ANGUS, Esq.. A T PATERSON. Esq.. 

H. STIKEMAN, Esq.. EDSON L. PEASE. Esq. 

The Right Honorable LORD STRATHCONA and MOUNT ROYAL. 

Chairman Canadian Board. 



J. L. Kerr, asst. manager. 



B. HAL BROWN, General Manager. 



^ 1599 ^ 



a"HE>- 



PEOPLES 



•^■ALMHNHC'^ 



A COMPILATION OF FACTS AND FIGURES 



FOR THE CONSIDERATION OF THE 



ELECTORS OF CMNADH 



* > » < -»- 



Issued as a Supplement to . . . 

THE GAZETTE 



MONTREAL. 



With the Compliments of the Publishers 



^ 1599 






Ml 






OF" CANADA. 



Head Office: Wellington and Scott Sts., TORONTO, Ont, 



EXECUTIVE officers: 

H. P. DWIGHT, President and General Manager. 

ADAM BROWN, Vice-President. 

GEO. D. PERRY, Secretary and Auditor. 

ARTHUR COX, Treasurer and Supt. of Supplies. 

BOARD OF directors: 

H. P. DWIGHT, Toronto, Ont. 

ADAM BROWX, .... Hamilton, Ont. 

HON. WM. McDOUGALL, C.B., - - Ottawa, Ont. 

CHAS. A. TINKER, . . . . New York, N.Y. 

RICHARD FULLER, .... Hamilton, Ont. 

JAMES HEDLEY, .... Toronto Ont. 

A. S IRVING, Toronto, Ont. 

W. C. MATTHEWS, .... Toronto, Ont. 

H. N. BAIRD, Toronto, Out. 

superintendents : 

N. W. BETHUNE, Ottawa. A R. PORTE, Ogdenshurg, N.Y, I 

EDWIN POPE, Quebec. LYMAN DWIGHT, Winnipeg. 

R. F. EASSON, Superintendent of Reports, Toronto. 
A. B. SMITH, Superintendent of Construction and Repairs, Toronto. 



TO THE PUBLIC. 



..^^N presenting the ninth edition of the 

^1^^ PEOPLE'S ALMANAC, the pubUshers 

^^^M-' know from the favor accorded to the 

•^ previous editions, that it v^ill meet 

popular approval. 

Those w^ho follow public events will find in 
its pages useful records of the chief events of 
the past year, particularly those affecting Cana- 
dian interests. 

In presentina the issue of 1899 to the 
readers of THE GAZETTE, the publishers 
desire to wish them a Happy New Year. 



HOVB SCOTIII STEEL M FOBSE CO. 

i_iivii"rE:D. 
NEW GLASGOW, Nova Scotia. 




ONLY STEEL WORKS IN CANADR. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Hammered and Rolled Steel, 

MADE BY THE 

SIEMENS-MARTIN (ouen hearth) PROCESS. 



KCLIPSES IN 1899. 



There willbe three Eclipses of the Sun and two of the Moon in the year 1899. 

I.— A Partial Kclipse of the Sun January 11; invisible here; but visible to 
the extreme North-western portion of Alaska, and to the greater portion of the 
North Pacific Ocean. 

n.— A Partial Eclipse of the Sun. Tune 8; not visible here; but 'visible to 
Great Britain, France, Germany, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and all the Polar 
Regions. 

III.— A Total Eclipse of the Moon June 22-23 ; invisible here ; visible gen- 
erally :— the beginning in the Eastern portions of Asia and throughout the 
Pacific Ocean, and the Western portions of North America ; and the end, in 
Asia, the middle and Western Pacific Ocean, and the Eastern portions of Africa. 

IV.— An Annular Eclipse of the Sun ; December 2 ; not visible here ; visible 
to a portion of New Zealand, the extreme South Western part of Australia, and 
to a great portion of the South Pacific and Indian Oceans. The line of Annulus 
passes almost exactly through the South Pole. 

v.— A Partial Eclipse of the Moon December 16. 

Occurring here as follows : 

Eastern Standard Time. 
D. H. M. 

Moon enters penumbra IG 5 33 p. m. 

Moon enters shadow 10 6 45 '• 

Middle of Eclipse Hi 8 26 " 

Moou leaves shadow ■. . .... 16 10 7 " 

Moon leaves penumbra Ifi 11 19 " 

First contact ot >hadow 66 degrees from Xorth point of the Moon's limb toward the East. 

Magnitude of Eclipse = 0. 996 (JMoon's diameter = 1.0). 



THE PLANKTS DURINO 1899. 

Venus will be a morning star until September 16, and evening star the rest of the year. 

Mars is morning stur until .January 18, and then evening star the rest of the year, 

Jupiter begins as morning star and continues as such till April 25, then evening star to November 13, 

and then morning star to the end of the year. 
Saturn is morning star until June 11, then evening star till December 18, then morning star to end 

of year. 
Mercury will be a morning star about January 11. M.ay 10, September 5 and December 25, and 

evening about March 24, July 22 and November 16. 



CHURCH FESTIVALS AND HOLIDAYS. 



New Year's Day Jan. 1 

Epiphany " 6 

Septuagisima " 29 

Quinquagesvm.a— Shrove Sunday Feb. 12 

Ash Wednesday " 15 

(Quadragesima " 19 

St. I) I vid's Day Mar. 1 

St. I'atrick's Day " 17 

Annunciation — Lady Day " 25 

Palm Sunday " 26 

Good Frid.ay " 31 

Easter Sunday ...April 2 

Easter Monday '• 3 

Low Sunday " 9 

St. George's Day " 23 

Rogation Sunday ^lay 7 

Ascension Day— Holy Thursday " 11 



Pentecost — Whit Sunday May 

Queen's Birthday '' 

Trinity Sunday " 

Corpus Christi June 

Accession of Queen Victoria " 

St. Jean Baptiste Day '' 

St. Peter and St. Paul's Day " 

Dominion Day July 

Labor Day Sept. 

^Michaelmas . "" 

All Saints Dav Nov. 

Prince of Wales Birthday " 

St. Andrew's Day " 

First Sunday in Advent Dec. 

Conception " 

St. Thomas Day '' 

Christmas " 



LEGAL AND BANK HOLIDAYS. 

For the- Dominion — New Year's Day, January 1 : Good Friday. March 31 ; Easter Monday, 
April 3 ; Queen's Birthday, May 24 ; Dominion Day, July 1 ; Labor Day, September 4 ; Christmas, 
December 25. 

Forth' Province nf Qwher,—A\l the above, and Epiphany, January 6 ;■; Ascension, May 11; 
All Saints' Day, November 1; Conception. December 8. 



WM. FOSTER BROWN, 



BOOKSELLER, PUBLISHER, | 
AND PERIODICAL AGENT , 

Episcopal Prayer Books, Hymns, Ancient and 
Modern, of the Finest Binding 

Scientific WorKs, BccKs on Eleetriciti, Etc. 



2323 St. Catherine Street, 

BELL TELEPHONE 3641. IVl O l\[ I R E A L. 

Municipal Debentures, Government and Provincial Bonds, 
Railway and Other Investment Securities 

BOUGHT, SOLD OR NEGOTIATED 

R. WILSON-SMITH, 

^T.loT.::-^ \ 151 St. Janj^s Str^^t, Montreal. 

Investment Securities Snitable for Binks, Trust Estates, Insurance 
Companies, Permanent Investment or Deposit with Canadian Government. 

MEMBER OF THE MONTREAL STOCK EXCHANGE. 



THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 



1st Month. 



JANUARY, 1899. 



31 Days. 



>.-2 


>^ ' 


s « 


^ o 




"^ 







1 


srsr. 1 


2 


MON. 1 


•A 


TUKS. 


4 


Wki). 


fi 


Thur. 


6 


Frid. 


7 


Satur. 


8 


SlIX. ] 


9 


Mox 


10 


TUF.S. 


11 


Wki). 


12 


Thiir. 


13 


Frh> I 


14 


StTUR. 


15 


snx. 


16 


Mox. 


17 


'I'UKS. ■ 


IH 


WkD. ! 


19 


Thur 


20 


Frid. 


21 


Satcr. 


22 


SIX. 


23 


Mox. i 


24 


TUFS. 


25 


Wki). : 


26 


TaiR. 


27 


Fkid. 


2H 


>ATrR 


•W 


SUN. 1 


■W 


Mox. t 


31 


Ti:e.<«. ' 



Weathkr Probabii.itiks 



For M'lntrcol.Quijbuc and jFor Toronto oncl Prov- 
TCgioiis of St. Lawrence, lince of Ontario, lyinz on I 
and Ottawa Rivers. and bet. the Great Lakes. I 



Sun Sun Moon 
Kiseg. Sets. Rises. 



Milder. Variable. 
Rough. Stormy. 
ClcHr and cold. 
Frosty. Fair- 
Clouds. 
Unsettled. 
Kisinal. gloomy day- 
Heavy ioe. 
Colder. Snow- 
(Jeneral snow. 
Cold day. 
Clouds. 
Threatening. 
Kain and snow. 
Change. 
Fair, 

Cloudy. Snow. 
Heavy snow. 
Cloudy. 
Changeable. 
Milder. 

Dark, cloudy day. 
Colder. Windy. 
Fair. 
Showers. 
Unsettled. 
Milder. 
Change. 
Heavy log. 
Cloudy. 
Frosty. Clearing. 



I Sun 
Kises. 

hm. 

7 40 
7 40 
7 40 
7 40 
7 40 
7 40 
7 40 
7 39 
7 39 
7 39 
7 38 
7 38 
7 38 
7 37 
7 37 
7 :ifi 
7 35 
7 34 
7 34 
7 33 
7 32 
7 31 
7 30 
7 29 
7 28 
7 27 
7 2fi 
7 25 
7 24 
7 21 
7 22 



Sun 

Sits. 



.Moon 
Rises. 



h.iD. 
4 27 
4 28 
4 29 
4 .30 
4 31 
4 -32 
4 Si 
4 34 
4 35 
4 36 
4 37 
4 38 
4 .39 
4 41 
4 42 
4 43 
4 45 
4 46 
4 t7 
4 49 
4 51 
4 52 
4 53 
4 55 
4 56 
4 .58 

4 59 

5 00 
5 02 
5 03 
5 05 



h.m. 

9 21 

10 21 

11 28 ■ 
morn. 

39 

1 52 

3 05 

4 2') 

5 31 

6 31 

7 28 
sets. 

7 14 

8 37 

9 56 
11 09 
morn, 

23 

1 :H 

2 41 

3 42 

4 40 

5 .30 

6 12 
6 48 

rises. 

6 06 

7 11 

8 18 

9 19 

10 27 



h.m. 


h.m. 


7 M 


4 :m 


7 34 


4:i5 


7 34 


4 .36 


7.34 


4 37 


7 34 


4 ;« 


7 34 


4 39 


7 34 


4 40 


7 34 


4 41 


7 33 


4 42 


7 :i3 


4 43 


7 33 


4 44 


7 .33 


4 45 


7 32 


4 46 


7 32 


4 47 


7 .31 


4 48 


7 31 


4 49 


7 .30 


4 51 


7 29 


4 .52 


7 29 


4 53 


7 28 


4 54 


7 27 


4 55 


7 26 


4 57 


7 26 


4 58 


7 25 


4 59 


7 24 


5 (M) 


7 2;3 


5 02 


7 22 


5 04 


7 21 


5 05 


7 20 


5 06 


7 19 


508 


7 18 


5 1'^ 



b m. 

« 2i 

10 22 

11 26 
morn. 

.35 

1 47 

2 5< 

4 13 

5 23 

6 27 

7 21 

SPtS. 

7 18 

8 .39 

9 55 
11 06 
morn. 

19 

1 i8 

2 3t 

3 35 

4 33 

5 22 
fi 05 

6 42 
rises. 

6 M 

7 13 

8 '8 

9 17 
10 24 



-T--T3 


yc- 




= ^■'i = 


s» 


= -£,Si 4. 




2 


^c^^ 






-0 


'. * 






■1 


> 




. 


03 






X 






ai 






CJGC"^J^ , Cn 



-C13 — 

EEB 

= (B » 
? <? < 



►•J — — 


cc 


s-.aci-'.tt 






H 






'^=■=■'3 


2 


i; jjjnrsi 


St 






= c a 5 


3 






« = 5 o 


>- 


.' r .< < 


jS 



--=■=■ 2 

oococnro , r5 

53 3 B j I 

® S 2 o £ 



A BROKEN PLEDGE 



L-THE DEBTS. 

The platform of the Liberal Party, on which it ran the election campaign of 
1890, was adopted at the Liberal Convention at Ottawa on June :i(l and 21, l^tKi. 
It declared for economy, in the following terms : 

" We cannot but view with alarm the large increase of the public debt and 
of the controllable annual expenditure of the Dominion and the coii.-<equent 
undue ta.xation of the people under the governments that have lieen continuously 
in power .'-ince 1.S78, and we demand the strictest economy in the administration 
of the government of the country." 

The Liberal Government came into power on the 13th day of July, 1S96, 
twelve days after the ending of the fiscal year 18it5-96. Here is the record of the 
debt since that date : 

GROSS. NKT. 

At June m, 189(5 § 325,717,.537 § 2."iS,497,4:« 

'• .SO, 1897 3:^2,530,131 2(il,o38.-296 

" 30, 1898 338.370,254 2r>l,08G.3.57 

The leaders of the i>arty which in 18S)3 " viewed with alarm" the increase of 
the debt, increased the gross debt in two years by .sl2,ti.i2,717, and the net debt by 
.'§.5,r)S,'^,924. Tliey broke the party's pledge. 



^ 



By Appointment Furriers to tier Haiesty the Queen. 



6. R. RENFREW & CO. 

3 KiDS 3t., East, 33 & 37 BGadc St., 

TORONTO. QUEBEC. 



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Fir^e RUssiari ar^d Hudsori's Bay Sables always or^ biar^d. 

Exclusive design^s iri Ladies' Sealskiri ar^d Persia^ Lanqb 
Coats aqd Wraps. 

WRITE FOR PATTERN BOOK AND PRICE LIST. 



Available Assets : Aiimial Income : 

$59,952,465. $10,749,748. 

THE 

Liverpool and London and Globe 

INSURANCE COMPANY 



FIRE * LIFE 



CANADIAN BOARD OP DIRECTORS 

Edmoiid J. Barbeau, Esq., Chahman. 
W. J. Buchanan, Esq., Deputy Chairman. 
A. F. Gault, Esq. S. Finloy, Esq. E. S. Clouston, Esq. 

HEAD OFFICE-CANADA BRANCH 

16 Place d'Aripcs, Cor. St. JarpeS, MONTREAL. 

G F. C SMITH, Chief Agent for Canada 

The patronage of the insuriui;- publie is solicited. 

Ao-encies established ihroHijhout the Dominion. 



THPJ PEOPLES ALMANAC 



2nd Month. 



FEBRUARY, 1899. 



28 D ays 



>.-5 


^■i 


a§ 


P;^ 


S 


" 


1 


Wkd. 


2 


I'hur. 


•A 


Frii). 


4 


8at. 


5 


SIJ.V. 


fi 


MoN. 


7 


TUKS. 


8 


Wki). 


9 


Thur. 


10 


Frii). 


11 


Sat. 


1? 


SUN. 


13 


MON. 


U 


TuKS. 


].i 


Wkd. i 


Ifi 


Thcr. , 


17 


Fkii). ; 


18 


Sat. ! 


19 


SVS. 


20 


Ml)N- 


•21 


TuKS. 


22 


WKt). 


■£i 


Thur. 


U 


Frio, i 


'I'y 


Sat. 


26 


SUN. 


27 


MUN. 1 


2.S 


I'UKS. 



Weather Probabilities- 



Cold day. 
Raw, windy day- 
Variable- 
Stormy. 

S<iually. Rough, 
Very wituly. 
High winds. Cold. 
Windy day. 
Changeable. 
Deep snow. 
General sncSws, 
Milder. 
Pleasant. 
Showers. 
Snow storms. 
Change. 
Clearing. 
Pleasant day. 
Cloudy. 

Sleet and snow. 
Clouds. 
Storm period. 
Variab e. 
Fnir. 

R;iiii and snow. 
Threatening. 
Unsettled. 
Bad day. 



Kor Muntreal.t 


uebcc and) 


rcKioiis lit St 


l.awrent-e 


and Ottawa R 


Vt-I8. 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Rises 


Sets. 


Rises. 


h.m. 


h.m. 


h.m. 


; 7 21 


5 07 


11 37 


i 7 20 


5 08 


morn. 


7 19 


5 09 


48 


7 18 


5 n 


2 01 


7 17 


5 12 


3 10 


7 16 


5 14 


4 16 


7 U 


5 15 


5 12 


7 13 


5 17 


5 58 


7 12 


5 18 


6 33 


7 10 


5 20 


sets. 


7 09 


5 21 


7 30 


7 08 


5 22 


8 42 


7 06 


5 24 


10 01 


7 05 


5 25 


11 17 


7 03 


5 27 


morn. 


7 01 


5 28 


27 


7 00 


5 30 


1 33 


6 58 


4 31 


2 32 


6 56 


5 32 


3 26 


6 54 


5 34 


4 10 


6 52 


5 35 


4 60 


6 51 


5 37 


5 21 


6 49 


5 38 


f- 47 


6 47 


5 40 


6 08 


B 46 


5 41 


rises. 


6 44 


5 42 


7 09 


6 42 


5 44 


H 18 


6 40 


5 45 


9 28 



For Toronto and Prov- 
ince of Ontario, lyine on 
and bet- the Cireat LaKcs 



Sun 
Rises- 



Sun 

Sets. 



Moon i 
Rises. 1 



h.m. 
17 



7 16 
7 15 
7 14 
7 12 
7 11 
7 10 
7 09 
7 08 
7 06 
7 05 
7 03 
7 02 
7 00 
6 59 
6 58 
6 56 
6 55 
6 53 
6 52 
6 50 
6 49 
6 47 
6 45 
6 43 
6 42 
6 4'i 
6 39j 



h.m. 
5 11 
5 12 
5 14 
5 15 
5 16 
5 18 
5 19 
5 2ij 
5 22 
5 23 
5 24 
5 26 
5 27 
5 29 
5 30 
5 31 
5 33 
5 34 
5 35 
5 37 
5 38 
5 40 
5 Jl 
5 42 
5 44 
5 45 
5.46 
5 47 



h.m. 

11 33 

morn. 

U 42 

1 54 

3 Oi 

4 09 

5 (15 

5 ..j 

6 .iu 
sets. 

7 30 

8 41 

9 58 
11 11 
morn. 

21 

1 26 

2 25 

3 19 

4 03 

4 43 

5 14 

5 42 

6 05 
rises. 

7 08 

8 16 

9 24 



2 5 = 1 
2 2 o S 

V » ! 2 






= = B £3 

2 B 3 5 



to-'-.' 

i.-i ~i o CO 



BbBB 2 
SBB3 I % 



^^ O W 



BS 



A BROKEN PLEDGE 

II— THE EXPENDITURE. 

Ill the resolution of the Ottawa Liberal Conference, quoted on the preceding 
calendar page, the size of the controllable annual expenditure was deplored. 
Hon. ClilTord Sifton, now a member of the Laiirier Liberal Government, in his 
speech supporting the resolution, as reported on pages 107-108 of the Oflicial Record 
of the Conference, said : 

"I wish to call attention to this fact, that, as Liberals, we have the right to 
say we are the exponents of economy. Our opponents do not even pretend to be 
economical ; their principle is to get all the money they can from the people and 

distribute it amongst their friends We trust that the platform of a 

revenue taril!" accompanied by the promise of economy will enable us to send you 
a substantial delegation to the next Parliament of Canada." 

The trust of Mr. Sifton was justified. A substantial delegation— even a 
majority— of Liberals was sent to Parliament. A liiberal Government, came into 
power, but it did not reduce the .expenditure, it expanded it, and made it tiie 
largest in the record, save one year— that of the North West rebellion. Here are 
the figures from the Public Accounts, p. xxxiii, 1897: 

IS!).-) S 38,1:32,00.5 1897 ? .38,:y<1,7.'j9 

189(5 36,949,142 1898 38,699,823 

The Liberal Government broke the Liberal Party's pledge here, too. 



Wall Paper 



If you leant bright, attract he papers 
in the latent styles and coreriuf/s, 
drop 7is a line and we will either 
mail samjjles or send traveller. 



THE WATSON, FOSTER COY (Ltd.) 



ONTARIO ST. EAST. 



Our new factory is one of the largest ^ 

and best equipped on the continent. (^Q lVlONT*REAL. 

FOSTER, MARTIN, GIROUARD & LEMIEUH 

pduoeates, Barristers, Solicitors, e.tq. 

Guardian Assurance 

GEO. G. POSTER. 

J. E. MARTIN. 



D. H. GIROUARD. 



181 St. James Street, Montreal. 

A. LEMIEUX. 



WHITE, OHALLORAN & BUCHANAN, 

Cl^t?ocates, Solicitors an^ Gttorneys, 

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NEW YORK LIFE BUILDING, = iVl O NTRE A L- 

Cummissions for Quebec, Ontario, British Columbia, Nova Scotia, Xew 
Brunswick, Manitoba, New York, Ohio, Vermont and Newfoundland. 

W. .r. WHITE. G. F. O'HALLOKAN. A. W. P. IJUCHAXAX. 

Cable Address, Maemaster, Montreal. 

mAcmRSTER & mnciiENHAH, 

^ducicatcs, iLiiwvistcvis;, etc. 
the: teivirl-E, 

ST. JANIES ST, = MONTREAL. 

Donald Maemaster, Q.C., D.C.L. Faixjuhar S. MacLennan, B.C.L. 

J. P. Laundry, B.C.L. J. Claud Hickson, B.C.L. 



THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 



II 



3rd Month. 



MARCH, 1899. 



31 Days. 



















hH^ 


1 


Wed. 


2 


Thu.. 


3 


Frid. 


4 


Satur. 


ft 


SI'N. 


6 


Mo.v. 


7 


'I'UKS. 


« 


AVki). 


9 


Thuk. 


10 


Frid. 


11 


Ratur. 


12 


sux. 


13 


MoN. 


14 


TUKS. 


15 


Wed. 


16 


'I'hur. 


17 


Frid. 


IS 


Satur. 


19 


!«»U.\. 


•20 


.MoN. 


21 


TcKS. 


2*2 


AVei>. 


2;^ 


Thlr. 


24 


Frid. 


2b 


Satur. 


26 


SIIJM. 


•27 


MoN 


•28 


TUES. 


29 


Wrd. 


'^o 


Thiir. 


:^1 


Ffud. 



Weather Pudbabilities. 



Plensaiit. 

Rain- iSieet. Snow. 

Riormy. 

Disinnl weather. 

Oloud?- 

Change. 

Mnderaiinsr. Fair. 

Ihfrh March winds. 

Stonily. Cold. 

Clear. 

Clear and cold. 

B ustery. Cold. 

Moderating. 

iMild. 

llougli day. 

Sto'iny. March like, 

Snow squalls. 

Clearing. 

Fair day. 

Kain. 

D unp. gloomy times. 

loggy (Jiooiuy. Kuiny. 

Colder. Stormy. 

<;'oiids. 

Fair 

Moderate 

Clouds. Windy. 

Snow. 

Snow storms. 

Cloudy. Damp. 

Soft. Slushy. 



For Muntreai.Qucbec and] 


regions ot St. 


J^awrencc 


and OltBwa Ri 


vers. 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Rises. 


Sets. 


K see. 


h.m. 


h.m. 


h.m. 


t) 39 


5 47 


10 39 , 


i 6 37 


5 48 


11 49 ; 


6 :« 


5 50 


morn. 


6 .33 


5 51 


58 


6.^1 


5 52 


2 04 


1 6 29 


5 53 


3 01 


!6'27 


5 .55 


3 61 


i 6 2fi 


5 56 


4i9 


! 6 24 


5 57 


5 01 


6 22 


5 .59 


5 27 


6 20 


6 OO 


5 49 


6 IS 


6 02 


sets. 


6 16 


6 03 


8 61 


6 14 


6 04 


10 05 


6 12 


6 06 


11 15 


6 10 


6 07 


morn. 


6 09 


6 08 


18 


6 0/ 


6 09 


1 17 


6 05 


6 11 


2 04 


1 6 03 


6 12 


2 47 


1 6 01 


6 13 


3 21 


i 5 59 


6 15' 


3 49 


5 57 


6 16 


4 12 


5 55 


6 17 


4 3J 


5 54 


6 19 


4 51 


5 52 


6 20 


5 15 


i 5 50 


6 21 


rises. 


5 48 


6 23 


8 28 


5 46 


6 24 


9 40 


! 5 44 


6 25 


10 50 


1 ."^ 12 


6 27 


M ."-G 



For Toronto and Prov- r •^•iJZt^ 
ince ot Ontario, lyinK on E.>i <' f 
ai.d bet. the Ureat Lakes —'^^'^ 



Sun 


Run 


Moon 


Kises. 


Sets. 


Kise.*. 


h.m. 


h.m. 


h.m. 


6 37 


5 48 


10 .^3 


6 35 


5 49 


11 42 


6 33 


5 50 


morn. 


6 31 


5 52 


.=M 


6 30 


55 


1 56 


6 28 


5 54 


2 5» 


6 2«i 


5 56 


3 44 


6 24 


5 .57 


4 23 


6 22 


5 58 


4 5*1 


6 21 


5 59 


5 25 


6 19 


6 01 


5 49 


6 17 


6 02 


sets. 


6 15 


6 06 


8 4-^ 


6 14 


6 04 


9 5'.) 


6 12 


6 05 


11 (8 


6 10 


6 07 


morn. 


6 08 


6 08 


11 


6 U6 


6 09 


1 10 


6 05 


6 11 


1 57 


6 03 


6 12 


2 40 


6 01 


6 13 


3 14 


5 59 


6 14 


3 44 


5 57 


6 16 


4 09 


5 56 


6 17 


4 30 


5 54 


6 18 


4 .50 


5 52 


6 IV 


5 15 


5 51 


6 20 


rises. 


5 49 


6 22 


8 23 


5 47 


6 23 


9 33 


5+5 


6 24 


10 4-3 


5 44 


fi 25 


11 49 



1 S c 


—S 


i 


3 s; 5 -I 


y. 






: « 





•v 


, ^ 




z 
>■ 
CO 

IS 






-JOC — Jw 


V 


0.3.0.0. 


H 


*— ' 1— t 


— 


5:=? 3=5^ 


^ 






— 'rs<^ 


W 






BSEB 




n » » 2 
B < < < 


is 



:*- ! S 






p-S"3-3- 



A BROKEN PLEDGE 



in. -TAXATION. 

The undue taxation imposed during the term of the Con.servative Govern- 
ment was another count in the indictment of the Ottawa Conference resolutions. 
A change was included in the pledges of the resolution, as well as in the pro- 
mises of those who applauded it. With its greater debt, and its greater expendi- 
ture, liowever, the Liberal Government found that it needed greater revenue, 
and got it. Here is the record of revenue for four jears, the first two being 
under the Conservative Government, the last two under the Liberals : 



1897 #37,829,778 

1898 ;38,r)f)9,823 



189.-i §a3,978,129 

1896 36,618,.591 

There is an iiure.ise, and not a reductioti, shown here. There is an increase, 
and not a reduction, shown if only the taxation items are taken. The levies for 
customs and excise for four years back, two years Conservative and two years 
Liberal government, thus compare : 



189;") .$ 2."),-146,199 

1890 27,759,'28o 



1897 § 28,049,901 

1898 29,002.801 



The Liberal CJovernment broke the LilK-ral Party's pledge here, too. 



CANADA PAPER CO., Ltd. 

MONTREAL HND TORONTO- 

Springvale, Windsor, and St, Francis Paper Mills. 

Eiver du Loup and St. Eaymond Pulp Mills. 

PAPER AND ENVELOPE MANUFACTURERS 



Railway Manilla, Springvale, 

Windsor Mills, Silver Stream, 

Clear Lake, Clear Lake Linen, 

Thistle Dew Linen, Burmese Bond, 

Ruled and Flat. 



No. 1 PHOTO BOOK, - - - Cream and Tinted. 

BOOK PRINT, - - - - White, Toned and Tinted. 

ENVELOPE PAPERS, - - - White and Tinted. 

COVER PAPERS, .... Ordinary Tints and Antiques- 



Colored Poster Papers, 

News Prints, 

Manilla and Brown Wrappings, 

Window Blind Papers. 



Shipping Tags, Envelopes, Bristol Boards, and all Printers' 
and Bookbinders' requisites. 



PAPER IN THIS ALMANAC MADE BY CANADA PAPER CO. 



THE PEOPLES ALMANAC 



13 



4th Month. 



APRIL, 1899. 



30 Days. 



>.■?. 










fi^ 


1 


Sat. 


2 


SUN. 


3 


MON. 


4 


TUKS. 


5 


Wed. 


H 


Thur. 


7 


Frid. 


8 


Sat. 


9 


SUN. 


10 


MoN. 


11 


TuKS. 


12 


VVkd. 


13 


Thur. 


14 


Krid. 


15 


Sat. 


1H 


KUN. 


17 


MoN. 


18 


TuKS. 


19 


Wed. 


20 


Thur 


21 


Frid. 


22 


Sat. 


23 


SUN. 


24 


MoN. 


as 


TUES. 


2ti 


Wed. 


27 


Thur. 


28 


Frid. 


W 


Sat. 


30 


SUN. 



Wkathkr Prob abilities. 



Stormy day. 

Clouds. 

Showery. 

Colder. 

Fine day. 

Moderate. 

Frosty. Cold. 

Unsettled period. 

Milder. 

Unsettled. 

Clouds. Warmer. 

Thunder Kain. 

Thunder showers. 

Stormy. Cloudy. 

Colder. 

Clear. Mild- 

Stormy. Snow. 

Snow storms. 

Unsettled. Rainy. 

Clouds. 

Variable. 

Clearing. 

Warmer. 

Thunder storm. 

Windy. Squally. 

Fair. 

Warmer. 

Clouds. 

Rain or snow. 

Damp. Foggy. 



Fur .Montreal.Qufbecand For loruntn and Prov- 
regions of St. Lawrence inee of Ontario, lyjn^ on 
and <»itawa Rivers ' " 



Sun Sun 
Rises. Sets. 



h m. 
5 41 
5 39 
5 37 
5 35 
5 33 
5 31 
5 29 
5 k7 
5 25 
5 24 
5 22 
5 kO 
5 18 
5 16 
5 14 
5 12 
5 11 
5 09 
5 07 
5 05 
5 04 
5 02 
5 00 
4 59 
4 57 
4 56 
4 54 
4 53 
4 51 
4 50 



Moon 
Rites. 



Sun Sun 
Rises Sets. 



h.m. 


h.m. 


6 27 


morn. 


6 29 


56 


6 ;^o 


1 46 


6 31 


2 27 


6 32 


3 00 


6 34 


3 28 


6 35 


3 51 


6 36 


4 16 


6 38 


4 43 


6 39 


sets. 


6 40 


8 54 


6 41 


10 01 


6 43 


11 02 


6 44 


11 55 


6 45 


morn. 


6 46 


4' 


6 48 


1 18 


6 49 


1 49 


6 50 


2 15 


6 52 


2 36 


6 53 


2 55 


6 64 


3 18 


6 56 


3 38 


6 57 


3 58 


6 59 


rises. 


7 (10 


8 37 


7 01 


9 47 


7 03 


10 50 


7 04 


11 43 


7 05 


inom. 



lllue Ol \/iiiurio, ij^iii^ ui 

and bet. the Ureal Lakes 



h.m. 

5 42 
5 40 
5 38 
5 37 
5 35 
5 33 
5 31 
5 30 
5 28 
5 26 
5 24 
5 23 
5 21 
5 19 
5 17 
5 16 
5 14 
5 12 
5 10 
5 08 
5 07 
5 05 
5 04 
5 02 
5 00 



h.m. 
6 27 
« 28 
6 29 
6 30 
6 31 
6 32 
6 34 
6 35 
6 36 
6 37 
6 38 
6 40 
6 41 
6 42 
6 4:< 
6 44 
6 45 
6 46 
6 48 
6 49 
6 50 
6 51 
6 53 
6 54 
6 55 
6 56 
6 58 

6 59 

7 00 
7 02 



Moon 
Rises. 

h.m. 

morn. 

-tS 

1 39 

2 20 
2.^5 

3 2.5 

3 49 

4 17 
4 43 
sets. 
K 47 
9 54 

10 55 

11 48 
morn. 

33 

1 11 

1 43 

2 10 
2 29 

2 54 

3 18 

3 39 

4 01 
rises. 

8 80 

9 40 

10 43 

11 "6 
morn. 



§5§g 

a =; 3 3. 



i-i en sc- 
orer o" cr 

t0 4-MCn 

BBBB 
<<BB 



to — •— 



B6EB 

ffi o n s 
.^ < c d 



to ;^ tC m 3 

ro ^ --. c: so 

c = BD 5 

CD ffi ® a . c 



A BROKEN PLEDGE 



IV.— LAWYERS' FEES. 

Where specific charges of wrong-doing were made again.st the Conservative 
Government, accompanied by specific pledges that better things would be shown 
under the Liberals, the result is tlie same as when the charges and the promises 
were general. 

Speaking at Lindsay in the campaign of 1896, Sir Wilfrid Laurier tlius spoke : 

" Take the matter of lawyers' fees— he was very sorry to have to speak dis- 
par.agingly of hiwyers— he was one of them. One of the lawyers in tlie cabinet 
was Sir C. H. Tapper, drawing a salary of $7,000 a year. Sir Hibbert has an 
assistant at .§4,000 a year ; then we had until tlie other dav a solicitor-general, at 
a salary of .f 5,000. 

" Sir, they paj' over $100,0(X) yearly in extra legal fees. This expenditure is 
corrupt and indefensible. It was not so in Mackenzie's time, and it will not be 
so wlion we have a new Liberal administration at Ottawa." 

The amount paid by the Conservative Government as fees to lawyers in 185K) 
was .SS9,000. In 1897, the first year of Sir Wilfrid Laurier's Government, there 
was paid out for like services a sum of $!101,40!). And the Liberal Government 
had exactly the same number of permanent law officers as its Conservative 
predecessor. 

The Liberal Government broke the Liberal Premier's pledge. 



THE 



Canada Sugar Refining Co 

(LIMITED.) 

MONTREAL. 

^ "¥: ^ 

Manufacturers of REFINED SUGARS of the 
Well-known Brand. 



¥ 







Of the Highest Quality and Purity ; made by the Latest Processes and 
the Newest and Best Machiueiy. Not Surpassed Anywhere. 



^ ^ ^ 



LUMP SUGAR. 

In 50 and 100 Iba. 



CREAM SUGARS. 

" Not Dried." 



CROWN GRANULATED. 

Special Brand. The finest whicli can be made. 



YELLOW SUGARS. 

(_)f all Grades and Standards 



EXTRA GRANULATED. 

Verj- Superior Quality. 



SYRUPS 

Of all Grades, in brls. and hf.-brls. 



Sole Maker of High Class Syrups, in tins 2 lb. and 8 lb. each. 



THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC i; 


') 


5th Month. MAY, 1899. 31 Days. 








Fm- MoiitK :il,Qiicl)PCand 


for Toronto and Prov- 


^^WTI'^'-H 


J3 


t^-^ 

K s 

^ © 




rpL'iui..; .-f St. hawrencp 


ince of Ontario, l3'in2on 


S; S'Sij'^ 


.. 


&1 


Weather Probabilities. 


iiiHl Uttuwn liivers. 


and bet.the Great hnkca. 


51=3^?; 


X 














«g ^^ 1 




Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


San 


Moon 


9'^C'^S 


5 


^ 






Rise?. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Rises 


3.B M 3 :i 


a' 






h.m. 1 


h.m. 


h.m. h.m. 


h.m. 


h.m. 


7t 


^: ? 


1 


MON. 


Fine day. 


4 48 


7 07 


27 4 51 


7 03 


21) 






cc 


2 


TUKS. 


Cloudy. 


4 47 


7 08 


1 (<2 4 50 


7 04 


.'37 








3 


Wkd. 


Cooler- 


4 46 


7 09 


1 .31 4 48 


7 06 


1 27 








4 


Thur. 


Clear day. 


4 44 


7 11 


1 •'^4 4 47 


7 07 


1 53 




5 


Frid. 


Warm. 


4 42 


7 12 


2 18 ,'4 46 


7 08 


2 18 


— cS ^ :C t-i o 


6 


Satiir. 


Thunder shower. 


4 41 


7 14 


2 45 1 4 45 


7 09 


2 46 


o.O'S.a.C' ^ 


7 


srx. 


(ienial. Pleasant. 


4 40 


7 15 


3 08 1 4 44 


7 10 


3 11 


en o = O ^ ti. 


8 


MoN. 


Fine day. 


4 38 


7 16 


3 .35 !; 4 42 


7 11 


3 40 


o-rrcr=r=r| £• 


9 


TUKS. 


Windy. 


4 37 


7 17 


4 07 |! 4 41 


7 12 


4 13 


C» .*. t-i CO *. ~ 


10 


Wed. 


Warmer. 


4 36 


7 18 


sets. 


4 40 


7 14 sets. 


B E E E 5 ' H 


11 


Thur. 


Stormy. Strong winds. 


4 34 


7 20 


9 44 


4 39 


7 15 : 9 37 




12 
13 
14 


Friu. 
Satur 


Showers. 
Windy day. 
Change. 


4 33 
4 32 
4 31 


7 21 

7 22 
7 23 


10 33 

11 15 

11 48 


1 4 38 

' 4 37 

4 36 


7 16 
7 17 
7 18 


10 26 

11 08 
11 42 


CO ^ (0 a n ^ 


-Sf^-JJtvD = 


15 


MoN. 


Thunder. 


4 29 


7 25 


morn. 


4 35 


7 19 


morn. 


cp.c.a.~ 2 


16 


TtTES. 


Kain. 


4 28 


7 26 


17 


4 34 


7 20 


12 


H-.— H-lt-l ~ 


17 


Wer. 


Clearing. 


4 27 


727 


39 


4 33 


7 21 


0.3S 'pg-^'^- 1 


18 


Thur. 


Cool. 


4 26 


7 28 


58 


4 32 


7 22 


U "J ' 1 en j:^ — CCito. 50 


19 


Frid. 


Cool winds. 


4 25 


7 29 


1 15 


4 31 


7 23 


1 15 JI'^S:^^-' = 


20 


Satur 


Unsettled. 


4 24 


7 30 


1 40 


4 30 


7 24 


1 41 


B B tS C B S 


21 


SUN. 


Thunder. 


4 23 


7 31 


2 00 


4 29 


7 25 


2 03 


< ? B B B ? 


22 
23 


MoN. 

TUES. 


Rainy day. 
Threatening. 


4 22 
4 21 


7 32 
7 33 


2 23 
2 50 


4 28 
: 4 27 


7 26 
7 27 


2 27 
2 56 




w ^^'^ 


2 


24 


Wed. 


Cloudy. Dull. 


4 20 


7 34 


3 27 


4 27 


7 28 


3 34 


^*--';?t=' 


H* 


25 


Thur. 


Change. 


4 19 


7 35 


rises. 


4 26 


7 29 


rises. |i ""^H- — — 


ts 


26 


Frid 


Warmer. 


4 18 


7 36 


9 36 


4 25 


7 30 


9 29 ;!w = 2E2 


^ 


27 


Satur. 


Sultry. Close. 


4 17 


7 37 


10 25 


4 25 


7 30 


10 18 


^ - - -I 


28 


SUJV. 


Windy. Cooler. 


4 17 


7 38 


11 04 


4 24 


7 31 


10 58 


gS"?gSl 


2 


29 


Mox- 


Thunder. 


4 16 


7 39 


11 34 


4 23 


7 32 


11 30 


SbBbB 


S 


30 


Tues. 


Clouds. Fog. 


4 15 


7 40 


11 59 


4 22 


7 33 


11 57 


"<r?? 


> 


31 


Wed. 


Damp. Foggy. 


4 15 


7 41 


morn. 


4 22 


734 


morn. 


K 


A BROKEN PLEDGE 


V.-TIIE L^ 


LND FOR 


IHE PEOPLE. 


One of the resolutions adopted at the Ottawa Liberal Conference declared 


that " the sales of public lands of the Dominion should be to actual settlers 


only, and not to speculators, upon reasonable terms of settlement, and in such 


areas as can be reasonably occupied and cultivated by the settler." 


One of the chief measures introduced by the Liberal Government in the season 


of 1898 proposed, without the asking of tenders, to give to Messrs Mackenzie and 


Mann, for the construction of 15(t miles of second class railway, from Glenora to 


Tesliii Lake, a grant of 3,750,000 acres of land with minerals, to be selected where 


the contractors pleased, and to be free from taxation. 


An Order-in-Council, adopted by the Laurier Government on July 7, 181)8, pro- 


vides that lands in the district covered by the Mackenzie-Mann proposed grant 


should not be sold for less than $10 an acre, that no applicant should get more 


than 40 acres in one place, and that the Crown should have the right to all minerals 


in or under the sold land. 


The Mackenzie-Mann deal, for which all the Liberal Ministers voted, and 


which the Liberal Party in Ilou.se of Commons supported, was contrary to the 


pledge of the Liberal Convention resolution. 



F. ROBERTSON, 

DEALER A.ND SHIPPER IN 

Ai}tl)racit^ aod BitQn)ioo(iS 




Best Cumberland Coal for Smilhing purposes coustaDlly on hand. 

Foundry and Furnace Coke delivered on lines of GRAND TRUNK and 
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, and their connections. 



Office : 65 McGill St., 



MONTREAL 



Monireai Wall Paper Factory. 




First Prize Awarded 
Wherever Exhibited 



Colin 

McArthur 

&Co. 



Office: 

1030 Notre Dame St. 



Factory : 
1026-1031 Notre Dame St and 3 15 Voltigeurs St 



Samples to the Trorle 

upon Application. 



MONTREAL. 
Encourage Home Manufactures. 



THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 



6th Month. 



JUNE, 1899. 



30 Days. 



i s ^ o 

g 2 5= => 

3.3 2.3 



ce a 
S 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
Iti 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 



*=>& 



TllUR. 

Frid. 

Sat. 

SVS. 

MoN. 

TUES. 

Wkd. 

Thur. 

Frid. 

Snt 

SUN. 

MoiV. 

'I'UKS. 

Wed. 
Thur. 

^RID. 

Sat. 

SVS. 

MoN. 

TuES. 

Wed. 
Thur. 
Frid, 

S>T. 

SUN. 

iMuN. 
TuES. 

Wed. 
Thur. 
Fri. 



Weather Probabilities. 



Pleasant. 
Summer-like. 
Sultry. Warm. 
Cloud.*. Warm. 
Thunder. 
Showery. 
Thurider storms. 
Showers. Cloudy. 
Thunder. 
Un.«ettled. 
Showery. 
Clearing. 
Hog. 

Fair. Cooler. 
Damp. Cloudy. 
Heavy rains. 
Thunder storms- 
Thunder. 

Stormy. Thunder. 
Thunder showers. 
Clear. 

Clouds. Rain. 
Rainy day. 
Change, 
("luuds. Rain. 
Thunder storms. 
Thunder. 
Heavy rains- 
Rainy. 
Thrfnder. Clearing. 



Kur AluiurL'al.yuebfC and l-'or Turoiitu and Frov- 
region» (jf St. Lawrence inee of Ontario. Ivinz on 
and Ottawa Rivers. and bet. the Great Lakes. 



Sun I Sun 
Rises- Sets. 



h.m. 
4 14 
4 13 
4 13 
4 12 



4 10 
4 10 
4 10 
4 10 
4 lo 
4 10 



4 11 



Moon 
Rises. 



h.m. 
7 41 

7 42 
7 43 
7 43 
7 44 
7 45 
7 46 
7 47 
7 47 
7 48 
7 48 
7 49 
7 49 
7 50 
7 50 
7 51 
7 51 
7 52 
7 52 
7 53 
7 53 
7 53 
7 53 
7 53 
7 53 
7 53 
7 53 
7 53 
7 53 
7 52 



h.m. 

22 

50 

1 11 

1 Gti 

2 07 

2 43 

3 26 
sets. 
9 12 
9 48 

10 18 

10 42 

11 03 
11 21 
11 41 
morn. 

03 
24 

49 

1 21 

2 01 
2 53 

rises. 

H 01 

9 36 

10 03 

10 27 

10 53 

11 17 
11 41 



Sun 
Rises 



Sun 

Sets. 



h.m. 
4 21 

4 20 
4 20 
4 19 
4 19 



18 

18 

17 

17 

17 

16 

16 

4 16 

4 16 

4 16 

4 16 

4 16 

4 17 

4 17 

4 17 

4 18 

4 18 

4 18 

4 19 

4 19 

4 19 

4 20 

4 20 

4 21 

4 21 



h-m. 

7 34 
7 35 
7 36 
7 37 
7 37 
7 38 
7 39 
7 39 
7 40 
7 41 
7 41 
7 42 
7 43 
7 43 
7 44 
7 44 
7 44 
7 45 
7 45 
7 45 
7 46 
7 46 
7 46 
7 46 
7 46 
7 46 
7 46 
i 7 46 
7 45 
7 45 



Moon 
Rises. 



h.m. 

21 

51 

1 14 

1 41 

2 13 

2 50 

3 33 
sets. 
9 05 
9 42 

10 12 

10 88 

11 01 
11 20 
11 42 
morn. 

05 
28 

54 

1 27 

2 08 

3 00 
rises. 

8 54 

9 31 
10 00 
10 26 

10 53 

11 19 
11 45 






BB5S 






EBBB 
?3B3 





a. a. 


B-=rtr:r 


3 5 


BB 


<- 


B5 



rrtrzr g 



A BROKEN PLEDGE 



VL— OFFICES FOR M.P's. 

One of the practices denounced as "evils" under the Conservative Govern- 
ment was the appointment of members of the House of Commons to places in 
tlie Senate and the public service. Hon. Mr. Mulock, in the session of 18fl(i, 
brought in a bill to i)revent it, by requiring that no member of Parliament coukl 
accept a public odice in the gift of the Dominion Government till the lapse of a 
ti.xed period after lie had ceased to hold his seat. Mr. Mulock condemned the 
appointment of members of Parliament to ollice, and Mr. Lister, seconding his 
friend's efforts, said : " The evil aimed at by my hon. friend from York is a 
decided evil, and, if it is possible to get at it, this House should cure it." 

Here is the list of Liberal members of Parliament who, under the Laiirier 
Liberal Government, liave succumbed to the evil, and the ottices they accepted : 

Mr. Bechard, St. .Johns, a senat^orship. 

Mr. King, Snnbury and Queens, a senatorship. 

Mr. Forl)es, Shelburne and Queens, a.judgesliip. 

Mr. Devlin, Wright, an immigration agency. 

Mr. Lavergne, Drummondand Arthabaska, a judgeship. 

Mr. Langelier, Quebec Centre, ajudgesliip. 

Mr. Fiset, Rimouski, a senatorship. 

P.Ir. M. C. Cam*;ron, West Huron, a lieutenant-governorship. 

Mr. Lister, West Lambton, ajudgesliip. 

Mr. Choquette, Montmagny, a judgeship. 

Mr. Yeo, East Prince, a senatorship. 

The pledge imjilied in Mr. Mulock's resolution has been broken. 



Canadian Pacific Railway's 

TEILEIGRARH 

Working in direct connection with 

POSTAL TELEGRAPH COMPANY 

AND 

COMMERCIAL CABLE COMPANY 



REACHES ALL IMPORTANT PARTS OF THE WORLD 



Despatches Transmitted with Promptness and Accuracy. 



HEAD OFFICE, ■ ■ ■ MONTREAL, 

Cor. St. Francois Xavier and Hospital Streets. 



THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 



1!) 



7th Month. 



JULY, 1899. 



31 Days. 



.a 


>.^ 




>• c 


-5 » 




«l 


Q^ 




1 


SaTI R 




?. 


NUN. 




3 


iMox. 




4 


'J'UKS. 




5 


Wkr. 




6 


Thur. 




7 


Frid. 




H 


Satuk. 




9 


SIJN. 




10 


MoN. 




11 


TUES. 




12 


Wki> 


! 


13 


Thur. 


1 


14 


F' II). 




15 


SaTU'i. 




1« 


sux. 




17 


Mov. 




18 


TuES. 




19 


Wed. 




20 


Thur. 




21 


Frid. 




22 


Satur 




2:i 


.SUN. 




24 


M..N. 




25 


TUKS 




26 


Wed. 




27 


Thur 




28 


Frid. 




29 


Satur. 




m 


SUN. 




SI 


Mox. 





Weather Probabilities. 



Un.settled. 
Threatening. 
Rain. 
Clouds. 
Thunder. 
Thunderstorms. 
Storm?. Thunder. 
Thunder showers. 
Change. 
.Showers. 
I»amp. Foggj'. 
Rainy day. 
Clouds. 
Hain. 
Showery- 
Changeable- 
I 'lea ring 
Windy day. 
Change. 

Cloudy- Rainy. 
I lamp day. 
Clearing. 
Unsettled. 
Thunder. 
Showers. 
.Showery. 
Unsettled. 
Clearing. 
Thunder. 
Change. 
Varifible. 



tor Montreal, Qufbef and Por Torout« and Prov- 
rrgione of 8t. Liiwrpnce incp of Ontario, lyiniron 
and Ottawa Kivcrs. | and hot. thie lii cat Lakes 



Sun 
Rises 



h.in. 



15 
16 
]fi 
17 
17 
18 
19 
4 20 
4 20 
4 21 
4 22 
4 Zi 
4 24 
4 25 
4 26 
4 27 
4 28 
4 29 
4 -iO 
4 31 
4 32 
4 33 
4 34 
4 .35 
4 ,36 
4 37 
4 38 
4 39 
4 40 
4 41 
4 42 



Sun 

Sets. 



h.m. 

7 52 
7 52 
7 52 
7 51 
7 51 
7 51 
7 50 
7 50 
7 49 
7 49 
7 48 
7 48 
7 47 
7 46 
7 45 
7 44 
7 44 
7 43 
7 42 
7 41 
7 40 
7 .39 
7 38 
7 37 
7 36 
7 35 
7 34 
7 3-3 
7 32 
7 31 
7 .30 



Moon 
Rises. 



h.ni. 
morn. 

09 

43 

1 23 

2 10 

3 02 
3 58 
sets. 

8 47 

9 08 
9 ?3 
9 46 

10 07 
10 28 

10 50 

11 18 
11 54 
morn. 

38 

1 34 

2 42 
ris^■p. 

8 04 
8 30 

8 5t 

9 23 
9 47 

10 13 

10 46 

11 23 
morn. 



Sun Sun 
Rises. Sets. 



m. 

22 

23 

23 

24 

25 

25 

26 

27 

28 

4 28 

4 29 

4 30 

4 30 

4 31 

4 32 

4 33 

4 34 

4 3t 

4 35 

4 36 

4 .37 

4 38 

4 39 

4 40 

4 41 

4 42 

4 43 

4 44 

4 45 

4 46 

4 48 



h.m. 
7 45 
7 45 
7 45 
7 44 
7 44 
7 44 
7 43 
7 43 
7 42 
7 42 
7 41 
7 41 
7 40 
7 40 
7 .39 
7 38 
7 37 
7 37 
7 .36 
7 35 
7 35 
7 34 
7 33 
7 32 
7 31 
7 30 
7 29 
7 28 
7 ■>7 
7 26 
7 25 



iMoon 
Rises. 



h.m. 
morn. 
15 

49 

1 30 

2 17 

3 ('9 

4 05 
sets. 

8 42 

9 05 
9 26 
9 46 

10 (9 
10 .30 

10 64 

11 24 
morn. 

01 

45 

1 41 

2 49 
rise.". 

7 59 

8 28 

8 51 

9 24 
9 51 

10 18 

10 .52 

11 30 
morn. 



p C_t'(B I ^ 

= = c e . 

S 2 ^ = ; » 



«0 to J" -I 5f 

BS5S 2 



1 31 CO V> hS ■ W 



ri — --^ — 

3 B 5 B 



r^^^^l-■ I o 

crp-cr=" ' =■ 

. _, - .. ' s 

— ^ — pg 

B B B B 1 

< < •^ M* 



A BROKEN PLEDGE 



VIL— FOREIGN TRADE. 

The acliievements of the Laurier Government in gaining new markets for 
Canada".s products have not been in keeping with its members' promises. The 
United States market of seventy millions lias not taken as much of Canadian 
products during the term of a Liberal Miiiistrj- at Ottawa, as it did in the old 
Conservative days, and the setting up at Ottawa of a friendly Liberal Govern- 
ment, instead of a hostile Tory one, was regularly held forth in Liberal speeche.s 
and Liberal resolutions as the first step towards the needed great expansion. 

The preferential clause of the Laurier tarid", also, practically closed the grow- 
ing German demand for Canadian agricultural products, through the imposition 
by Germany, in retaliation against the Laurier taritis higher duties on German 
than on British goods, of the highest German duties on Canadian exports. The 
German duty on Canadian wheat and rye is oO marks per 1,000 kilos, while that 
on United States grain is only 35 marks ; on oats 40 marks as against 2(5 ; on 
barley 22.i, marks as against 20 ; and on peas 20 marks as against bo. Canadian 
wheat and rye have to pay in Germany over 9 cents a bushel more than V. S.. 
grain of the same kind, oats over 4 cents, barley 1^ cents and peas 3^ cents. No 
Canadian wheat, rye, barley or peas are now taken by Germany, in direct conse- 
quence of the Laurier tariff legislation. 



ALLAN LINE 



ESTABLISHED IN 1854 



Royal Mail ••• ••• ••• 

Steamship Company 



THE COMPANY'S FLEET CONSISTS OF THIRTY-FOUR 
STEAMERS. AGGREGATING 134,937 TONS. 



— INCLUDING — 

Tunisian, 10,000 tons 

Twin Screw. 

Bavarian, 10,000 tons 

Twin Screw. 

Castilian, 8,800 tons 
Parisian, 5,500 tons 
Californian, 4,500 tons 



SIX SEF^ARATE SERVICES. 

Steamers sail weekly from Montreal and Quebec to Liverpool during the 
season of navigation ; also separate service from New York to Glasgow. 

The St. Lawrence route is 1,000 miles less ocean sailing than from New York. 

Tliree daj's' sailing on smooth water. 

Portland, St. John, N.B., and Halifax to Liverpool in winter. 

The steamers are fitted with every improvement for the comfort of the pass- 
engers, in all classes, including bilge keels, making the vessels steady in all 
weather, electric light, midship saloons, spacious promenade decks, music rooms, 
smoking rooms, etc. 

Special attention has been paid to the ventilation and sanitary arrangements. 
An experienced surgeon is carried on all passenger steamers. 

Rates of passage lower than by most first-class lines. Circular giving rates 
and sailings, on application to 

ALLANS, RA£ & CO., Quebec. S. CUNARD & CO., Halifax. 

H. BOURLIER, Toronto. ROBERT KERR, Winnipeg, 

or H. & A. ALLAN, Montreal. 




THE PEOPLES ALMANAC 21 


8th Month. AUGUST, 1899. 31 Days. 






1 


For.Montroal.Quehec and iFor Toronto and Prov- 


p-^Si!^ 


wO 


»^ja 




rcRions of St. Lawrence iiice of Ontario, lying on 


5 = ^® 


a 


^O 


«^ 


Weather Prorabtlities. 


aiirl Ottawa Rivers. | and bet. the Great I^akee. 


A = 2=.< 


^^. 


p^ 




Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


E - c = 


5 




1 


Kise.". 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Rises, 
h.m. 


Set?. 


Rises. 


s o ^ 5 

3. 3^3 


ce" 

"0 

IS 








h.m. 


h.m. 


h.m. 1 


h m. 


h.m. 


"-1 


a 

1 




1 


TUKS 


Clouds. 


4 43 


7 28 


('8 


4 49 


7 23 


15 








u 


2 


Wkd. 


Dismal. Dull. 


4 44 


7 27 


57 1 i 4 50 


7 22 


1 04 








? 


3 
4 


Thur. Rainy day. 
Frh). Cloud}'. 


4 45 
4 4fi 


7 26 
7 25 


1 53 1 1 4 51 

2 51 : ! 4 52 


7 21 

7 20 


2 00 
2 58 














5 


Sat I Clearing. 


4 47 


7 23 


3 52 , ; 4 53 


7 18 


3 58 


SgE» 


S! 


6 


SUN.; Windy. Clear. 


4 A9 


7 22 


sets. 


4 54 


7 17 


sets. 


O.P.O.S 


H 


7 


MON. 


Fine d»y. 


4 50 


7 20 


7 34 


4 55 


7 16 


7 33 


a."5-.-5 


9 


8 


TUES. 


Warmer. 


4 51 


7 19 


7 53 


4 56 


7 14 


7 52 


a zrs-~r 


2 


9 


Wed. 


Sultry. Hot. 


4 52 


7 18 


8 16 i 


4 57 


7 13 


8 17 


V<^Vi^ 




10 


Thur. 


Clear. Warm. 


4 54 


7 16 


8 3t 


4 59 


7 11 


8 36 


EEB5 


O 


11 


Frid. 


Windy. 


4 55 


7 15 


8 55 


5 00 


7 10 


8 59 




12 


Sat. 


Change. 


4 56 


7 13 


9 20 


5 01 


7 08 


9 26 


^ 

<<¥? 


2! 


13 
14 


SUBT. 
MoN. 


Variable. 
Thunder. 


4 5S 
4 59 


7 11 
7 10 


9 53 
10 31 


5 02 
5 03 


7 07 
7 05 


9 59 
10 38 






tote — 


~f 


15 


TuES. 


Ramy day. 


5 00 


7 08 


11 21 


5 04 


7 03 


11 28 




16 


Wkd. 


Heavy rains. 


5 01 


7 06 


morn. 


5 05 


7 02 


mom. 


^ 


X 


17 


Thi'r. 


Thunder storms. 


5 i)-i 


7 05 


(1 21 


5 06 


7 00 


28 


Cn OCT In 

=rcr=r5- 


g 


18 


Frid. 


Warm day. 


5 03 


7 03 


1 .33 ! 5 07 


6 59 


1 39 


' c;i .£..0'.** 


s 


19 


Sat 


Clear. Hot day. 


5 05 


7 01 


2 50 : i 5 08 


6 57 


2 56 


< 5E55 


2 


20 


SUN. 


Showers. Sultry. 


5 0(3 


6 59 


4 14 


5 09 


6 55 


4 18 


c? 


21 


MoN. 


Great heat. Showers. 


5 07 


6 58 


rises. 


5 10 


6 54 


rises. 


A A r« iM 


ss 


22 
23 


TuES. 

Wed. 


Sweltering. 
Sultry. 


5 08 
5 10 


6 56 
6 54 


7 25 
7 49 


5 11 

5 12 


6 52 
6 50 


7 26 
7 57 






i totss^^ 




24 


Thur. 


Heavy rain.'. Floods. 


5 11 


6 52 


8 14 


5 14 


6 49 


8 18 


2S£2 


g 


25 


Frid. 


Foggy. Damp, 


5 12 


6 50 


8 47 


5 15 


6 47 


8 53 




^ 


26 


Sat. 


Sultry. Hot day. 


5 13 


6 49 


9 23 


5 16 


6 46 


9 29 


»Ck.^.£k. J4. 


CB 


27 


NUN. 


Change. 


5 14 


6 47 


10 06 


5 17 


6 44 


10 13 


CT'D'CT^ 


g 


28 


MoN. 


Windy day. 


5 16 


6 45 


10 54 


5 18 


6 4;; 


11 01 


^'S^'^ 


n 


29 


Tues. 


Cloud=. 


5 17 


6 43 


11 49 


5 20 


6 41 


11 56 


B B E 5 


90 


30 


Wed. 


Unsettled. 


5 IK 


6 41 


morn. 


5 21 


6 39 


morn. 


1 ® 25 s 


z, 


31 


Thur. 


Changeable. 


5 20 


6 40 


45 


5 23 


6 38 


52 il ^ ^ ■ ^ 


> 




BROI 

VIII 


CEN PLEDGES 


.—KNIGHTHOODS. 




When men like Sir John Macdonald, Sir Leonard Tilley, Sir .John Carling, 


Sir 


John Abbott and Sir John Thompson were given knighthoods by the Queen, 


the 


y were assailed in the Liberal press as wearers of tin-pot titles. Once at a 


public meeting in Western Ontario, the leader of the Liberal Opposition was 


addressed by a clergyman as " Sir Wilfrid Laurier." The clergyman was 


pul 


)licly corrected by that gentleman for his mistake, and told that Liberals were 


democrats, who did not believe in and did not accept titles. At the Liberal Con- | 


vei 


tion one speaker won cheers by declaring that holders of titles were a benighted 


lot. 


Mr. Edgar, M.P., wrote a pamphlet on " loyalty," in whicii he said : 




" Canadians are sensible enough to place small value ui)on the Downing Street 


titl 


es and decorations, which are so often otlered to our put)lic men." 




At the first opportunity Mr. Wilfrid Laurier. the democrat, took a knight- 


hoc 


)d, and so did Mr. P>lgar, quoted above, and Mr. Davies, till there are 


mo 


re men with knighthoods on the Liberal side in Parliament than on the 


Coi 


iservative side. 




Tlie Liberal pledge in this matter was not kept. 



BANK OF MONTREAL 

INCORPORATED BY ACT OF PARLIAMENT. 

Capital (all paid-up) $12,000,000 00 

Reserved Fund 6,000,000 00 

Undivided Profits 981,328 31 

HEAD OFFICE, = - iVIONTRKAL. 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS: 

Rt. Hon. Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal, G.C.M.G., - President. 
Hon. G. A. Drummond, ...... Vice-President. 

' A. T. Patersou, Plsq. R. B. Angus, Esq. 

W. C. McDonald, bsq. W. W. Ogilvie, Esq. 

Hugh McLennan, Esq. Edward B. Greensliields, Esq. 

A. F. Gault, Esq. 
E. S. CLOUSTON, General Manager. 
A. Macnider, Chief Inspector and Sunerintendent of Branches. 
W. S. Cloustox, Inspector of Branch Returns. 
F. W. Taylor, Assistant Inspector. 

JAMES AIRD, Secretary. 

Branches in Canada : 

MONTREAL— H. Y. Meredith, Manager. 

Almonte, Out. Halifax, N.S. Picton, Ont. 

Amherst, N.S. Kingston, Ont. Quebec, Que. 

Belleville, Out. Letbridge Alberta. Regina, Assiniboia. 

Brantford, " Lindsay, Ont. Rossland, B.C. 

Brockville, " London, " Sarnia, Ont. 

Cnlgary, Alberta. Moncron, N.B. Stratford, Ont. 

Chatham, NB. Montreal, Que. St. .John. N.B. 

Chatham, Ont. " West End Br. St. Marys, Ont. 

Cornwall, " " Seigneurs St. Br. Toronto. Ont. 

Deseronto, " Nelson, B.C. " YongeSt. Br. 

Fori William, Ont. New Denver, B.C. Wallaceburg. Ont. 

Goderich, " New Westminster, B.C. Winnipeg, Man. 

Greenwood, B.C. Ot avva, Out. Vancouver, B.C. 

Guelph, Ont. Perth, " Vernon, B.C. 

Hamilton, Ont. Peterboro, Ont. Victoria, B.C. 

In Ne^vfoundland- 

St. John's, Nfld.— Bank of Montreal. 

In Great Britain. 

London— Bank of Montreal, 22 Abchurch Lane, E.C.. Ale.x. Lang, Manager. 

In the United States. 

New Y'ork— R. Y". Hebden and J. 'SI. Greata, agents, 7>Q Wall Street. 
Chicago — Bank of Montreal. A\'. Munro, ^Manager. 

BANKERS IN GREAT BRITAIN. 

London — The Bank of England. The Union Bank of London. The London 
and Westminster Bank. The National Provincial Bank of England. 
Liverpool- The Bank of Liverjjool, Ltd. 
Scotland— The British Linen Company Bank, and Branches. 

BANKERS IN THE UNITED STATES. 

New York— The National Citv liank. i Bull'alo— The Murine Bank, Buffalo. 

The Bk. of New York, N.B. A. 1 San Francisco- The First National Bk. 
Boston— The Merchants National Bank. " Bk. of Brit. Columbia. 

J. B. Moors & Co. I " Anglo-Califoruian Bk. 

Portland, Oregon— The Bank of British Columbia. 



TH1<: PEOPLES ALMANAC 



9th Month. 



SEPTEMBER, 1899. 



30 Days. 






Frid. 

Sat. 

RUN. 

M.N. 

TiKs. 

Wkd. 

Thur. 

Frid. 

Sat. 

SUN. 

M ON. 

Turs. 

AVk.d. 

Thur. 

Frid. 

Sat. 

sux. 

M ON. 

Tl'ks. 

^^■ED. 

Thi'k. 
Frid. 
Sat. 

SUN. 

MoN. 
TlKS 

Wkd. 
Thur. 
Frid. 
Sat. 



Weather Probabilities. 



For Montreal, Quibcc an. I For Toronto an'l Prov- 
cgions of St. Lawrence . inee of Oninrio, Ivinzon 



Warm. 

Sultrj' das'. 

Threatening. 

Rain. 

Change. 

Clear. 

Cool. 

Windy day. 

Much warmer. 

>ultn'. Kain. 

Clouds. 

Frosty. Cool. 

Clouds. Kain. 

Cloudy day. 

Rainy. 

Warmer. 

Threatening. 

Riiin. 

Damp, dull day. 

Variable. 

Clear. 

Fine day. 

Changeable. 

Cooler. 

Brilliant. 

Fine Autumn weather. 

Frosty. Cool. 

Clouds. 

Thunder. 

Warm. 



and Ottawa Kivcrs. 



and bet. the O'eat Lakes 



Sun 
Kises. 



h.m. 
5 21 
5 22 
5 23 
5 24 
5 26 
5 -27 
5 28 
5 29 
5 3) 
5 31 
5 33 
5 34 
5 35 
5 36 
5 3S 
5 39 
5 40 
5 42 
5 43 
5 44 
5 45 
5 47 
5 48 
5 49 
5 50 
5 52 
5 53 
5 54 
5 56 
5 57 



Sun 

Seis. 

h.m. 
6 38 
6 36 
6 34 
6 32 
6 30 
6 28 
6 26 
6 24 
6 22 
6 20 
6 18 
6 16 
6 15 
6 13 
6 11 
6 09 
6 07 
6 07 
6 03 
6 01 
5 59 
5 57 
5 56 
5 54 
5 52 
5 50 
5 48 
5 46 
5 44 
5 42 



Moon 
Rises. 



h m. 

1 45 

2 47 

3 51 

4 54 
sets. 

6 43 

7 01 
7 26 

7 55 

8 31 

9 15 

10 10 

11 15 
morn. 

28 

1 46 

3 08 

4 33 
rises. 

6 14 

6 44 

7 19 

8 01 

8 49 

9 41 

10 38 

11 38 
morn. 

39 

1 42 



Sun 
Rises. 

h-m. 
5 24 

5 25 
5 26 
5 27 
5 28 
5 29 
5 30 
5 81 
5 32 
533 

I 5 34 
5 3.5 
5 36 
5 37 
5 39 
5 40 
5 41 
5 42 
5 43 
5 44 
5 46 

I 5 47 
5 48 
5 50 
5 51 
5 52 
5 53 
5 55 
5 56 

! 5 57 



Sun 
Sets- 



Moon 
Rises. 



h.m. 
6 35 

6 34 
6 32 
6 3') 
6 28 
6 26 
6 24 
6 22 
6 20 
6 19 
6 17 
6 15 
6 14 
6 11 
6 09 
6 08 
6 06 
6 05 
6 03 
6 01 
5 59 
5 57 
5 56 
5 54 
5 52 
5 50 
5 48 
5 47 
5 45 
5 43 



h.m 

1 51 

2 52 

3 54 

4 56 
sets. 

6 44 

7 05 

7 31 

8 01 

8 .38 

9 22 

10 17 

11 22 
morn. 

34 

1 51 

3 U 

4 34 
rises. 

6 18 

6 49 

7 25 

8 08 

8 56 

9 48 

10 45 

11 44 
morn. 

45 

1 46 






slS-ZE. ! -^ 



. . ^- ■*- w I » 



Be 





«5 






CLSL^a. 


X 


-.£ 31 W.O 


cra-=r3- 


^ 


CO>».00 


7) 


CO — -.0 00 




ESbS 


a 


„ ^ a a 


> 



DC en tv^ 00 

CO — :o.>3 

5 5 B S 

— — o o 



BROKEN PLEDGES 

IX.-MANITOBA SCHOOLS. 

In the Province of Quebec the Liberals conducted the campaign of 1896 on a 
platform of doina; justice, as they put it, to the Roman Catholics of Manitoba, 
who had been deprived by the Liberal majority in Manitoba of their separate 
school privileges. Sir "Wilfrid Laurier, in a speech at St. Rochs, on May 7, told 
his Catholic hearers that if justice was not done, the powers of the constitution 
would be fallen back on. At Beloeil, on May 30, Hon. Mr. GeoflVion promised to 
do more for the Manitoba Catholics than the Tory Remedial Bill provided for. 
Hon. Mr. Fitzpatrick, now solicitor-general, at Ste. Marie de la Beauce, on June 
o, said if Sir Wilfrid Laurier reached power and did not .settle the School Ques- 
tion at the first session, in accordance with the terms of the Privy Council 
decision and the Episcopal Mandament, he would resign. 

On the !)th December, 1S9G, the W^innipeg Catholics protested against the 
terms of the so-called settlement. The encyclical of Pope Leo XIII, given at St. 
Peters on the 8th December, 181)7, says of the " settlement," that " the law which 
they (the Legislature of Manitoba), have passed to repair the injury is defective, 
unsuitable, insufficient. The Catholics ask, and no one can deny that they justly 
ask, for much more." 

The Roman Catholic members of the Laurier Ministry broke their pledges to 
the Roman Catholic electors of Canada. 



the: molsons bank 

INCORPORATED BY ACT OF PARLIAMENT, 1855. 



HEAD OKKICE, 



MONTREAL. 



Paid Up Capital, $2,000,000. Rest Fund, $1,500,000. Reserve for 

rebate on Current Discounts, $80,000. Profit and Loss, $81,020.95. 

-$1,661,020.95. 

BOAF4D OE DIRECTORS. 

Wm. Miilson Macpherson, President- S. H. Ewing, Vice-President. AV. M. Ramsay, 

Henry Archbald, Samuel FiDley, J. P. Cleghorn, H. Markland Molson, 

jr. Wolferstan Thomas, Gen. Manager, A. D. Durnford, inspector, 

H- Lock wood and W. W. L. Chipman, Asst. Inspectors. 



BRANCHES. 



Alvinston,0. Hamilton, 0. 

Aylmer, O. London. O. 

Brockville, 0. Mealord.O. 
Calgary, Alberta. Montreal, P Q 
Clinton, O. '' 8te. Caiherine. 

Exeter, 0. Morrisburg, 0. 



Norwich, 0. 

Ottawa. 0- 

Owen Sound, 0. 

Quebe<-, P. Q. 

Revelstoke Station, B 0. Toronto, 0, 

Kidgetown, 0. Toronto Jt., 

AGENTS, 



Simcoe, 0. Trenton, 0. 

Smith's Falls, 0. Yancoiiver,B.C. 
S'irel P. Q Victoria, B. C- 

St. Thomas, 0. Wate'loo.O. 

Winiiipez, Man. 

\Voodstcck,0. 



British Columbia, Bank of British Columbia. 
Manitoba and North West. Imperial Bank of Canada. 
Ivew Brunswick, Bank of New Brunswick, 
Newfoundland, Bank of Nova Scotia. 

Nov.a Scoiia, Halifax Ba)iking Company, Bank of Yarmouth- 
Ontario, Canadinn Bank of Commerce, Dominion Bank, Imperial Bank of Canada. 
Prince Edward Island, Merchants Bank of P. EI , Summerside Bank. 
Quebec. Eastern Townships Bank. 
Yukon Territory, Dawson City, Bank of British North America. 

IN EUROF-E. 

London — Parr's Bank, Limited, Morton Chaplin &. Co. 
Liverjiool — The Bank of Liverpool, Limited. 
Cork— Munster and I.einster Bank. Limited. 
France. Paris — Society (i^n^rale, Credit Lyonnais. 
Germany, Berlin — Deutsche 15ank. 



Antwerp, Belgium— L,a Banque d'Anvers- 
(iermany, Hamburg — Hesse, Newman k Co. 

IN UNITED STATES. 



New York — Mechanics' National Bank. 

Messrs. Morton Bliss & Co. 

National City Bank. 

Hanover National Bank. 
Boston- State National Bank. 

Surtolk Nat. Bank. Kidder. Peabody & Co. 
Portland— Casco National Bank. 
Chicago — First National Bank. 
Cleveland — Commercial Na'ional Bank. 
Detroit — State Savings Bank. 



Buffalo-The City Bank 

Milwaukee — Wisconsin National Bank of 

iMilwaukee. 
Minneapolis— First National Bank ; North 

Western National Bank. 
Toledo— Second National Bank. 
Butie— Montana— First National Bank. 
Sau Francisco and Pacific Coast — Bank of 
British Columbia. 



i 




THE PF 


OPLl 

roB 


E'S ALMANAC 






25 


10th Month. OC 


ER, 1899. 


oi navs. 








I'lir iMiiiitriuHiuelKcaiid For Toronto and Hrox - 


— '^■nv! 


1 


. ja 






regions ot St. Lawrence|| ince ot Ontario, lying "n 








«| 




aiid Ottawa Hivcr 


and bet.the Great I^akfs 




po 


O^ 




Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


f?^2 


5 








Rises. 


Sets- 


Rises- 


Rises- 


Sets 


Rises. 




IS 








b.m. 


h.m. 


li.m. 


h.m. 


h.m. 


hm. 


1 


srw. 


Windy. Fall like. 


5 58 


5 40 


2 44 


5 57 


5 40 


2 46 




ca 


2 


MON. 


Cooler- 


6 (10 


5 39 


3 49 


5 59 


5 39 


3 50 




a> 


3 
4 


TUKS. 

Wed. 


Hriiliant. 
Fine and clear. 


fi 01 
6 02 


5 37 
5 35 


4 50 

5 55 


fi 00 
6 01 


5 38 
ft 36 


4 50 

5 53 






, - 1 


5 


Thuk. 


Pleasant day. 


6 03 


5 33 


sets. 


6 02 


5 34 


sets. 




^ 


6 


Frid. 


Change. 


6 05 


5 31 


5 58 


6 04 


5 3< 


6 Ot 


cCa.£.p. 




7 


S4T. 


Rainy day. 


6 06 


5 29 


6 34 


6 05 


5 31 


6 40 




2 


8 


SlIIV. 


Foegy. Damp. 


6 07 


5 27 


7 16 


6 06 


5 29 


7 23 


CrD'ETp- 


9 


MoN. 


Variiiblo. 


6 09 


5 25 


8 06 


6 07 


5 28 


8 13 


^ — .^ 


to 


10 


TUES. 


Chanseable. 


6 10 


5 23 


9 07 


6 08 


5 26 


9 14 


5 B B B 




11 


Wed. 


Warmer- 


6 11 


5 22 


10 16 


6 09 


5 21 


10 22 






12 


Thur. 


Blustry. Frost. 


6 13 


5 20 


11 29 


6 10 


5 23 


11 35 


B"B° a, 1 


18 


Bkid. 


Rainy. 


6 14 


5 18 


morn. 


6 12 


5 21 




! 


14 


Sat. 


Damp day. 


6 15 


5 17 


47 


6 13 


5 19 


51 


lv:%i— >i— * 




15 


SHX. 


Clouds. 


6 16 


5 15 


2 08 


6 14 


5 18 


2 10 




•i 


IP, 


M. N. 


Cloudv. Dull- 


6 18 


5 13 


3 28 


6 15 


5 16 


3 28 






17 


TUE.S. 


Dull (lay. 


6 19 


5 11 


4 42 


6 16 


5 14 


4 40 


^o-~=r 


g 


18 


Wkd. 


Change. 


6 21 


5 10 


6 02 


6 18 


5 13 


5 58 




S 


19 


Thi;r. 


Warmer. 


6 22 


5 08 


rises. 


6 19 


5 11 


rises. 


ocn^o. 




20 


Frid. 


Rainy- 


6 23 


5 07 


5 53 


8 20 


5 09 


6 00 


5B5 5 




21 


Sat. 


Threat oning. 


6 25 


5 05 


6 39 


6 22 


5 (18 


6 46 


K * S ® 


»• 


22 
23 


SUN. 

M()\. 


Stormy. Snow. 
Rain or snow. 


6 26 
6 27 


5 03 
5 02 


7 31 

8 27 


6 23 
6 24 


5 06 
5 05 


7 38 

8 U 


^ 




^^ 


24 


TuES. 


Change. 


6 29 


5 00 


9 •/- 


6 2.5 


5 03 


9 33 


gs-.^ 


o 


25 


Wed. 


Foggy - 


6 30 


4 58 


10 28 


6 27 


5 01 


10 34 




H 


26 


Thur- 


Unsettled. 


6 31 


4 57 


11 30 


6 28 


5 00 


11 34 


tow — o 


§ 


27 


Frid- 


Threatening. 


6 32 


4 55 


morn. 


6 29 


4 58 


morti. 




28 


Sat. 


Clearing. Fine. 


6 34 


4 54 


33 


6 31 


4 56 


36 




sa 


29 


SUN. 


Warmer. 


6 35 


4 53 


1 38 


.6 32 


4 55 


1 39 


6 = 55 


a 


30 


MoN. 


Plensant dny. 


6 36 


4 50 


2 38 


6 33 


4 53 


2 38 




> 


31 


TrEs. 


UrillifiTit. 


K .?« 


4 id 


3 42 


6 S4 


i 51 


3 41 


B<2,% 


a; 






BROK 


EN PL 


EDC 


ES 











X.-A BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION- 

AVhen tlie Laurier Governnioiit was fornied the Liberal press hailed it as 
" the strongest business government Canada ever saw," and made predictions as 
to the sujjeriority it would show over its Conservative predecessoi-. 

It found, ready to sign, a contract for a fast Athintic mail ser\iee- with 
vessels of 20 knot speed, guaranteed by the Allan Line, and the i)rineiple of which 
had been approved of by the i)oards of trade of the country. It refused to carry 
out the agreement, made a new- one with a firm that could not fulfil its con- 
tract, and in J8i)8 was down to advertising for a service of IH knot boats. 

The Conservative Government made an agreement for tite construction of tlie 
Crow's Nest Pass Railway for a bonus of ^l,()50.0()(l. The Laurier Government 
disregarded it and made an arrangeinent to pay ij?;{,(i:W,00t) for the work. 

Tlie Laurier Government authorized a reduction of jmstage to Great Britain 
to 2 cents, then found it had exceeded its power, and cancelled its proclamation. 
Tlien it made an arrangement for charging 2 cents on a letter between Canada 
and Great Britain, and ;! cents on letters between difl'erent parts of Canada. 

It was not a business governmei'.t in these Ihings. It broke the pledges made 
in regard to it. 



i-ie:AD oF-p- ce:, - - ivio nit re /XL- 
Capital Paid-Up, $8,000,000. - Reserve Fund. $2,600,000. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

A>'DKEW ALIiAN, Esq., Pvesident. HECTOE MACKENZIE, Esq.. Vice-President. 

JONATHAN HODliSON, Esq., JOHN CASSILS, Esq., H. MONTAGU ALLAN. Esq., 

JAMES P. DAWES, Esq., ROBERT MACKAY, Esq. THOMAS LONG. Esq. 

GEORGE HAGUE, General Manager. THOMAS FYSHE, Joint-General Manager. 

E. E. HhBDEN, SiqU. of Branches. 

BRANCHES IN ONTARIO AND QUEBEC. 



Montreal. 


Clifitliam. 


Kinc.'irdine, 


Oakville, 


Quel.ec, 


St. Thomas, 0. 


■• St.Cath.St.Br. 


Gait. 


Kingston, 


Ottawa, 


Renfrew. 


Tilburv, 


Alvinstou, 


Gananoque, 


Leamington, 


Owen Sound, 


Sherbrooke, 


Toronto, 


Belleville, 


Hamilton, 


Loudon, 


Perth, 


Stratford. 


Walkerton, 


Berlin. 


Hcspeler. 


Mitchell, 


Prescott, 


St. Jerome. 


Windsor, 


Bramiiton, 


Ingersoll, 


Napanee, 


Preston, 


St. Johns, Q. 




Branch 


es in Man 


toba and North West— 


-Winnipeg, Brandon, Edmonton, 



Medicine Hat, Neepawa, Portage La Prairie, Souris. 

Bankers in (-treat Britain — London. Glasgow, Edinburgh and other points. The Clydes- 
dale Bank, (Limited). Liverpool, Hank of Liverpool, (Limited). 

Agency in New York — 63 and 6.5 Wall St., Messrs. T. E. Merrett, acting Agent. 

Banke'-s in United States — New York: American Exchange National Bank; Boston: 
Merchants Nat. Bank, Boston: Chicago: Northern Trusts Co., Chicago ; St. Paul. Minn.: First 
National Bank ; Detroit: First National Bank; Buffalo: Bank of Buffalo; San Francisco : Bank 
of British Columbia. 

Xeiv/oundland — Merchants Bank of Halifax. 

Nova Scotia mid Netc BransxvU k — Bank of Nova Scotia and Merchants Bank of Halifax. 

A general Banking business transacted. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in China, Japan and other foreign countries. 



flQontPeal City and 

DistPJGt Sav in gs Bank 

HEHD OFFICE, 176 ST. JHMES ST. 



Capital Suhcriljed, $2,000,000 Capital paid up $600,000, Reserve, $400,000 



656 NOTRE DAME ST. 2312 NOTRE DAME ST. 1532 ST. CATHERINE ST. 
POINT ST. CHARLES, Cor. Grand Trunk and Shearer Sts. 

Sir Wm. HING8T0N, President, HENRI BARBEAU, Mgr. 



THE PEOPLES ALMANAC 



11th Month. 



NOVEMBER, 1899. 



30 Days. 



B^ 



Wed. 
Thub. 
Fkid. 

S»T. 

Sl'X. 

MoN. 

TUE?. 

VVki.. 
Thitr. 
Frii). 
Sat. 

••usr. 

MoN 
TUKS. 

Wed. 
Thuk. 
Ikii). 

Sat 

MoN. 

TuKS. 

Wed. 

Thuk- 

Frid. 

Sat. 

SIN. 

MoN. 

TUES. 

Wed. 
Thuk. 



Weather Probabilities. 



!■ iir Ali.iii.eul.yuelncand 
j[ rt'^rions oK St I_.awrenee 
I and Ottawa Rivers. 



Cold. Frosty. 

Cold. Winter like. 

Rougrh, windy day. 

Cli'udy. 

Dull, damp d:iy. 

Rain or .si.ow. 

Unsettled. 

Cloiid.<. 

Variable. 

Damn, wet day. 

Unsettled. 

Blustery. Cool. 

Windy. 

(General frost. 

Change. 

Colder. 

Cold day. 

Cleariiitr. 

Changeable. 

Windy. 

Stormy da.v. 

Much wind. 

Change. 

Dnnii'. Disaereeable- 

Clearing. 

Change. 

Rainy. 

Clear. 

Fine day. 

Coiids 



Rises. 

i h.m. 

1 6 39 
6 41 
6 42 
6 4.3 
6 45 
6 46 
6 48 
6 49 
6 51 
6 52 
6 63 
6 55 
fi .56 
6 57 

6 59 

7 01) 
7 01 
7 03 
7 04 
7 05 
7 07 
7 08 
7 (9 
7 11 



Sun Xfoon 
Sets. Rises. 



>or iiironto Biid \'Tii\.\. 
iiice of Oniario, lying oii^ j 
and bet. the fireat" Lakes '; 



h.in. 

4 47 
4 45 
4 44 
4 42 
4 41 
i 40 
4 38 
4 37 
4 36 
4 35 
4 .34 
4 33 
4 32 
4 31 
4 30 
4 29 
4 28 
4 27 
4 20 
4 25 
4 24 
4 21 
4 23 
4 23 



7 12 


7 13 ' 


7 14 , 


7 16 


7 17 1 


7 18 



h. m. 

4 4(» 

5 .57 
7 07 
sets. 

6 02 

7 01 

8 08 

9 20 

10 ;^7 

11 54 
morn. 

1 12 

2 23 

3 42 

4 59 
6 12 
ris^es. 

5 18 

6 14 

7 13 

8 14 

9 17 

10 20 

11 24 
morn. 

-n 

1 26 

2 33 

3 40 

4 49 



un Sun Moon 
Kises. t>ets. Rises. 



h.m. 
fi 36 
6 37 
6 39 
6 40 
6 41 
6 43 
6 44 
6 46 
6 47 
6 48 
6 50 
6 51 
6 52 
6 54 
6 55 
6 56 
6 .=8 

6 59 

7 (HI 
7 01 
7 02 
7 03 
7 04 
7 06 
7 07 
7 08 
7 09 
7 10 
7 11 
7 1? 



h.m. 
4 



49 
48 
46 
45 
4 44 
4 43 
4 41 
4 40 
4 39 
4 ,38 
4 37 
4 .36 
4 35 
4 34 
4 33 
4 32 
4 31 
4 3(1 
4 ?0 
4 29 
4 28 
4 28 
4 27 
4 27 
4 26 
4 26 
4 25 
4 25 
4 24 



h. m. 

4 46 

5 .53 
7 00 
sets. 

6 09 

7 (8 

8 15 

9 26 

10 41 

11 f6 
morn. 

1 13 
? 22 

3 3!) 

4 54 
6 06 
rises. 

5 25 

6 21 

7 20 

8 21 

9 22 

10 24 

11 25 
morn. 

27 

1 25 

2 30 

3 36 

4 43 






ca.ca. 



M^-^tC B 



^^\ 2 






<: = = = z 



BROKEN PLEDGES 



XL -.JOBS. 

"Ring the knell of boodling, boys," was the burden of a Lilu'inl campaign 
song that pledged the Laurier party, when it got into power, to put an end to 
jobs of all kinds, great and small. 

The session of 1898 showed how irs spirit was not observed, after the party 
got into power. 

The Public Works Act provides that no contract shall be given out witliout 
public tender, and an Order-in-Council declares that for all works to cost over 
S.5,0()0 tenders must be asked. There is a Major's Hill Park at Ottawa, round 
which the Government decided to build a fence at a cost of .^14,000. To avoid 
asking for tenders, as the law required, the Government set down in the 
estimates for 1897 for the work a sum of .§4,500, and when those for 1898 came 
down, the same fence was down for another §4, .500. By dividing the total into 
small sums, Mr. Tarte was able to give the job to the man he liked, without liis 
profits being reduced by having to tender for it. 

When the Soulanges Canal was being built, Mr. Haggart, the minister in 
charge, was asked to use a certain kind of cement, and refuse<L because the 
quality was not good enough Mr. Blair succeeded Mr. Haggart, bought $20.0(X) 
worth of the cement, paid for it, and then had to discard it, because it was unfit 
to use for (-anal work. It was wasted. 



MERCHANTS BANK OF HALIFAX 

ltMCORF=ORAXED 1S6S. 

CAPITAL PAID-UP, $1,500,000. SURPLUS, $1,075,000 

HEAD OFFICE, - - HALIFAX, N.S. 

Montreal Branch— Bell Telephone Co.'s Building, Corner Notre Dame and 

St. John Streets. 
Montreal West End Branch— Notre Dame Street, Corner Seigneurs. 
Wkstmount Branch— Corner Green Avenue and St. Catherine Street. 

.. ..AGeiMCIES ... 

Antigonish, N.S.; Bathurst, N.B.; Bridgevvater, N.S.; Charlottetown, P.E.I. ; 
Dorchester, N.B.; Fredericton, N.B.; Guysborough, N.S.; Kingston, N.B.: Lon- 
donderry, N.S.; Lunenburg, N.S.; Maitland, N.S.; Moncton, N.B.; Xanaimo, 
B.C.; Nelson, B.C.; Newcastle, N.B.; Pictou, N.S.; Port Hawkesbury, N.S.; 
Rossland, B.C.; Sackville, N.B.; Shubenacadie, N.S.; St. John's, Ntld.; Summer- 
side, P.E.L; Sydney, C.B.; Truro, N.S.; Vancouver, B.C.; Victoria, B.C.; Wey- 
mouth, N.S.; Woodstock, N.B. 

....DIRECTORS... 

T. E. KENNY, President. THOMAS RITCHIE, Vice-President. 

MICHAEL DWYER, WILEY SMITH, H. G. BAULD, 

Hon. H. H. FULLER. 

D. H. DUNCAN, Cashier. W. B. TORRANCE, Assistant Cashier. 

Have excellent facilities for making collections throughout the Dominion. 
Interest allowed on Deposit-i in the Savings Department. 
Safe De])0sit boxes to rent at tlie Montreal Branches. 

THECANAOiANBANKOFCOMIVIERCE 

Paid-Up Capital, $6,000,000. Rest, SI, 000, 000. 

....DIRECTORS.... 

Hon. GEO. A. COX, President. EOBT. KILGOUE, Esq , Vice-President. 

"W B. HAMILIO-V, KsQ. JAS, CRATHEEN, JisQ. MATTHEW LEGGATT, Esq. 

J. W. FLAVELLK, Esq. JOHN HOSKIX, Q.C.. LL.T). 

B. E. WALKER. (iii>ii;il .Alauager. J. H. PLUMMKR, Asst. Gen. Manager. 

A. H. IRELAMJ, liisprctor. M. >[ORRIS, Asst. Inspector. 

BRANCHES OF THE BANK IN CANADA: 
Ontario— AjT, Biurii-. Belleville, Berlin, Blenheim, Branttoril. Cayuga, Cliatham. CoUinst- 
wood. Dresden, Bundas, Dimnville, (rait, Goderieli. Guelpli, Hamilton. London, Orangeville, 
Ottawa, Paris, Parkliill, I'eterboro, Port Perry, St. Catharines, Sarnia. Sault Ste. Marie. Se'aforth, 
Simcoe, Stratford, Stratliroy, Toronto, Toronto Jet., Walkerton, Walkerville. M'aterloo. Windsor, 
Wooodstock. Quebec— Montreal. Manitoba— Winnipeg, liritish Columbia— Vancouver, 
Fernio and Cranbrook. Yukon District — Dawson City. 

IN THE UNITED STATES: 

NEW YORK .... XKW ORLEANS- 

BANKERS IN GREAT BRITAIN: 

THE BANK OF SCOTliAXD - - - LONDON. 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

India, China and Japan — The Chartered Bank of India. Australia and China. German;/ — 
Deutsche Bank. i-^-onee— Lazard, Fr res A Cie., Paris. Hclriiinn—J. Matlhieu ,t Fils., Brussels. 
J/oHtUif?— liiseonto Maatsehappij. Aimfralia aad Xeir Zealand— Vnion Bank of Australia, Ltd. 
Smith A/»-/ca— Bank of Africa, Ltd. Standard Bank of South Africa, Ltd. South America — 
Lon.lon and Brazilian Bank, Ltd. British Bank of South America. Ltd. .Ifcjico— Banco do 
Jiondres y Mexico. Hermiida-ii:mk Bermuda, Hamilton. M'est Indies— Bank of Nova Scotia. 
Kiiijiston, Jamaica. Colonial Bank and Branches. British Col iimhia— Bunk of British Columbia. 
San /•'/•« lie i.'scn— Bank of British Columbia. New yorfe— American Exchange National Bank. 
C7iKV(;/o— North- Western National Uank. 







THE PEOPLES ALMANAC 29 


12th Month. DECEMBER, 1899. 31 Days. 








Fi)r Mi>iitrcnl.<^uei>pc and For Toronto nnil Hr.v- 


frilZ 




J3 


t^-^ 




rejjioris of Si. I.awrencel inceofOnlorio. lying on 


? = :;•» 


2 



>.w 


WEATilER PruBAIUI.ITIES. 


ni'd Ottawa Rivers. {I andhet. the (ireat Lakes.' 


A=s^ 


^ 






ii 


. 


'OBr^a 






Sun 


Sun Moon Sun 


Sun 


Moon 




5 








Rises. 


Sets. Rises. Rises. 


Sets. 


Rises. 




m 
>■ 








h.m. 


h.ni. b. in. h m. 


h.m. 


h. ni. 


1 


Frid. 


Unfettled. 


7 21 


4 18 


5 58 


7 14 


4 24 


5 51 




00 


2 


Satl'R 


Variable 


7 21 


4 17 


7 05 


7 15 


4 24 


6 58 


'.'.'.. 


CO 


3 


f*rx. 


1 Threatening. 


7 22 


4 17 


sets. 


7 16 


4 24 


sets. 


' '. ' ' 




4 


Mt)x. 


T>amp day. 


7 23 


4 17 


5 55 


7 17 


4 2:} 


6 02 






5 


TUF.S. 


Change. 


724 


4 17 i 7 08 


1 7 18 


4 23 


7 15 


^5?'!? 


en 


6 


Wed. 


1 UoFettled. 


7 2.5 


4 16 ! 8 25 


7 19 


4 23 


8 80 


P-M*^*^ 


H 
X 


7 


Thur. 


. Moderatiijp. 


7 26 


4 l^i i 9 43 


7 20 


4 2i 


9 46 


ooc^:^ 


2 


8 


Frid. 


I'ark, cloudy period. 


7 27 


4 16 1 11 02 


7 21 


4 23 


11 03 


a-p-=r=^ 


9 


Satir. 


Change. 


7 28 


4 16 j morn. 


7 22 


4 23 


morn. 


3i2wo5 


s 


10 


SUM. 


Windy. Rou.'ih. 


7 29 


4 16 


17 


' 7 Zi 


4 23 


16 


BB3B 


3 


11 


Mu.v. 


Cold, blustery day. 


7 30 


4 16 


1 29 


7 24 


4 23 


1 26 




> 


12 
13 
14 


T-'KS. 

Wkd. 
Thur. 


Change. 
Fro.'ity. Clear. 
' Cloudy- Snow. 


7 31 
7 32 
733 


4 16 
4 16 
4 17 


2 44 

3 o9 
5 09 


7 2i 

7 25 

, 7 26 


4 23 
4 23 
4 24 


2 40 

3 53 
5 02 


fo a fo a 
< < << 


as 


to — 


g 


15 


Frid. 


Snow storms. 


7 33 


4 17 


6 15 


7 27 


4 2+ 


6 08 


E^i-cs- 


H 


16 


Satcr 


1 .«f|ually. Cold. 


7 34 


4 IT 


rises - 


7 28 


4 -'4 


rises. 




S 


17 


SL'X. 


Chans>?. 


7 35 


4 18 


4 .i8 


7 28 


4 25 


5 05 


??^? 


g 


18 


Mo.v. 


Clouds. 


736 


4 18 


6 00 


7 29 


4 25 


6 07 


Ot cc ■*• 


SO 


19 


TuES. Cold, raw day. 


7 36 


4 19 


7 03 


729 


4 25 


708 


-1— COOO 

5SSB 


3 


20 


Wkd. 


Wintry- Cold. 


7 37 


4 19 


8 06 


7 30 


4 26 


8 10 


> 


21 


Thi-r. 


Change. 


7 37 


4 19 


9 10 


7 31 


4 26 


9 12 


222s 


? ! 


22 


Fkii). 


\'ariable. 


7 38 


4 20 


10 13 


;7 3i 


4 27 


10 14 


5 ^ ^ • 


_^ 1 


23 


Sati'r 


Milder. 


7 38 


4 '0 


11 13 


i 7 32 


4 27 


11 12 


' N? — 





24 


«l'X. 


Snow. 


7 39 


4 21 


morn. 


' 7 32 


4 28 


morn. 


B. — — a. 


? 


i5 


Mo.v. 


R.iin- Sleet. Snow. 


7 39 


4 22 


15 


17 32 


4 28 


13 


S 1 


26 


TuES. 


Unsettled 


7 40 


4 22 


1 22 


! 7 33 


429 


1 18 


3C :r. hiCJi 


S 


27 


Wed. 


Dauuiday. 


7 40 


4 23 


2 28 


i 7 33 


4 30 


2 23 


^zy:T^ 


28 


Thur. 


Windy. Cold. 


7 40 


4 24 


3 36 


1 7 34 


4 -"0 


3 ;!» 


rji^^i 


h 


29 


Frid. 


Cha.igeable. 


7 41 


4 24 


4 44 


,7 34 


4 31 


4 37 


= = 55 


5 , 


30 


Sati-r. 


Pad day. 


7 41 


4 25 


•ft 50 


734 


4 32 


5 43 


» a 


> 1 


31 


sux. 


Cloudy. Damp. 


7 41 


4 26 


6 50 


'7:^ 


4 33 


6 43 


< < f < 


? ' 




BROK 

XIL 


1 

:en pledges 


-CONTR.- 


II 
ICTS. , 




That a business administration would be the rule under a Liberal Govern- 


mer 


it was a pledge that has not been fulfilled. 




Parliament voted $11,000 for dredging at Coteau Landing. The work was 


giv< 


;n, without iiulilic tenders, to a Mr. Gauthier, a family friend of Mr. Tarte, 


u lio did not own a dred£z:e, and wlio sublet the work to a man who did, and made | 


a pi 


ofit thereby. His pay was -SS an hour for the use of the dredges. 




A Mr. Phin. a political friend of the ministry, got a dredging contract at i 


Tor 


onto under like circumstances. Mr. Phin did not own a dredge. 


bre< 


Mr. Da 
ikwate 


n McGillicuddy, a kicking Liberal of Goderich. trot a share in a .?(i0.000 1 1 


r contract, without public tei 


ders being asked. j 1 




"When S32,(KK) worth of supplies were needed for the Yukon military force. 


Dr. 


Jiorden, Minister of Militia, gave the contract by asking one tinn in each 


line 


of goods for its price, and defended his course by saying it gave him great 


pleasure to give contracts to his political friends when the price was right. By || 


not 


asking for competition he ensured that the price was right— for the friends. 



EASTCRII TOWNSHIPS BAMK 

KSXABLISHED 18o9. 

CAPITAL, $1,500,000. RESERVE FUMD, $835,000. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS : 

R. W. HEXEiiER, President. Hon. M. H. Cochrane, Vice-President. 

Israel Wood, T. J. 'J trcK, G. Stevens, .J. X. Galer, 

N. W. Thomas, C. H. Kathan, H. B. Brown, Q.C. 



HEAD OFKICE, - - SHERBROOKE, P. Q 

William Farwell, General Manager. 
S. Edcell, Local Manager. S. F. Morey, Inspector of Branches. 



BRANCHES : 

Waterloo, - - W. I. Briggs, Mgr. Granby, - - - W. H. Robinson, Mgr. 

Stan.stead, - - S. Stevens, Mgr. Bedford, - - E. W. Morgan, Mgr. 

Cowansville, - J. Mackinuon, Mgr. Huntingdon, - E. X. Robinson, Mgr. 

Coaticook, - - B. Austin, Mgr. Magog, - - - E. P. Olivier, Mgr. 

Richmond, ^- - W. L. Ball, Mgr. St. Hyacinthe, J. Lafraniboise, Mgr. 

Agents in Montreal — Bank of Montreal. London, Eng. — Xational Bank of 
Scotland. Boston— Xational Exchange Bank. Xew York— Xational Park Bank. 

Collections made at all accessible points. Drafts issued for any required 
amounts, good at all points in Canada, United Slates and Europe. Exchange 
bought and sold. 

SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT at each office. Interest allowed from 
date of deposit and compounded annually, without requiring the attention of 
the depositor. 



banque: villei-marie. 

Head Office, - - - MONTREAL. 

Capital Authorized, - $500,000. Capital Subscribed, - $500,000. 
Rest, $10,000. 

DIRECTORS— W. Weir. President .and Gciurnl Manager. E. Licbtenheim, Vice-President- 
A. S. C. Wurtele, F. W. Smith and Godfrey Weir ; F. Lemieux, Accountant. 

BRANCHES: 

Avonmore J.C.Smith, Manager Marieville J. D. Eergeron, Manager 

Berthier Nap. Dorvai, " Nicolet L. Belairi 

l.air6 Ctaboillez (city) Ormstown..P. H. M. Somerville, " 

Aug. Comte '" Papineauville C. Lessard, " 

Chambly II. Dartois, " Pt. St. Charles (city)W. J. E. Wall 

Ilochclaga (city) D.P. Hiopcl, " Rue St. Laurent (city) J. II- 

Lachine :0. Constatitineau, " Lefebvre " 

Lachute I. D Stewart, " St. Laurent 0. W. Legault, " 

Laprairie — T.J- Bourdeau, " St. Louis du Mile End (city) Art 

L'Epii«hanie R. Garidpy, " Pepin '' 

Longueuil-.-L. J. Normand, " Ste- ThCrdse H. 6. Rouleau " 

Aaentiat New York— The National Bank of the Republic and Ladenburg, Thalmann <t Co. 
London— Bank of Montreal. Porif— La Soci6te Gi5n^ralc 



THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 31 

THE ROYAL FAniLY. 

flF.B Ma.iesty ViOTOKrA, by the Orace of Ond, of the United Kingdom of (Jreit Britain and Ireland, Queen 
Dcfondi-r of the Faith. Emnress "of India (in India, Kaisar-i-Hinil), b.rn at Kensington Piilacc, 24th Mav, 181'J : 
suctccded to the Throne 20th Jnne, 183", on the death ot her uneli'. Kin:; William IV. ; crowned 28th .June, ln{8; ana 
married IMth February, 1.S40. to his late Koyal Hishiiess Franiis Albert Augustus Charles Enimanuei, Princf. 
Consort. Duke of Saxony, Prince of Coburg and Uotha, who was born 20th August, 1819, and died 14th December, 
18U1. ller Majesty lias had i,ssue- 

L H.LM. VicTOKiA, Empress Frederick of Germany, Princess Royal, b. Nov. 
21, ISIO ; m. Jan. 2."), I,s.>"^, to Fred erirk, Crown Prince of Prussia, afterw.trds 
German Emperor (b. Oct. IS, IKH, died June lo, LSSS), and lias had issue — William, 
reigniuR German Emjieror, b. Jan. 27, 1859, m. Feb. 27, 1S81, to Princess Augusta 
of Schleswiti-Holstein, and lias six sons and a daugliter ; Charlotte, b. July 24, 
18fi0, m. Fei). IS, 1S7S, to llered. Prince of Saxe-MeiniiiKen : Henry, born Aug. 14, 
18ii2, m. May 21, 1S8S, to his cousin. Princess Irene of Hesse ; Sigismund, b. Sept. 
15, 1S()4, d. June IS, ISOO : Victoria, b. Ajiril 12, ISfKJ. m. Nov. H), ISiX), to H.S.H. 
Prince Adolphe of Schaumburg-Lippe ; Waldemar, b. PVb. 10, 1S6S, d. March 27, 
1870 ; Sophia Dorothea, b. June 14, 1S7U, m. Oct. 27. 1SS!», to the Dukp of Sparta ; 
and Margaret, b. April 22, 1872. m. Jan. 25, 189:^, to Prince Fredk. of Hesse-Cassel. 

2. H.K.H. Alhkut Euwakd, Prince of Wales, b. Nov. 9, 1841 ; m. March 10, 
186^3, to the Princess Alexandra (b. Dec. 1, 1844>, eldest daughter of the King of 
Denmark, and has had issue— Albert \'ictor, Duke of Clarence, b. Jan. 8, 18(j4, d. 
Jan. 14, 1892: George Frederick, Duke of York, Captain R.x., b. June :3, ISCo, m. 
Julv(5, 1893. Princess Victoi ia :\Iarv C" IMav '") of Teck (b. Mav 2(i, 1807), and has 
had issue— Edward, b. June 23, 1894, and Albert, b. Dec. 14, 1895; Louise, b. Feb. 
20, 1867, ni. July 27, 1889, to the Duke of Fife— issue Alexandra, 1). Mav 17, 1891, 
and :\Iaud, b. Ajiril 3, 1893 ; Victoria, b. July G, 18(i8 ; Maud, b. Nov. 26, 1S(J9. m. 
22 July, 189(), to Charles, 2nd son of the Ci'own Prince of Denmark ; and Alex- 
ander,' b. April (5, d. April 7, 1871. 

3. H.R.H. Alice Maud Mary, b. April 25, 1843; m. July 1, 18fi2, to H.R.H. 
Louis IV., Grand Duke of Hesse (b. Sept. 12, 1837, d. March 13, 1892) ; d. Dec. 14, 
1878, her issue being — Victoria Alberta, b. Ajiril 5, 18(53, m. April 30, 18S4, to 
Prince Louis of Battenberg, R.x. ; Elizabeth, b. Nov. 1, 1864, m. June 15. 18S4, to 
the Grand Duke Serge or Russia ; Irene, b. July 11, 1860, m. May 24, 1.S88, to her 
cousin, Prince Henry of Prussia, brother of the German Emperor; Ernest Louis, 
Grand Duke of Hesse, b. Nov. 25, 1868, m. April 19, 1894, to H.R.A. Princess 
Victoria Melita of Saxe-Coburg ; Frederick, b. Oct. 7, 1870, d. June 27, 1873 ; Alix 
Victoria, b, June 6, 1872, m. Nov. 2(i, 1894, to H.LM. the Czar of Russia, and has 
issue, Olga, b. Nov. 15. 1895 ; and Mary, b. May 24, 1874. d. Nuv. 15, 1879. 

4. H.R.H. Ai.FKEU Ernest Albert, Duke of Edinburgh and Duke of Saxe- 
Coburg-Gotha, b. Aug. 6, 1844 : Admiral of the Fleet ; m. Jan. 23, 1874, to the 
Grand Duchess Marie of Russia (b. Oct. 17, 1853), and has issue— Alfred, b. Oct. 
15, 1874: Marie, b. Oct. 29, 1875, m. Jan. 10, 1893, to Ferdinand, Crown Prince of 
Roumania, and has issue — Carol, b. Oct. 15, 1893, and a daughter; Victoria 
Melita, b. Nov. 25, 1876, m. April 19. 1894, to Ernest Louis, (Jraiid Duke of Hesse, 
and has issue : Alexandra, b. Sept. 1, 1878, m. 1896, to Ernest, Hereditary Prince 
of Hohenlohe-Langenburg ; and Beatrice, b. April 20, 1884. 

5. H.R.H. Hki.kna Augusta Victoria, b. May 2.5, 1816; m. July 5, 1866, to 
Prince Frederick Christian C. A., of Sclileswig-Holstein (b. Jan. 22. 18:31), and 
has had issue— Christian V., Lt. Kind's Hov. Riiles, b. Apri' 14, 1807: AUtert J., 
b. Feb. 26, 1869; Victoria L., b. May 3. 1870"; Louise A., b. Aug. 12, 1872, m. July 
6, 1891, to Pr. Aribert of Anhalt ; and Harold, b. Mav 12, d. May 20, 1876. 

6. H.R.H. LouisK Caroline Alberta, b. March 18, 1^8; m. March 21, 1871, to 
John, Marquess of Lome (b. Auy-. 0, 1485). 

7. H.R.H. .A.UT1IUK W.P.A., Duke of Connaught, b. May 1, 1850; General in 
command at Aldershot ; m. March 13. 1879, Princess Louise ^largaret (b. July 
25, 1860), daughter of the late Prince Frederick Chas. of Prussia, and has issue — 
Margaret, b. Jan. 15, 1882 ; Arthur, b. Jan. 13, 1883 ; Victoria Patricia, b. March 
17, 1886. 

8. H.R.H. Lkopoi.T) G.D..\., Duke of Albanv, b. April 7, ISiW : m. April 27, 
ia82, to Princess Helen (b. Feb. 17, IWil), daughter of the late Prince George of 
Waldec, d. March 28, 1884. his issue being^AJice Marv, b. Feb. 25, 1883 ; Leopold 
Charles Edward G.A., Duke of Albanv, b. Julv 19, issi. 

9. H.R.H. Beathick Marv \'ictoria Feodora, l>. April 14,1857; m. Julv 23, 
18,S5, to Prince Henry Maurice of Battenberg (b. Oct. 5. 18.58; d. Jan. 20, 18<)6), 
and has issue — Alexander Albert, b. Nov. 23, 188() ; \'ictoria Eugt-nie Julia Ena, 
b. Oct. 24, 1887: Leopold Arthur Louis, b. .May 21. 1889; and Maurice Victor 
Donald. 1). Oct. 3, 1891. 



(jliardiat) - 



ESTABLISHED 1821 



Funds in hand exceed 

$23,000,000 



Fire ai}d Life AsSOraoce 
Co., LirQit^d. 

OF ENGLAND. 



Head Office in Canada: 

Guardian Assurance Building, 

181 ST. JAMES ST., 

MONTREAL. 



* 



E. p. HEATON, 

Manager. 



MONTREAL CITY AGENTS. -David Denne, Capt. Lawrence, G. Ross 
Robertson & Sons, C. F. Duranceau, Walter C. Hagar. 



NORTHERN 




Assurance Co. 



INCOME AND FUNDS, (1895.) 

Capita/ and Accumulated Fund, 

Annual Revenue from Fire Premiums, ----- -i 

Annual Revenue from Life Premiums, ----- L ^ 

Annual Revenue from Interest upon Invested Funds, ' ' J 

Deposited with Dominion Government, 



$38,355,000 

5,715,000 

200,000 



Head Office: LONDON AND ABERDEEN. 

Branch Office for Canada, i730 Notre Dame St., Montreal. 



THE PEOPLES ALMANAC 33 



THE BRITISH GOVERNMENT. 

(Formed June 29th, 1895.) 
Marquis of Salisburj— Prime Minister and Secretary of Foreign Department. 
Lord Halshury — Lord High Chancellor. 
Duke of Devonshire — Lord Pi-esident of Council. 
Viscount Cross— Lord Privy Seal. 

Sir Michael E. Hicks Beach— Chancellor of the Exchequer. 
Sir Matthew White Ridley— Secretary of Home Department. 
Mr. Joseph Chamberlain— Secretary of the Colonial Department. 
Marquis of Lansdowne— Secretary of War Department. 
Lord George Francis Hamilton— Secretary of Indian Department. 
Lord Balfour of Burleigh— Secrefary for Scotland. 
Mr. George J. Goschen— First Lord of the Admiralty. 
Mr. Arthur J. Balfour — First Lord of the Treasury. 
Earl of Cadogan— Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. 
Lord Ashbourne— Lord Chancellor of Ireland. 
Mr. Charles T. Ritchie— President of Board of Trade. 
Lord James of Hereford— Chancellor of Duchy of Lancaster. 
Mr. Henry Chaplin— President Local Government Board. 
Mr. Walter H. Long— President Board of Agriculture. 

(THE ABOVE FORM THE CABINET.) 

Mr. Aretas Akers Douglas — Secretary of Works and Public Buildings. 

Mr. Gerald Wm. Balfour — Chief Secretary for Ireland. 

Duke of Norfolk- Postmaster General. 

Sir John E. Gorst— Vice-President Committee of Council on Education. 

Henry Torrens Anstruther^ 

William Hayes Fisher. >Junior Lords of the Treasury. 

Lord Stanley. J 

Mr. Robert Wm. Hanbury— Financial-Secretary of Treasury. 

Sir William H. Walrond — Patronage Secretary of Treasury. 

Earl of Hopetoun— Paymaster-General. 

Sir Francis Hy. Jeune -Judge Advocate General. 

Admiral Sir Fred. Wm. Richards. 

Rear-Admiral Sir Fred. G. D. Bedford 

Rear-Admiral A. K. Wilson, C. B. 'Lords of Admiralty. 

Rear-Admiral Gerard H. Li. Noel 

Mr. J. Austen Chamberlain. > 

Mr. William G. E. Macartney— Parliamentary Secretary to Admiralty. 

Mr. Jesse Collings— Parliamentary Secretary to Home Oftice. 

Mr. William St. John F. Broderick— Parliamentary Sec. to Foreign Ottice. 

Earl of Selborne — Parliamentary Secretary to Colonial OfHce. 

Mr. George Wyndham— Parliamentary Secretary to War Ollice. 

Mr. Thos. W. Russell— Parliamentary Secretary to Local (Jovernment Board. 

Earl of Dudley- Parliamentary Secretary to Board of Trade. 

Mr. Joseph Powell Williams -Financial Secretary War Ollice. 

Sir Richard Webster— Attorney-General. 

Sir Robert Bannatyne Finlay— Solicitor-General. 2 



your signature to an applicaiion for Life Assurance, 
don't fail to see the BEST policies issued by the BEST 
Company — the policies issued by the EQUITABLE, which 
has the greatest strength of any Life Assurance Company 
in the world, its surplus amounting to ----- - 

$50,543.174. 

The EgoiTiiBLE Life limw Sogieiy 

OF THE UNITEP STATES, 

J AS. W. ALEXANDER, V.-P. H. B. HYDE, Pros. 

SEARGENT P. STEARNS, - Manager, 

157 St. James Street, Montreal. 

Assets, $236,876,308. Liabilities, $186,333,133. 



THE PEOPLES ALMANAC :in 



THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT. 

GOVEHN(»KGKNKK.'!iL. 

Right Honorable Gilbert John Elliot-Murray Kynynmoxo, B. A., P2nrl 
of Minto, Viscount Melgund ; born July 9th, 1815 ; married, ISfZi, Mary Caroline, 
daughter of General the Hon. Charles Grey; served as lieutenant in tiie Scots 
Guards; has been brigadier-general commanding South of Scotland infantry 
volunteers ; was a lieutenant-colonel of the Canadian militia during the Saskat- 
chewan campaign of 18<So ; served with the Turkish army in the war of 1877, and in 
the Afghan war of 1879, was secretary to Field Marslial Lord Roberts at Cape of 
Good Hope, 1881 ; volunteer in the Egyptian campaign, 18S2; military secretary to 
Governer-General the Marquis of Lansdowne, 188:3 85; chief of staff to Major 
General Middleton, 1885 ; Governor-General of Canada November, 1898. Salary 
£10,000 and residence. 

The Governor-Generals staff consists of Major L. G. Drummond, Scotti 
Guards, military secret^iry ; Lieut. W. F. Lascelles, Scots Guard^^, and Lieut. 
J. H. C. Graham, Coldstream Guards, aides-de-camp ; Arthur Guise, Esq., comp- 
troller of the household. 



THE CABINET. 

(Formed July 1:3th, 1896.) 

Right Hon. Sir Wilfrid Laukier, G. C. M. G.— Premier and President of the 

Council. 
Hon. Sir Richard Cartwright, G. C. M. G. Minister of Commerce. 
Hon. Richard Wm. Scott— Secretary of State. 
Hon. David Mii-Ls-Minister of Justice. 

Hon. Sir Louis H. Davies, K. C. M. G.— Minister of Marine and Fi^lieries. 
Hon. Frederick W. Bordex— Minister of Militia and Delence. 
Hon. Wm Mulock — Postmaster-General. 
Hon. Sydney A. Fisher — Minister of Agriculture. 
Hon. Joseph Israel Tarie— Minister of Public Works. 
Hon. Andrew G. Blair— Minister of Railways and Canals. 
Hon. Wm. S. Fielding— Minister of Finance. 
Hon. Clifford Sifton — Minister of the Interior. 

Hon. Sir Henry Gustave Joly de Lotbiniere— Minister of Inland Rever.ur. 
Hon. Wm. Paterson— Minister of Customs. 
Hon. R. R. DoBELL— Without portfolio. 
Hon. C. A. Geofrion— Without Portfolio. 

Hon. Charles Fitzpatrick— Solicitor-General. 



HIGH COMMISSIONER IN LONDON : 

The Right Honorable Lord Strathcona and Mount Roy.\l, Appointed April 

24th, ISSH). 
Secretary : -Joseph G. Colmer, C. M. G. 



ESTABLISHED 1825. 



The Standard . ,, Edinburgh, 



SCOTLAND. 



Life Assurance Co. 

HEAD OFFICE IN CANADA, MONTREAL. 



Total Assurance, - - $116,500,000 
Investments in Canada, - . 14,000,000 



Low Rates. Absolute Security. Unconditional Policies. 

Claims Settled immediately on Proof of Death 

and Title. No delays. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 



JAMES A. GILLESPIE, of Gillespie & Co., 
E. B. GREENSHIELDS, Director Bank of Montreal 
H. V. MEREDITH, Local Manager Bank of Montreal. 
ANGUS W. HOOPER, of Wm. Dow & Co., 



AGENCIES IN ALL PRINCIPAL TOWNS IN THE DOMINION. 



WM. M. RAMSAY, Manager. 

J. HUXTON BALKOUR, Seoretary. 
E. H. BROWN, Inspector, E. CHAriPAONE, Inspector. 



THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 31 



GOVERNMENT OF ONTARIO. 



Lieutenant-Governor. 

Hon. Sir Oliver Mowat, G.C.M.G. ; born at Kingston, July 22, 1820 ; married, 
June, 184(), Jane, daughter of John Ewart, of Toronto ; called to the Bar in 1S41 ; 
appointed Q.C. in 185fi ; made K.C.M.G., 1892, and G.C.M.G., 1897; was a mem- 
ber of the Canfederatioa Conference at Quebec, 1861 ; Postmaster-General of 
province of Canada, I860 to March 1864, and from June to November, 18(i4 ; 
Vice-Chancellor of I'pper Canada, 1864 to 1872 ; Premier of Ontario, 1872 till 
1896; Senator and Minister of Justice of Canada, July, 1896, till October, 1897, 
when appointed Lieutenant-Governor. Salary ^10,000 a year and residence. 

Executive Council. 

Hon. Arthur S. Hardy— Premier and Attorney-General. 

Hon. John Morrison Gibson— Commissioner of Crown Lands. 

Hon. Richard Harcourt — Treasurer. 

Hon. John Uryden — Commissioner of Agriculture. 

Hon. G. W. Ross— Commissioner of Education. 

Hon. Wm. Harty — Commissioner of Public Works. 

Hon. Elihu J. Davis — Secretary and Registrar. 

Hon. James T. Garrow — Without portfolio. 



GOVERNMENT OF QUEBEC. 



lilEUTEN ANT-GoATRNOR . 

Hon. Louis Amable Jette, Q.C, LL.D. ; born at L'Assomption, .Tan. 15, 1836 ; 
called to the bar 1862 ; elected to House of Commons for Montreal East 1872 ; 
appointed judge Superior Court, 1878, and Lieutenant-Governor .Jan. 20, 1898. 
Married, 1862, Berthe, daughter of Touissant Laflamme. Salary .^1(),000 and 
residence. 

Executive Council. 

(Formed May 1897.) 
Hon. F. G. Marcliand- Premier and Treasurer. 
Hon. Horace Archambault — Attorney-General. 
Hon. H. T. Duffy — Commissioner of Public Works. 
Hon. S. M. Parent— Commissioner of Lands, Forests and Fisheries. 
Hon. F. G. M. Dechone— Commissioner of Agriculture. 
Hon. Adelard Turgeon— Commissioner of Colonization aiul Mines. 
Hon. Joseph E. Robidou.\— Provincial Secretary. 
Hon. George W. Stephens Without Portfolio. 
Hon. Joseph Shehyn — Without Portfolio. 
Hon. James J. Guerin— Without Portfolio. . 



COMMERCIAL 



UlMIUN ASSURANCE COMPANY, 
Limited, of London, 
England. 



CAPITAL AND ASSETS, - $32,000,000 



Head Office : Canadian Branch, nontreal. 

JAMES McGregor, . manager. 

-®/§/l/©/l/l/ 

Special City Agents : 
NAPOLEON PICARD, F. M. COLE, JAS. M. MITCHELL, 

G. R. ROBERTSON & SONS, JOS. MAROIS, J. H. MOONEY. 



ECSTABLISHED ITSO. 



THE LONDON ASSURANCE 



TOTAL FUNDS, . . $20,000,000. 



CHIEFS OFM^IOE IIM CA.Wr-A.13A. 

1762 NOTRE DAME ST., MONTREAL. 

Insurance Against Loss by Fire at Current Rates. 

E. A. LILLY, General Agent. 



THE PEOPLES ALMANAC 39 



GOVERNMENT OF NOVA SCOTIA. 

LlEUTENANT-GoVEKNOK . 

Hon. Malachy Bowes Daly; horn at Marchmount, Quebec, fith February, 
1S36 ; married, 1859, Joanna, daughter of Sir Edward Kenny; MP. forJHaiifax, 
1878 to 1882; appointed Lieutenant-Governor 15th July, 1890, and re-appointed 
29th July, 1895. Salary $9,000 and residence. 

Executive Council. 

Hon. G. H. Murray — Premier, President of the Council and Provincial Sec- 
retary . 

Hon. J. W. Longley— Attorney-General and Commissioner of Crown Lands. 

Hon. Charles E. Church— Commissioner of Works and Mines. 

Thomas Johnson, A. H. Comeau, Angus McGillvray, D. McPherson and 
Thomas R. Black — Without Portfolio. 



GOVERNMENT OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 

LIEUTEXANT-GOVERXOR . 

Hon. Abner Reid McClelan, born at Hopewell, X. B., 4th*January, ISJil ; 
married Anna, daughter of W. J. Reed of Port Harvey ; was Chief Commissioner 
of Public Works for New Brunswick 1866 till Confederation, when calledlto the 
Senate ; appointed Lieutenant-Governor, January, 1897. Salary !g9,000. 

Executive Council. 

Hon. Henry R. Emmerson— Premier and Chief Commissioner of Public 
Works. 

Hon. Lenmel J. Tweedie— Provincial Secretary. 

Hon. A. S. White — Attornej-General. 

Hon. A. T. Dunn— Surveyor-General. 

Hon. Charles A. Labillois— Commissioner of Agriculture. 

Hon. L. P. Farris and Ambrose D. Richard, without Portfolio. 



GOVERNMENT OF MANITOBA. 



LlEUTENANT-GONERNOR. 

Hon. .Tames Colebrook Patterson, born at Armagh, Ireland, 1889; married 
Miss Elliott of Windsor, Out. : sat for Xorth Essex in Ontario Legislature 1875 to 
1878, and for House of Commons from 1878 till 1891, when jhe was returned for 
West Huron ; Secretary of State of Canada and Minister of .Militia!1892 till Sep- 
tember 2, 1S95, when appointed lieutenant-governor of Manitoba. Salary §10,000. 

Executive Council. 

Hon. Thomas Green way- Premier, President of the Couiicil, and Commis- 
sioner of Agriculture and Immigration and Railway Commissioner. 
Hon. Robert Watson— Comtnissiouer of I'ublic Works. 
Hon. John I). Cameron — Attorney-General and Lands Commissioner. 
Hon. Daniel II. McMillan- Provincial Treasurer. 
Hon. Charles .1. Mickle — Provincial Secretary and Municipal Commissioner. 



BEAVER LINE 

PASSENGER STEAMSHIPS 

SAILING BETWEEN 

MONTREAL and LIVERPOOL 



AND 



HALIFAX, N.S., ST. JOHN, N B. and LIVERPOOL 

DURING THE WINTER SEASON. 




S.S. Lake Ontario. S.S. Lake Superior. 

S.S. Lake Huron &c. 

Special facilities for the Carriage of Butter, Cheese, Eggs, Apples, &c. , Horses, 

and Sheep. 
Through Bills Lading to and from all points. 
Freight carefully handled with quickest despatch. 

These Steamers have Superior Accommodation for all classes of Passengers. 
Excellent Table and Good attendance. RATES OF PASSAGE VERY LOW. 

FOR FULL INFORMATIOX APPLY TO 



D. & C. MACIVER, 

Tower Buildings, 



D. W. CAMPBELL, 

General Manager, 



22 Water Street, Liverpool. 18 Hospital St , Montreal. 

OR ANY AGENT OF THE LINE. 



THE PEOPLES ALMANAC 41 



GOVERNMENT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Lieutenant-Governor. 

Hon. Thouuis Robert Mclnnes, M.U., horn at Lake Ainslie, X.S., November 
5th, L^'4(); educated at Truro, N.S., normal school and Harvard; married Mrs. 
\Vel)stcr, widow of (ieorgc M. Webster, of Dresden, Ont. ; was mayor of \ew 
Westminster, LSTfi-bSTS ; M,P. for New Westminster IMTStill IHSl, when appointed 
to Senate ; named Lieutenant-Governor November G, 18U7. Salary ¥9,001] and 
residence. 

Executive Council. 

Hon. C. A. Senilin— Premier and Commissioner of Public Works and Agri- 
culture. 

Hon. Joseph Martin— Attorney-General and Acting Commissioner of Educa- 
tion. 

Hon. F. C. Cotton— Commissioner of Finance. 

Hon. Fred. J. Hume — Provincial Secretary and Commissioner of Mines. 

Hon. II. McKechnie— President of the Executive Council. 



GOVERNMENT OF P. E. ISLAND. 

Lieutekant-Governor. 

Hon. George William Howland, bom at Waterford, Ireland. 19th May, iKir^ ; 
married, 18()6, Miss Olson, of St. John, N.B. ; 2nd, MiH8 Doran, of Kingston, 
Ont.; sat for first district of Prince in LegisLitive Assembly, lUCfZ to 1873 : called 
to the Senate Octol»er, 1873 ; appointed Lieutenant-Governor February l!4, bsi)4. 
Salary .'^57,000 and residence. 

Executive Couxcil, 

Hon. Donald Farquharson — Premier. 

Hon. H. C. McDonald— Attornej'-General. 

Hon. Angus McMillan— Provincial Secretary, Treasurer and Commissioner 
of Public Lands. 

Hon. James R. McLean— Commissioner of Public Works. 

Hoiis. J. W. Richards, Benj. Rogers, Peter McNutt, Anthony McLaughlin 
and Peter Sinclair — Witliout portfolio. 



GOVERNMENT N- W. TERRITORIES. 

LIEUTEXANT-GOVERNOI}. 

Amedee Emmanuel Foi'get, bom at Marieville, Que., N^ov. lii, 1847 ; appointed 
clerk N. W. Council 187(5, Assistant Indian Commissioner 1888, and Indian Com- 
missioner 18W5 ; married Miss Henriette Drolet ; appointed Lieutenant-Governor 

November 4, 18i>8. Salary .'ij;7,000 and residence. 

Exi'X'UTivK Council. 
Frederick W. HanUain-Attorney-General and Treasurer, 
•lames Hamilton Ross- Commissioner of I'ublic Works and Secretary. 
Ililliard Miichell, Charles A. Magrath- and George H. V. Bufyea— Without 
portfolio. 

GOVERNMENT OF THE YUKON. 

Commissioner of the Territory — Mr. William Ogllvie. 
(rold Commissioner— Mr. Edmtind Senkler. 
Registrar— Mr. Joseph E. Girouard. 
Crown I*rosecutor— Mr. W. H. P. Clement (acting). 
.Tiid!;e ol Territorial Court— Mr. Calixte A. Dugas. 



DOMINION LINE 



ROYAL MAIL 
STEAMSHIPS. 



Large and Fast Passenger Steamers. 

MONTREAL and QUEBEC, in Summer, 
ST. JOHN and HALIFAX, in Winter, 



TO 



LIVERPOOL via LONDONDERRY 




S.S. 



poniNION," 6,000 tons. 

Twin Screw. 



s.s. 



SCOTSriAN," 6,000 tons. 

Twin Screw. 



s.s. " LABRADOR," 5,000 tons. SS. " VANCOUVER, 5.000 tons. 

SALOONS AND STATEROOMS AMIDSHIPS. 

Superior accommodation for all classes of passengers at moderate rates. 
One thousand miles of River and Gulf smooth water sailing, after leaving 
Montreal, before the Atlantic is reached, making a very short sea passage. 
Halifax as a port of departure has the advantage of being 500 miles nearer 
Liverpool, than New York. 

BOSTON service: 

BOSTON to LIVERPOOL, via QUEENSTOWN, Fortnightly Sailings 

s.s. "NEW ENGLAND," 11,600 tons. 

TWIN St'REAV 

Length 575 Feet. 



§ 



S.S. -CANADA," 9,000 tons. 

twin screw 

Length 515 Feet. 



Palace Steamers of great speed, having all the appointments of a first- 
class hotel. 

First Cabin Rates, $.55. and upward.s. Second Cabin, $35. and upwards, 
according to steamer and berth. 

For further particulars, apply to any local agent of the Company, or 



RICHARDS, MILLS & CO., 

103 State Street, BOSTON. 



DAVID TORRANCE & CO.. 

General Agents, MONTREAL. 



THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 43 



THE POLITICAL HISTORY OF 1898. 



The appearance, on Januar}' 10, of tlie Pope's encyclical en the Manitoba 
school question was the first event of the year to awaken general interest in 
political affairs. The document, which bore date December 8, 1897, was 
addressed to the archbishops, bishops and other ordinaries of the Dominion of 
Canada having peace and communion with the Holy See. The moderation of its 
tone, coupled with the firmness with which it laid down the doctrines of the 
R. C. Church in regard to the education of the youth of its communion, gained 
for the letter greater attention than a more vigorously worded document might 
have secured. The Act of Confederation, it declared, had secured to Catholic 
children the right of education in public schools, in keeping with their conscien- 
tious convictions. The Legislature of Manitoba abolished this right bj* a con- 
trary law. By this latter law a grave injury was inflicted, "for it was not law- 
" ful for our children to seek the benefits of education in schools in which the 
" Catholic religion is ignored or actively combated and its fundamental princi- 
" pies repudiated." If the Roman Catholic church had anywhere permitted this, 
the document went on, it was only with great reluctance and in self-defence, and 
" after taking many precautions, which, however, have too often been found un- 
" equal to parrying the danger." 

In like manner, it was pointed out. Catholics " must at all cost avoid as most 
" pernicious those schools wherein every form of belief is indifferently admitted 
" and placed on an equal footing, as if in what regards God and divine things it 
" was of no importance whether one believed rightly or wrongly, whether one 
"followed truth or falsehood." All schools of this kind have been condemned 
by the Church, it was set out, " b( cause there can be nothing more pernicious or 
" more fitted to injure the integrity of faith and to turn away the tender minds 
" of youth from the truth." For the Catholic, it was declared, "there is but one 
"true religion, the Catholic religion; hence in all that concerns doctrine, or 
" morality or religion, he cannot recognize anything which is not drawn from the 

" very sources of Catholic teaching Hence the necessity of having 

" Catholic teachers, reading books and text books, approved of the bishops, and 
" liberty to organize the schools, that the teaching therein shall be in full accord 
" with the Catholic faith as well as with the duties that fiow therefrom. . 
"To decide in what institutions their children shall be instructed, who shall be 
"their teachers of morality, is aright inherent to parental authority. When, 
" then. Catholics demand that the teachings of the masters shall be in confor 
" mity with the religion of their children, they are only making use ot their 
" rights, and there can be nothing more unjust than to force on them the alter- 
" native of allowing their children to grow up in ignorance or expose them to 
" manifest danger in what concerns the supreme interest of their souls." 

The encyclical, after this, went on to say that when the law of Manitoba 
struck a blow at Catholic education it was the duty of the Catholic bishops to 
freely i)rotest against the injury and disaster infiicted. and the way in which 
they all f\ilfiiled that duty was a proof of their common vigilance, and of a spirit 
truly worthy of bishops. They had, moreover, in their conduct papal concur- 
rence and approbation. It was " deplorable," the encyclical said, that Catholic 
Canadians failed to unite as they should in defending those interests, " the im- 



44 THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 



" portance and gravity of which should have stilled .the voice of party politics, 
" which are of much less importance." 

The encyclical declared that the Holy See was not unaware that something 
had been done to amend the law. Certain measures had been taken with a view 
to decreasing the difficulties of which the Catholics of Manitoba complain and 
against which they continued to protest. The law to repair the injury, however, 
was declared "defective, unsuitable. Insufficient." The Catholics ask, and no 
one can deny that they justly ask, for much more. . . . "The rights of 
" Catholics and the education of their children have not been sufficiently provi- 
" ded for in Manitoba. Everything in this question demands and is conformable 
"to justice, and should be thoroughly provided for by placing in security and 
"surrounding with due safeguards those unchangable and sacred principles 
" spoken of. This should be the aim — this the end— to be zealously and pru- 
" dently sought for." 

The encyclical was so in keeping with the well understood doctrines of the 
Catholic Church, and so full an approval of the action of the Canadian bishops in 
connection with the school trouble, that it caused no surprise to Roman Catho- 
lics. Protestants, settled in their minds that the Manitoba school question was 
en4ed so far as legislation by Parliament is concerned, read the Pope's words — 
all with interest, some with sympathy. The general impression was that the 
publication of the document would have an injurious effect on the fortunes of the 
Government, whose members had in the preceding Parliament worked to pre- 
vent the passage of a bill in terms satisfactory to the R. C. bishops, and who had 
in conference with the Greenway Government in Manitoba agreed on the arrange 
ment which the bishops condemned and which the Pope said was insufficient. . 
This feeling was heightened also when it was asserted in the course of the debate 
in Parliament that members of the present Government, including the Premier, 
had made representations at Rome with the object of preventing the issuance of 
a papal utterance on the situation. Steps were taken by the ministers to 
arrange with the Manitoba Government for further concessions to the Catholics, 
which, however, lack the guarantee of legislative sanction, and are, to some ex- 
tent, a defiance of provincial legislative enactment. 



Parliament assembled on February 3, and almost immediately plunged into 
a discussion of the Yukon railway proposals of the Government, which had been 
outlined in the press before the session began. As introduced, the contract with 
Messrs. Wm. Mackenzie and D. D. Mann, which Parliament was asked to sanc- 
tion, provided for a railway from Glenbra, on the Stikine River, to the navigable 
waters of Teslin Lake, a distance of about 150 miles. The road was to be of nar- 
row gauge, of the general standard of the Kaslo and Slocan railway in British 
Columbia, and was to be so far completed by September 1 as to permit the carry- 
ing of freight and passengers. The company to be incorponvted by the bill was 
also to have power to extend the line northward to Dawson City and southward 
to a British Columbia ocean port ; also to construct a line of railwayfroni the Lynn 
Canal to Fort Selkirk, with branches to any lands owned by the company, either 
from the main line of the railway or from any navigable waters. The company 
was also to be given the right to build and operate steamships, docks, wharves 
and telegraph and telephone lines, necessary for carrying on its business. 



THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 45 

The Government, on its part, undertook that for five years from September, 
1)S<J8, no line of railway should be authorized by I'arliament from the Lynn Canal 
or thereabouts, or from any point on the Alaskan boundary, into the Yukon dis- 
trict, and that for live years no aid in land or money should lie granted to any 
one, other than the contractors, towards the building of such a railway. The 
contractors for ten years were also to have preference over any company or per- 
son in the matter of any aid granted by Parliament for a line of railway fiom the 
Stikine River to an ocean port in British Columbia. The contractors were to 
receive a land grant of 25,000 acres a mile (^i, 750,000 acres in all), to be selected in 
the Yukon provisional district and in that part of the Northwest Territories w'est 
of the Mackenzie and Liard rivers and north of the 60th parallel of latitude. The 
land was to be selected in blocks three miles square, laid out on base lines fixed 
by the contractors, along lakes, or streams, or otherwise, each alternate block 
being held by the Government. The Government was to receive a royalty of 1 
per cent, on all gold got by placer, or alluvial, or hydraulic mining, the royalty 
charged ordinary miners being 10 per cent. The land of the company was to be 
free from taxation for ten years. The rates for freight and passengers were not 
for ten years to be subject to the general law. 

The criticism of the arrangement was severe and prolonged. It was pointed 
out that the contract had been made without tenders being asked for, and that 
there was, therefore, no assurance that the terms were the best that could be 
arranged. It was claimed that the road, under the specifications provided, could 
be built for less than four million dollars, and that the land grant, under the cir- 
cumstances under which the contractors were to be permitted to locate it, was 
calculated to be worth many times this amount, as it could be arranged to take 
in the best mineral sections in the country. The Government later acted in a 
manner to somewhat justify this assertion, by fixing the sale price of lands in 
the Y'ukon district at $10 an acre and limiting to 40 acres the amount that could 
be purchased by one person in one locality. It was also shown that the line 
would not provide an all-Canadian route to the Y^ukon, the Stikine River, which 
had to be used in getting from the sea to Glenora, running for thirty miles 
through U. S. territory, and having its mouth, where transfer from ocean steam- 
ships to barges would have to be made, under U. S. jurisdiction. 

As a result of the criticism in Parliament and the press several important 
modifications were made in the terms and embodied in a supplementary contract. 
The company's privileges in the selection of its land grant were reduced ; security 
was provided for the operation of the road after it was constructed, and a clause 
was inserted to the effect that no member of the House of Commons should be 
admitted to any share in the contract. Before this was announced in Parlia- 
ment, however, Mr. Hamilton Smith, representing an English syndicate, had 
offered to construct a line of railway of 8 feet gauge, from Pyramid Harbor to 
Rink Rapids, a distance of about 288 miles, on condition that the Government 
would for five years give no other charter for a road from the Lynn Canal to the 
interior, should authorize for that term proper traffic rates, and give the con- 
tractors a land grant of (5,400 acres per mile, in all about 1,840,000 acres. This 
offer the Government would not entertain. When the discussion was at its 
warmest the Government proposed an adjournment from February 22 till March 
1, to permit of members taking part in the Ontario provincial election campaign. 
On the latter date the debate was resumed, and on March 4, Mr. Borden (Halifax) 



46 THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 



moved an amendment to the motion for the second reading of the bill to confirm 
the contract, to the effect that the House, while recognizing the necessity of pro- 
viding adequate facilities for transportation into the Canadian Yukon gold fields, 
regarded as indefensible the terms and conditions of the proposed contract, but 
would coidially support the grant of substantial assistance in aid of the imme- 
diate construction of a railway on the best available route, under such conditions 
and safeguards as would prevent the creation of any railway or mining 
monopoly. 

The division took place at 5 o'clock a. m. on March 11. Mr. Borden's amend- 
ment was defeated by a vote of 65 to 119, and the second reading of the bill was 
carried by a vote of 111 to 72, a majority of 39. In the latter division four 
Liberals, Messrs. Mclnnes, Rogers, Oliver and Erb, voted against the Govern- 
ment. After this the bill was allowed to go through committee of the House of 
Commons without division. Its fate was sealed, however. In the Senate the 
debate began on March 22. Senator Macdonald moved the six months" hoist, and 
on March 'AO a division took place, when the bill was killed on a vote of 52 to 14. 
The minority included one Conservative, Mr. Dobson, and one Independent, Mr. 
Snowball. The Government, in keeping with the spirit of the defeated measure, 
later re>-isted and prevented the passage of a bill to charter the road suggested in 
Mr. Hamilton Smith's pi'oposition. 



The Kettle Valley Railway charter was the subject of another sharp strug- 
gle. It was opposed on the ground that its construction would give the control 
of the Boundary Creek, B. C, district traffic to U. S. roads, in which Mr. Austin 
Corbin, the promoter, was interested. A motion to reject the preamble, and 
thus kill the bill, was defeated in the Railway Committee of the House of Com- 
mons on a vote of -18 to 54. In the House itself, however, the situation was 
reversed, and on April 13 the bill was killed on a division of 44 to 64, in which 
Mr. Tarte and Mr. Blair took opposite sides, the former practically leading in 
the opposition to the bill, which Mr. Blair supported. 



The motion that the House of Commons should go into Committee of Supply 
was nioved on April 5, more than two months after the opening of the session. 
Mr. Fielding's second budget speech, like his first, was lengthy. It announced, 
besiiles the Fiiianci! Minister's ideas in regard to the revenue and expenditure, 
a change in the preferential clause of the tariff. This had been foreseen by the 
Opposition, the leiders of which, izi the session of 1897, when the preferential 
tarilf surprise was sprung on the country, had pointt d out that, under the terms 
of the British trade treaties, any tariff concession made by a colony to the mother 
country would also have to be made to the countries with which the motlier 
country had treaties containing the " most favored nation clause." This position 
was ridiculed by the ministers at the time, but events sho« ed that it was the 
right one, and, besides Germany and Belgium, the Government issued orders 
giving to some twenty other countries the concession of J and J reduction in 
duties it intended at first only for Great Britain. The budget resolutions con- 
tainrd a ivevv preferential provision, limited in oueration to Great Britain and 
certain colonies specified, or to other colonies to which it might be deemed wise 



THE PEOPLES ALMANAC 47 



to extend it. The clause enacts a reduction of 25 per cent, in the ordinary duties 
on articles imported from : 

"(f) The United Kingdom. 

"(/'> The Britisli colony of Bermuda. 

"(c) The British colonies commonly called the British West Indies, includ- 
ing the following : The Bahamas, .Jamaica, Turk's Island and the Caicos Islands, 
the Leeward Islands (Antigua, St. ('hristopher, Nevis, Dominica, Montserrat, 
and the Virgin Islands), the Windward Islands (Grenada, Sc. Vincent and St. 
Lucia), Barbadoes, Trinidad, and Tobago. 

" (f/) British Guiana. 

" (c) Any other British Colony or possession the customs tariff of which, is on 
the whole, as favorable to Canada as the British preferential tariff" herein 
referred to is to such colony or posssesion. 

" Provided, however, that manufactured articles to be admitted under such 
preferential tariff shall be bona, fid r the manufactures of a country or countries 
entitled to the benefits of such tariff, and that such benefits shall not extend to 
the importation of articles into the production of which there has not entered a 
substantial portion of the labor of such countries. Anj- question arising as to 
any article being entitled to such benefits shall be decided by the Minister of 
Customs, whose decision shall be final." 

Raw sugar, it was also provided, may "when imported direct from any 
British colony or posse -sion, be entered for duty or taken out of warehouse for 
consumption in Canada at the reduced rate of duty provided in the British pre- 
ferential tariff." 

The Minister of Customs was given power, with the approval of the Governor- 
General in Council, to fix what colonies shall come in under sub-section d. Later 
under this authority, the preference was extended to merchandise from New 
South Wales, British India, Ceylon and the Straits Settlements. 

It was especially provided, however, that the reduction shall not apply under 
any circumstances to wines, malt liquors, spirits, spirituous liquors, liquid medi- 
cines and articles containing alcohol, tobaccos, ci.ars and cigarettes. 

A change was also announced in the sugar and tobacco duties, according to 
the following : 

All feugar above number sixteen Dutch standard in color, and all refined 
sugars of whatever kinds, grades or standards, testing not more than eighty- 
eight degrees by the polariscope, $1.08 per one hundred pounds, and for each 
additional degree one and one-half cents per one hundred pounds. 

"Sugar, n. e. s., not above number sixteen Dutch standard in color, sugar 
drainings or pumpings drained in transit, melado or concentrated melado, tank 
bottoms and sugar concrete, testing not more than seventy-five degrees by the 
polariscope, 40c. per one hundred pounds, and for each additional degree one and 
one-half cents per one hundred pounds." 

In the case of the first class the previous duty was one cent per pound, irre- 
spective of standard, and in the second class Ik-, per pound. The general efiect 
of the change, whicli involved an alteration in the mode of levying duties, was to 
decrease the difference in dutj' between refined and raw sugar, and, to the same 
extent, to reduce the protection to Canadian manufacturers and Canadian labor. 



In regard to the revenue for the year then current (1897-98) Mr. Fielding, anti- 
cipated that it would reach §:i!»,:iOO,(IOO. The expenditure on Consolidated Fund 
accourt he calculated would be .S;i8,7.50,{K)0, showing a surplus of §iViO,t)0(». The 
result \< as rather better than the minister's anticipations, as the revenue came 



48 THE PEOPLES ALMANAC 



up to f 40,275,704, and the expenditure was only §38,699,823. The surplus (taking 
off account of the " capital " or borrowed money expenditure, on public works, 
etc. was $1,575,88L 



The Drummond County Railway matter was brought up early in the session. 
Sir Mackenzie Bowell, in the Senate, on February 14, moved for a special com- 
mittee to enquire into the finances of the company and all matters appertaining, 
to the arrangement with the Government. The committee was granted ; but as 
the House of Commons, at the in-^tance of the Government, also appointed a com- 
mittee with like powers, it fell to the latter to carry out the enquiry. The com- 
mittee consisted of Messrs. Lister, Carrol, Mclsaac and Morrison, Liberals, 
and Haggart, Borden and Powell, Conservatives. Mr. Lister was selected as 
chairman. The evidence was long and some of it was interesting. Mr. Samuel 
Newton, the secretary of the company, gave the cost of the road up to the 28th 
February as $1,JK)8,27L The company was under obligation to spend $100,000 to 
bring the road up to the required standard. Sums aggregating §650,416 were 
received as subsidies or bonuses from governments and municipalities. The net 
expenditure of the company's funds on the road, which was built by members of 
the company for the company, would therefore be .*! 1,3.57, 8.55. The amended 
agreement, under which tlie road is now operated by the Government, provides 
for its purchase by the Government, for a sum of $1,600,000 cash, when Parlia- 
ment consents to vote the money. It was shown that in July, 1894, the share- 
holders had agreed to transfer the line, as it then stood, completed from St. 
Rosalie to Nicolet (62^ miles), with some work done on an extension from St. 
Leonard towards Chaudiere, for a sum of '5.500,000. Mr. Farwell, in turn, trans- 
ferred his rights under the agreement to Mr. Hugh Ryan, of Toronto. Mr. 
Greenshields got one-fifth of the stock for $24,000. One first class and one second 
class car served for the passenger traflBc of 90 miles of track. The road's average 
net earnings were about $33,000 a year. 

One feature of the investigation concerned the understood connection be- 
tween the arrangement to buy the line and the purchase of Iai Pafrie as a Gk)v- 
ernment organ in the Montreal district. During the session of 1897, Mr. Tarte 
had decliired that, at Sir Wilfrid Laurier's request, he had undertaken to secure 
a newspaper organ in Montreal, and had arranged with Mr. J. N. Greenshields, 
the president of the Drummond County Railway Company, to act as purchaser 
of La Patrie. Mr. Tarte added that with the money of the party, Mr. Green- 
shields bad paid for the paper, which was and is controlled by members of Mr. 
Tarte's family. Mr. Greenshields, giving his testimony before the committee, 
declared that in no instance was one single dollar, either directly or indirectly, of 
the Drummond County Rivilway, or of his own, given to Mr. Tarte, or to his sons 
or to La Patrie. He gave his cheque for .$20,0(X) to pay for the paper, it was true, 
but this was merely to accommodate Mr. Tarte. Mr. Tarte paid him §5,000 the 
same afternoon, and the next morning Mr. Tarte's sons handed him §15,000. Mr. 
Tarte gave evidence to the same efiect. 



The Government during the session carried out its threat to abolish the 
Dominion Franchise Act, and substituted for the uniform federal franchise 



THE PEOPLES ALMANAC 49 



those of the various provinces. The bill for the purpose was warmly opposed by 
the Conservative opposition, and considerably amended in the course of the 
debates, both in the House of Commons and in the Senate, with which latter 
body, for a time, it looked as if there would be a confiict, its majority having 
insisted on a number of amendments deemed necessary to secure the rights of 
political minoi'ities in provinces where the local enactments were either defective 
or unfairly administered. A promise on behalf of ministers, that influence would 
be used to have the causes of the grievances removed, ended the difficulty. 



The Plebiscite Bill, for the purpose of taking a popular vote on the question 
of abolishing the importation, manufacture and sale of intoxicating' liquor, for 
beverage purposes, was allowed to pass without much opposition. Its reception 
showed, however, that there were many Plebiscitists who were not Prohibition- 
ists, a fact made more evident during the campaign preceding polling day (Sep- 
tember 29), in which two ministers, Sir Henri Joly de Lotbiniere and Mr. 
Geofirion, spoke openly against prohibition, while, in Quebec especially, the 
Liberal press, including La Pafrie, the organ purchased at the Premier's instiga- 
tion, was strongly anti-prohibitionist. The result was a remarkably large " No " 
vote in Quebec, which brought the " Yes " nuijorities in the other provinces 
down to between twelve and thirteen thousand. On the strength of this major- 
ity a prohibition deputation, on November!^, waited on the Government to urge 
action on the plebiscite by way of introducing a prohibition bill in Parliament. 
Sir Wilfrid Laurier intimated that the arguments of the delegates would be con- 
sidered by the Privy Council and the result made known to the secretary of the 
Dominion Alliance. 



A proposal, which some associated with the negotiations for the better treat- 
ment of the Roman Catholics of Manitoba in regard to their schools, was made 
to pay to the Government of Manitoba a sum of .$300,000 out of the school fund 
held in trust b}' the Dominion for the province. This fund has been created by 
the sale of lands in Manitoba set apart for the purpose at Confederation, and held 
by the Government of Canada. The proposal met with strong opposition, it be- 
ing pointed out that there was no security that the money would be used for 
educational purposes if handed over to the provincial administration, which was 
in a financial position to tempt it to divert the sum to other uses, to the disad- 
vantage of the cause of education. It was also claimed that such a payment 
would be contrary to the law creating the fund, which contemplated that the in- 
terest only should be disbursed by the province. The payment proposed was 
out of the capital of the fund. The bill to legalize the transaction passed the 
House of Commons,, but was defeated in the Senate on a vote of 28 to 7. 



An incident that led to some unpleasantness was the resignation of Mr. 
Bruneau. M.P. for Richelieu. Several caucuses of the Government supporters 
were held during the session, at which, report had it, the questions of appoint- 
ments to office and railway subsidies were freely discussed and some sharp 
things said about the Government's course in regard thereto. Mr. Bruneau, 



50 THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 

among others, it was understood, posed as a critic, and to give effect to his cen- 
sure, sent his resignation to the Speaker. The rest of the incident is explained 
in the Speaker's words, from the chair, on March 14. He said : 

" Before calling the orders of the day I would like to mention to the House 
a matter which is of the nature of privilege, and which, I see, has been connected 
by the press with the seat of an honorable member, the member fur Richelieu. 
It is stated that I have received his resignation. If I had received his resigna- 
tion I should have issued ray warrant for a new election before now. The only 
occasion when I have had any communication from or with Mr. Bruneau this 
session was on Friday morning. I had just come into my office when Mr. 
Bruneau came in. He asked me if I had received a letter from him. I told him 
I had not. He said that he had called to get a letter back which he had written 
to me. I told him to wait and I would look among my mail, for I had not yet 
opened my letters. I turned the unopened letters over in his presence, and he 
pointed to one with his frank upon it. I asked him if it was his writing on the 
address and frank. He assured me it was. He told me nothing of its contents, 
and I asked him nothing, but handed him the letter unopened, and he took it 
away with him. So far as I know, it had come to my office tlirough the post 
office, for I had not seen it before. I mention this to avoid any mistake as to 
facts as far as I am concerned." 

It was asserted that, having sent in his resignation to the Speaker, an officer 
of the House of Commons, it was improper for Mr. Bruneau to recall it ; but the 
Speaker's way of dealing with his mail made it impractical)le to go further with 
the case. Mr. Brvineau did not say what his letter contained. 



The long threatened superannuation system was dealt with during the ses- 
sion. In 1871 a system of superannuation for public employees was established, 
by which a percentage of their annual pay was withheld for the superannuation 
fund, out of which the Government bound itself to pay those retiring from the 
service after a fixed period an annual allowance based on the length of their em- 
ployment. The abuse of the system, coupled with miscalculations as to the 
amount of the charges, resulted in the gradual growth of the superannuation 
expenditures, till, in 1897, they amounted to $307,793. The receipts the same 
year were only f 59,218. The new law, applying to all future appointments, with- 
holds 5 per cent, from the officials' salaries, which is to be returned to them, with 
interest at 4 per cent, on their quitting the service. 



Some postal changes of interest occurred during the year. One was the im- 
position of a postage rate on daily and semi-weekly newspapers, mailed from the 
office of publication. Another was the institution of a special delivery .system, 
by which, through the use of a special 10 cent stamp the delivery of a letter as 
soon as received at the office of destination, is promised. The most important, 
however, was the putting into force at Christmas of a 2 cent rate on letters to 
Great Britain, the result of Mr. Mulock's summer visit to Elngland and the meet- 
ing of the Imperial Postal Conference. 



On August 23 there assembled at Quebec a conference to consider matters 
that had led to differences of opinion between Canada and the United States. 
Great Britain was represented by ex-Lord Chancelloi', Baron Herschell, with 



THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 51 

Sir Wilfrid Laurier, Sir Richard Cartwright, Sir Louis H. Davies, Mr. Charlton, 
M.P., and Sir James Winter, of Newfoundland. The U. S. cotnniissioners were 
Senators Gray, Fairbanks and Kasson, Conf^rfssnian Nelson Din^ley, anrl Messrs. 
John W. Foster and T. .Jeflerson Coolidf<e. Senator Faulkner, of West \'irf^inia, 
replaced Senator Gray in September, Mr. Gray going to Paris as one of the com- 
missioners to fix the terms of peace with Spain. The matters of reference were : 

1. Questions in respect to the fur seals in Behring sea and the waters of the 
North Pacili'- ocean. 

2. Piovisioiis in respect to fisheries off the Atlantic and Pacific coasts and 
on the great lakes. 

8. Provisions for the delimitation and establishment of the Alaskan-Canadian 
boundary. 

4. Provisions for the transit of merchandise in transportation to or from 
either counti y, across intermediate territory of the other. 

o. Provisions relating to the transit of merchandise from one country to be 
delivered at points in the oth^r beyond the frontier. 

(i. The (|uestion of the alien labor laws. 

7. The mining rights of the citizens of each country within the territory of 
the other. 

K Such adjustments as may be deemed mutually advantageous of customs 
duties, applicable in each country to the products of the soil or the industries of 
the other, upon the basis of reciprocal equivalents. 

!). A revision of the agreement of 1817, respecting naval vessels on the 
lakes. 

10. Arrangements for the more complete definition and demarcation of any 
part of the frontier line where the same is now insufficiently defined. 

11. Provisions for the conveyance for trial or punishment of persons in the 
lawful custody of the officers of one country through the territory of the other. 

12. Reciprocity in wrecking and salvage rights. 

After several meetings and adjournments, interspersed with much social 
festivity, the conference adjourned on October 7 to meet at Washington on Nov- 
ember 10, when the negotiations were continued. 



In provincial politics the leading event of the year was the Ontario general 
election. Mr. Hardy, who succeeded Sir Oliver Mowat in the premiership, dis- 
solved the Legislature early in the year and fixed the polling for March 1. The 
Opposition, led by Mr. Whitney, made a spirited fight. The result was a consid" 
erable increase in the Opposition strength, the practical disapi)earance of the 
Patrons of Industry from representation, and a reduction of the Liberal member- 
ship so that when the Legislature met in August the Government majority was 
only six, one of its supporters, however, being absent through illness. This ses- 
sion was something of a surprise. An unusual number of petitions were entered 
against the successful candidates. In some of them th« question was indirectly 
raised as to the right to vote of special constables, appointed and paid to keep 
order at the polls, under a provision of the statutes that disfranchised persons 
receiving pay for services rendered during the election. Several seats, it was 
understood, if not the Governm-Mit majority, depended on the result of the 
court's consideration. At first it was proposed by the Government to refer the 
(|uest,ion to the Court of Appeal, and abide by the issue, and ((uestions were pre- 
l)ared and submitted to the court for its opinion. Before this opinion was ren- 
dered, however, another course was adopted, and the liCgislature was sum- 
moned, for the purpose, it was ofiicially stated, of passing an act declaring that 



52 THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 

the constables in question had and always had had the right to vote. This deci- 
sion was, in its turn, changed, and the bill actually passed, by a straight party 
vote, provided that if, as the result of an election trial, any member was unseated 
because of the disallowance of the votes of the election constables in question, or 
partly for that reason and partly for some other reason, the seat should not be 
given to the opposing candidate, in conformity with the existing law, but that 
the election should be declared void, and that thereafter a new election should be 
held. This was naturally pronounced an extraordinary proposition; but the 
majority accepted it, and it became the law of the province. The Legislature 
adjourned till the ordinary time of holding the session. Then the Court of Ap- 
peal decided that there was no need for the session and the legislation enacted 
thereat, by holding that special election constables did not come within the cate- 
gory of persons excluded from the right to vote. The announcement was 
received with much satisfaction by the Government's friends. But fate had an- 
other rebuff for Mj-. Hardy. The representation of South Ontario had become 
vacant, and the writ for a new election was issued. The Liberal candidate was 
Mr. Dryden, commissioner of agriculture, who had been defeated in the general 
contest. The campaign was begun, when a letter signed " Lex," in the columns 
of the Toronto World, drew attention to the clause in the statutes which declared 
that no bye-election to fill a vacancy caused by the unseating of a member should 
be held during a session of the Legislature. The Legislature was legally in ses- 
sion. The writ for South Ontario was non-effective, and had to be recalled. To 
get out of the difficulty its own legislation had brought it into, the GoveriTment 
got Sir Oliver Mowat, the Lieutenant-Governor, to stretch his prerogative and 
px'orogue the Legislature. Then a new writ was issued, and, for the time, the 
chapter of blunders ended. During the recess, Mr. Gibson, commissioner of 
crown lands, and Mr. Dryden, commissioner of agriculture, who had been 
defeated in their constituencies on March 1, obtained seats, Mr. Gibson in East 
Wellington, which had been made vacant by the death of Mr. Craig, and Mr. 
Dryden in South Ontario, vacated by the election courts. 



British Columbia added to the interest of the political history of the year. 
The general elections to the Legislature were held in July, and resulted in an 
even division of the representation between Government and Opposition support- 
ers. Without waiting for the official return, Lieutenant-Governor Mclnnes 
interpreted the situation as evidence of popular want of confidence in his advi- 
sers, and dismissed Mr. J. H. Turner, the premier. The Government was generally 
counted Conservative, though some of its supporters were Liberals ard its oppo- 
nents were not all of that party. The dismissal caused some surprise, which was 
increased by the fact that the Lieutenant-Governor did not send for Mr. Semlin, 
the leader of the opposition to the Turner Government, but for Mr. Robert 
Beaven, a former minister, without a seat in the Legislature. The t^vsk was 
too much for Mr. Beaven, however, and he gave it up. Then Mr. Semlin, who is 
a Consevative, was sent for, and with Mr. Joseph Martin, of Manitoba school law 
fame, as a lieutenant, he formed a new ministry. 

The crisis had as one of its features the publication of a number of letters 
passing between the Lieutenant-Governor and Mr. Turner, and the making of 
charges that the Lieutenant-Governor sought to use his position to compel the 



THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 53 



taking into the Cabinet of his son, Mr. W. W. B. Mclnnes, M.P. In a letter of 
July 14 Lieutenant-Governor Molnnes informed the premier, Mr. Turner, that 
he could not look on the election as other than adverse to the administration and 
an expression of want of contadence on the part of the people, and that he could 
not longer accept the advice of his ministers in regard to new appointments to 
office, or iu regard to any special expenditures of money not provided for in the 
current estimates, unless shown that an urgent necessity existed for them in the 
interests of the province. In a letter of July 25 the Lieutenant-Governor declined 
to sanction a change of date for polling at some of the stations in theCassiar 
district, wliere, owing to geographical conditions, polling day had been fixed 
later than in the other constituencies. On the 8th of August the Lieutenant- 
Governor again wrote to Mr. Turner, recalling the position he had taken in his 
former communication in regard to appointments and the expenditure of public 
money, and saying that he had not wished to take decided action till all the 
writs were returned. Since writing that letter, however, the Lieutenant- 
Governor added, the representations made to him by Mr. Turner and colleagues, 
in regard to the expenditures of various sums of money, had influenced him to 
the extent that he would no longer await the return of rhe Cassiar writs before 
acting on what be considered the verdict of the electorate, as further delay in 
calling a ministry in which he could have full confidence might prejudicially 
affect the interests of the province. Mention was made of the sending to him 
of warrants and orders in council in regard to which he had withheld his appro- 
val, as he considered them outside of routine business, and in regard to none of 
them could he see that a delay of a few weeks would make any material differ- 
ence to the localities concerned or to the province at large. Feeling the respon- 
sibilities resting upon him, and that Mr. Turner and his colleagues were no 
longer endorsed by the electorate, and had not the confidence of the Legislature, 
he had decided to delay no longer in calling for other advisers. He would not 
feel justified, he said, in granting another dissolution, and would not put the 
province to the delay or expense of a special session of the Legislature. He asked 
for his ministers' resignations. 

Mr. Turner's reply recited the substance of the letters summarised above, and 
asserted that the expenditures he had recommended were justified under the 
law, and that the orders in council submitted were reasonable and in the public 
interest. Mr. Turner's letter referred to a visit paid to him on July 18 by Mr. T. 
R. E. Mclnnes, son of and private secretary to the Lieutenant-Governor, who had 
referred to the latter's letter of July 11, and then went on : — 

" He (Mr. T. R. E. Mclnnes), then went on to say that there was a method by 
which I could secure a strong government, that owing to the fact that some par- 
ties who had taken a very active part against the Government in the late elec- 
tions, being somewhat nervous now about the real position of allairs in the pro- 
vince, particularly with respect to the preponderance of Mainland intluence and 
the consequent danger of the rights of the Island being neglected, they, or he, 
had arrived at the opinion that it would be well to back me up by support from 
some of the members who had been elected to supj)ort the oppo.sition ; and he 
desired to let me know that his brother. W. W. B. Mclnnes, M.l\. could carry 
out an arrangement of tliat kind. He (W. \\'. B. Mclnnes) was prepared to 
resign his seat in the Commons and enter into local politics. He was really a 
friend of mine, and fully supi)orted most of my policy, more particularly that of 
railways, agriculture and finance. He would, however, want a seat in the 
cabinet, and if I were inclined to give him that, he was (piite sure he could bring 
over two of the present opposition Island members to my sujjport in addition to 



54 THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 

his own. This would give me, in the event of Cassiar being favorable to my gov- 
ernment, at least 21 or 22 government supporters, and I should, he thought, have 
little difficulty in getting over one or two more, thus securing a good working 
majority. 

"A few days after, Mr. W. W. B. Mclnnes called at my office aud discussed 
the situation on the lines suu,ii'ested by his brother, Your Honor's private secre- 
tary, and confirmed the stuteiiicnts made by the latter. 

" Mr. W. W. B. McLnies subsequently had other interviews with me on the 
same subject in my office, and negotiations have practically continued until the 
present time. Your Honor will observe that such representations from such a 
quarter necessarily required serious consideration on the part of the Government 
and I was surprised to receive Your Honor's Utter, inasmuch as it placed an 
entirely new complexion on the whole situation." 

Mr. Turner then went into a constitutional and incidental defence of his 
position, claiming there was no ground for believing a majority of the members 
elected had intimated their intention of voting non-confldence in his government, 
and ended by claiming the right to await the verdict of the electors at the hands 
of their representatives in the Legislature assembled. He questioned the course 
the Lieutenant-Governor had chosen to adopt before the elections were conclu- 
ded, and for himself and his colleagues asked that the Lieutenant-Governor's 
letter of the 8th August should be reconsidered. 

The Lieutenant-Governor's replj' to this was a lengthy document, giving his 
reasons for his course, and for the objections he had raised to the things he had 
been advised to do. In the course of the document, after a reference to some ex- 
penditures he had sanctioned, but the legality of which he questioned, was the 
following :— 

" On a subsequent occasion I had a batch of warrants in connection with 
routine matters sent up for my approval, fastened together in the manner in 
which I had been instructed that my signature on the last sheet would cover the 
preceding sheet. There was a large numl)er of them fastened together in this 
way, but I inspected them all individually before signing the last sheet. To my 
surprise, I found inserted therein, in different places, six or seven warrants in 
blank. As I did not propose to approx^e of blank warrants, I cut them out. This 
was about the 19th July last. I have since waited for some information in 
regard to, or some enquiry for those warrants in blank, but none has been forth- 
coming." 

Complaint was also made by the Lieutenant-Governor that the Attorney- 
General (Mr. D. M. Eberts) had wrongly informed him on the law in connection 
with an expenditure of f 15,000 for services in the Cassiar district. The close of 
the letter was marked by some sharp personal reflections on Mr. Turner's 
course. 

Mr. Turner's retort was, in turn, marked by a sharpness of criticism not often 
found in letters to the head of a government. He laid down constitutional rules 
in support of his line of conduct and quoted precedents therefor. In regard to 
the blank warrants referred to in the Lieutenant-Governor's letter, he said :— 

" Possibly you have not made yourself acquainted with the manner of proce- 
dure with respect to wliat you term warrants; they are requisitions, and the sys- 
tem is such that if by chance, among a larire immber of sheets, a blank one got 
in, it could be of no use. and I should hardly tliink it possible that Your Honor 
would sign a blank sheet. 

" These reipiisit Ions before being passed by the executive are examined and 
cheeked otl by tiie Auditor-tJeneral and they are all numbered, and the amount 
where not finished on one sheet, cai'ried forward to the next and added up. It is 
this tinal sheet that should l)e signed by Your Honor, hut in addition all these 
blank retiuisitions are enclosed in a folder and on this a memorandum from the 



THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 



Minister of Finance with a list of all the requisitions that are enclosed with the 
number of each, also the number of the vote under which they are paid and the 
amount of each. 

'■ The memorandum is signed by the President of the Council and subse- 
quently by Your Honor and is the order-in council authorizing the amount as set 
forth on it to be paid. No other requisitions can be paid save such as appear in 
this order. 

" On the return of the parcel of requisitions and order signed by Your Honor 
it goes to the Auditor Cieneral. If any requisitions that complied with the order- 
in-council were short the Auditor-General would report, but seeing that they 
must correspond with the memorandum that accompanies them and none can be 
paid that do not appear on that memorandum ; further that a blank requisition 
would be useless. I fail to see the point of your Honor's remarks on this 
subject. 

" I content myself by saying that in no single instance was there even a 
thought of, let alone an attempt at such a course as Your Honor, without defin- 
itely alleging it, would fain induce the people to infer." 



In Quebec little of special interest occurred. The statement of revenue and 
expenditure for the year 1897-98, issued in August, showed the former to have 
been 84,112,547, and the latter §4,851,778. This meant a deficit of §289,2.31. There 
was also besides the above, an expenditure of §469,790 of capital (or borrowed 
money) made up of §237,471, repayment of railway interest guarantee deposits ; 
§.S3,67o, repayment of trust funds; §196,284, railway subsidies; $2,360, otiier pur- 
poses. The statement of the debt at 30th June, showed it to be made up as 
follows : — 

Bonds issued §:34,283,841 

Less sinking fund 10,004,677 

§24,279,163 
Temporary loans and deposits 1,166,706 

Total §25,445,870 

During the year some progress was made in the conversion of the debt, §738,- 
676 of 3 per cent inscribed stock having been issued to replace the higher interest 
bearing bonds of former loans. 



In Prince Edward Island, Mr. Warburton, the premier, resigned to take a 
judgeship, and was succeeded by Hon. Donald Farquharson, the other ministers 
retaining their positions. 



The revenue and expenditure of the provinces, aside from Quebec, whose 
figures are noted above, for 1897, are given as follows : — 

Revenue. Expenditure. 

Ontario §4,139,848 §3,767,676 

Nova Scotia 8;J2,240 Sihi,(WJ 

New Brunswick 745,203 727, 187 

Manitoba 683,706 780,109 

British Columbia. I,:i8;3,048 I,5(i9,071 

P. E. Island 272,550 310,752 



56 



THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 



These figures, from the Statistical Year Book, show an annual expenditure 
per head of population, of $1.68 in Ontario, $1.87 in Nova Scotia, $2.26 in New 
Brunswick, $3.80 in Manitoba, .f 10.41 in British Columbia, and B2.85 in Prince 
Edward Island. The rate in Quebec in the same year was $3.10. 

According to the above authority the debts of the provinces in the fiscal years 
ending during 1897 were a.s follows :— 



Quebec 

Nova Scotia 

New Brunswick. 

Manitoba 

British Columbia 
P. E. Island 



Gross Debt. 



$35,.553,867 
3,617,138 
3,0.53,9.57 

5,793,843 

6,586,004 

362,284 



Dominion 
Allowance. 



p2,.549,214 

1,056,197 

530,402 

3,707,196 

58:3,021 

182,176 



Other 

Assets. 



$11,286,177 

257,026 

.34,977 

4.391,941 

1,718,968 

11,844 



Net Debt. 



$21,718,476 
2,303,923 

2,488,578 



4,284,015 
168,264 



Ontario has obligations represented by annuities, payable during a period 
extending over 20 years, of •?1,986,292, against which there are claimed assets of 
$o,124,6()4. In each case the assets are exclusive of lands and buildings owned 
by the provinces. 



Fire 



Marine 



ROBERT HAMP80N I SON 



°.A? (o V o fo 0)2, <o oj o r o 



ONiJO OXSLS ONJO O 



INSURANCE 
BROKERS : : 



(50XS OdxS 'S^SS voo\3 



18 CORN EXCHANOE BLD'G 



MONTREAL 



THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 



THE PLEBISCITE. 

The following are the official returns of the plebiscite, taken on the 29th Sep- 
tember, on the question :— 

" Are j'ou in favor of the passing of an act prohibiting the importation, manu- 
facture or sale of spirits, wine, ale, beer, cider, and all other alcoholic lif|Uors for 
use as beverages ?" 

ONTARIO. 



Constituency. 



Total Vote. 



Majority. 



For I Against i For 



Against 



Addington 

Algoriia 

Bothwell 

Brant, South 

Brockville 

Bruce, North 

Bruce, East 

Bruce, West 

Cardwell 

Carleton 

Cornwall and Stormont 

Dundas 

Durham, East 

Durham, West 

Elgin, East 

El-in, West 

Essex, North 

Essex. South 

Frontenac 

Glengarry 

Grenville 

Grey East 

Grey North 

(M-ey South ... 

Haldiniand-Monck 

Halton 

Hamilton 

Hastings, East 

Hastings, North .. 

Hastings, West 

Hurtni, East 

Huron, South 

Huron, West 

Kent 

Kingston 

Lambton. East 

Ijanil)t()n, West 

Lanark, North 

Lanark, South 

Leeds-Grenville, North . 

Leeds, South 

Lennox 



1,848 


1,336 


512 


2,705 


1,458 


1,247 


1,906 


800 


1,106 


2,193 


l,5f53 


630 


1,.328 


7«!) 


5:39 


1,926 


M2 


1,284 


1,104 


1,421 




l,a32 


6:^ 


i,198 


1,158 


6:35 


52:3 


1,027 


599 


428 


1,808 


1,056 


752 


1,990 


612 


1,378 


1,368 


615 


753 


1,465 


557 


908 


2,212 


1,945 


267 


2,055 


1.415 


640 


a57 


3,276 
l,;i09 




1,664 


:i55 


764 


614 


150 


1,448 


1,082 


366 


1,034 


813 


221 


2,546 


684 


l,.^i2 


2,310 


1,147 


1,16:3 


1,8:^5 


1,188 


(>47 


1,616 


1,282 


:334 


1,894 


1,272 


622 


2,844 


4,376 




1,324 


1,0J)2 


2:32 


1,928 


738 


1,190 


1,260 


875 


as5 


1,860 


814 


1,046 


1,630 


849 


781 


1,958 


833 


1,125 


1,990 


1,915 


ID 


1,149 


l,5<il 




2,450 


874 


1.576 


1,657 


8(i7 


790 


i,;«i 


420 


911 


l,25;i 


673 


.580 


1,122 


:w7 


7:35 


2,222 


975 


1,247 


l,2()(i 


625 


641 



317 



2,419 



1,5:32 



412 



58 



THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 



O'STAmO.—Confinued. 



Constituency. 



Lincoln-Niagara 

London 

Middlesex, East 

Middlesex, North 

Middlesex, South 

Middlesex, West 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk, North 

Norfolk, South 

Northumberland, East 

North u 111 herland. West 

Ontario, North 

Ontario, South 

Ontario, West 

Ottawa City 

Oxford, North 

Oxford, South 

Peel 

Perth, North 

Perth, South 

Peterboro, East 

Peterboro, West 

Prescott 

Prince Edward 

Renfrew, North 

Renfrew, South 

Russell 

Simcoe, East 

Simcoe, Norrh 

Simcoe, South 

Toronto, Centre . . 

Toronto. East 

Toronto, West 

Victoria, North 

Victoria, South 

Waterloo, North 

Waterloo, South 

Weliand 

Wellington, Centre 

Wellington, North 

Wellington, South 

Wentworth, North, and Brant. 

Wentworth, South 

York, East 

York, North 

York, West 



Total . 



Total Vote. 



Majority. 



For 



198 
540 
362 
;fiO 
674 
6:« 
,166 
882 
,060 
,758 
,215 
,130 
,836 
,683 
,641 
,612 
,760 
,179 
,187 
,753 
,831 
,566 
,182 
821 
,909 
,424 
,195 
,64(5 
,500 
,115 
,744 
,116 
,715 
,314 
139 
,592 
982 
,72() 
,525 
,94(! 
,175 
,911 
,710 
222 
!2,^4 
630 
,592 



Against 



1.54,485 



2,368 

2,435 

1,440 

1,034 

978 

773 

1,033 

1,180 

746 

1,174 

534 

459 

1,014 

910 

803 

3,310 

1,415 

782 

1,098 

2,106 

803 

504 

605 

2,275 

.582 

1,330 

885 

2,221 

2,207 

1,152 

662 

1,798 

3,222 

5,375 

436 

945 

2,873 

1,795 

1,975 

932 

1,134 

1,447 

702 

l.:«:{ 

2,357 

1,015 

2,500 



For 



922 
526 
696 
866 
Ll.SJi 



L314 

584 
1,681 
671 
822 
773 
838 



345 
1,397 

89 

1,028' 

1,062 

oil 



1,327 

94 

310 

293 

96.{ 

1,082 



703 
647 



1,014 
1,0:^7 

464 
1,014 

889 



621 
92 



11.5,275 55,073 



Against 



175 



298 



698 



353 



1,454 



682 
1,.508 
2.061 



1,5W1 
449 



15,tK)7 



IHE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 



59 



QUEBEC. 



Constituency. 



Arpjenteuil 

Bat,'<)t 

Bt'iiuce 

Bi-aiiharnois 

Hellechasse 

Bertliier 

Boiiaventure 

Bronie 

Chanibly and Vercheres 

Chainplain 

Charlevoix 

Chat eauKuay 

Chicoutimi and Saguenay 

Coinptou 

Dorehesler 

Driiiinnond and Arthabaska 

Gaspn 

Hochelaga 

Huntington 

J.accjues Cartier 

Jolit'tte 

Karnouraska 

Label le 

Lapiairie and Xapierville 

L'Assoniption . 

Laval 

I^evis 

L'Lslet 

Lotbiniere 

Alaisonneuve 

Maskinonge 

Megantic 

Mi.ssis(|uoi 

Montcalm 

JNIont niagny 

Montmorency 

Montreal (St. Anne Division) . . . . 
Montreal (St. Antoine Division).. 

Montreal (St. James Division) 

Montreal (St. Lawrence Division) 

Montreal (St. Mary Division) 

Nicolet .' 

Pontiac 

Portneuf 

Quebec Centre 

Quebec East 

Qtiebec West 

Quebec County 

Richmond and Wolfe 

Biclu'lieu 

Rimouski 

Rouville 



Total Vote. 



For Against 



866 
126 
167 
426 

50 
107 
443 
,216 
285 
130 

59 
586 
129 
,616 

49 
548 
158 
,319 
,266 
418 
143 

56 
546 
188 

76 
171 
152 

38 

86 
609 
123 
711 
,006 
101 

34 

57 
,009 
,405 
439 
,065 
463 
1.53 
963 
124 
313 
271 
196 
141 
,277 
139 
146 
174 



392 
1,793 
3,595 
1,456 
2,328 
1,430 
1,175 

691 
2,468 
2.162 
1,737 

940 
3,175 
1,125 
2,216 
3,989 
1,341 
2,595 

221 
2,124 
2,133 
l,8.i0 
1,785 
1,774 
1,602 
1,823 
2,.572 
1,^31 
1 9s7 
4,.501 
1,487 
2,139 
1,103 
1,444 
1,359 
1,301 
1,315 
1,221 
3,031 
2,249 
2,(527 
2,()84 

930 
2,()40 
2,251 
3.(W9 

969 
l,9.-)4 
2,."i30 
1.507 
2.S31 
2,017 



^Ia.I()HITV, 



For Against 



474 



525 



491 



1,045 



184 



1,667 
3,428 
1,030 
2,278 
1,323 
732 

2,183 
2,032 
1,678 
3.54 
3,046 

2.167 
3,441 
l,l.s3 
1,267 

1.706 
l.OiMI 
1.794 
1,239 
1..186 
1,.52() 
l,(i52 
2,420 
1,393 
1.901 
3,8S)2 
1,364 
1,428 
97 
1,343 
1,325 
1,244 
246 



2,592 
1,184 
2,K>4 
2,531 

2.516 
1.9:iS 
3,3(58 
773 
1,813 
l,25:i 
1.368 
2.(585 
1,843 



60 



THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 



QJJEBEC. —Continued. 



Constituency, 


Total Vote. 


Majority. 




For 


Against 


For 


Agaiust 


St. Hvacinthe 


150 

290 

1,068 

663 

97 

1,773 

91 

212 

318 

91 

155 

1,187 

88 


2.354 
2,196 
1,801 

629 
1,085 

641 
2,369 
2,018 
1,350 
1,571 
1,016 
2,:«9 
1,606 




2,204 
1,906 


St. Johns and Iberville 




Shefford 




733 


Sherbrooke ' 

Soulanges : 


34 


988 


Staustead 


1,132 




Teniiscouata 


2,278 
1,806 
1,032 
1,480 


Terrebonne 




Three Rivers — St. Maurice 




Two Mountains 




Vaudreuil 




861 


Wright 




1,1.52 


Yaniaska 





1,518 






Total 


28,582 


122,614 


3,885 


97,974 







NOVA SCOTIA, 



Constituency, 



Annapolis 

Aiitigonish 

Cok-hester 

Cumberland 

Cape Breton 

Digby 

Giiysborough 

Halifax 

Hants 

Inverness 

Kings 

Lunenburg 

Pictou 

Kichniond. 

Shelburne and Queens 

Victoria 

Yarmouth. . 

Total 



Total Vote. 



For 



1,989 
527 
3,252 
4.444 
2,163 
1,150 
1,251 
3,190 
1,970 
1,211 
2,457 
1,568 
4.175 
349 
2,361 
746 
1,907 



34,792 



146 
480 
171 
306 
798 
812 
190 
670 
134 
797 

69 
286 
329 
313 

95 
186 
120 



5,402 



Majority. 



Against For 



1,843 
47 
3,081 
4,138 
1,365 
838 

i,otn 

2,520 

1,8;^; 

414 
2,388 
1,282 
3,846 
3(? 
2,2ti6 

560 
1,787 



29,308 



Against 



THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 



61 



NEW BRUNSWICK. 



Constituency. 


Total 


Vote. 


Majority. 




For 


Against 


For 


Against 


Albert 

(Jarleton 


1,147 
2,590 
2,160 

361 

524 
2,088 
1,619 

918 
1,8:32 
3,0:35 
3,686 

467 
3,330 
3,154 


285 
1(50 
193 
533 

1,094 
370 
827 
128 
2:38 

1,.5.50 

1,749 
.560 

1,517 
372 


862 
2,430 
1,967 




Charlotte 






172 






570 




1,788 
792 
790 
1,.594 
1,485 
1,937 




NorUimberland 

Restigouche 

Sunbiiry and Queens 

St. .John Gitv 

*St. .Tohn City and Coujity 


93 


Westmoreland 

York 


1,813 
2,782 








Total 


26,911 


9,556 


n7,240 


8:35 



*In the casi of St. John City and County and St. John City, each city voter 
had two votes, so that the city vote for and against is twice counted. 



PRINCE EDWARD ISLi.^XD. 



Constituency. 



K'ngs 

Prince, East. . 
I'rince, West. 
(^neen"s, East 
CJueen's West. 

Total 



Total Vote. 


Majority. 


For 


Against 


For 


Against 


1,909 
2,003 
1,;352 
2,051 
2,146 


29t) 
212 
197 
192 
246 


1,610 
1,791 
1,155 
1.859 
1,900 




9,461 


1,146 


8,315 









62 



THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 



MANITOBA. 



Constituency. 


Total Vote. 


Majority. 




For 1 Against 


For 


Against 


Bi'candon 


3,696 
2,289 
1,343 
2,365 
349 
926 
1,451 


507 
429 
138 

mi 

294 
355 
921 


3,189 

1,860 

1,205 

2,031 

55 

571 

530 




Lis^ai" 




Marquette 




Macdonald 




Provencher 




Selkirk 




Winuipeo; City 








Total 


12,419 


2,978 


9,441 









NORTHWEST TERRITORIES. 



Constituency. 


Total 


Vote. 


Majority. 




For 


Against 


For Against 


Alberta 


1,708 

1,204 

2,715 

611 


1,:«1 
461 
705 
327 


377 

743 

2,010 

284 




Assinaboia, West 




Assinaboia. East 




Saskatchewan , 








Total ' 


6,238 


2,824 


3,414 









BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Constituency. 



Burrard 

New Westminster. 

Vancouver 

Victoria 

Yale and Cariboo. . 



Total. 



Total 


Vote. 


Majority. 


For 


Against 


For 


Against 










1,211 
933 


448 

946 

1,307 

1,359 


763 


13 " 

3(59 


938 




1,512 


1.53 




0,000 


0,000 


otxi 


000 



THE PEOPLES ALMANAC 



63 



SUMMARY. 



Constituency. 


Total Vote. 


Majority. 




For 


Against 


For 


Against 


Ontario 


1.54,485 

25,582 

34,792 

2,694 

9,461 

12,419 

6,238 


115.275 
122,614 
5,402 
9,586 
1,146 
2,978 
2,824 


39,406 




Quebec . 


94,089 


Nova Scotia 


29,308 

14.405 

8,315 

9,441 

3,414 








Prince Edward Island 

Manitoba 

North West Territories 















On the Ist of January, 1894, at the time of the polling in the municipal elec- 
tions, a plebiscite was taken in Ontario on the desirability of prohibiting the 
importation, manufacture and sale as a beverage, of intoxicating liquors. The 

result was as follows : — 

Yes. No. 

Counties 145,.504 82,578 

Districts o,i:?6 2,951 

Cities 27,145 21,219 

Separate Towns 2,402 1,746 

180,187 108,494 

This showed a majority for prohibition, in the male vote of 71,693. There 
was also a female vote taken, which raised the total majority in favor of prohibi- 
tion to 81,769. 

In Prince Edward Island, on December 13, 1893, the date of the provincial 
elections, a plebiscite was taken on the question of p'-ohii)iting the importation, 
manufacture or sale of intoxicating liquor as a beverage in tlie province. The 
result was 10,.585 yes and 3,331 no votes, a majority for prohibition of 7,2.54. 

Nova Scotia and Manitoba also had provincial plebiscites on like questions 
The result was as follows : — 

Nova Scotia — 

For 43,756 

Against . . . 12,3.55 

Majority for 31,401 

Manitoba — 

For 1S,0.S7 

Against 7,115 

:\Iajority for 10,922 



64 



THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 



THE PUBLIC DEBT. 



The public debt of Canada at the end of the fiscal yaar 1897-98, (the 30th of 
June, 1898) according to the official statement in the Canada Gazette of Sept. 17, 
with comparison.s with the preceding year, was made up as follows : — 





1896-97. 


1897-98. 


Liabilities— 

Payable in England 


218,225,503 

4,866,666 

9,:345,913 

1,92:3,257 

22,318,096 

48,9:37,157 

8,472,519 

16,406,757 

1,892,959 


227,958,836 


do do Temporary Loans 


do Canada 


9,111,810 

1,927,206 
22,178,193 
5(», 113,941 

8,518,494 
16,406,44:3 

2,155,326 


Bank Circulation Redemption Fund 

Dominion Notes 

Savings Banks , 

Trust Funds 

Province Accounts • 


Miscellaneous and Banking Accounts 


Total Gross Debt 


:3;32,388,832 


338,:370,254 


Assets— 

Investment— Sinking Funds 

Other Investments 

Province Accounts 

Miscellaneous and Banking Accounts 


38,516,189 

6,261,527 

10,606,089 

15,71:3,248 


40,876,157 

6,371,527 

10,(50:3.219 

16,4:32,991 




71,097,055 


74,283,896 


Total Net Debt 


261,291,776 


264,086.357 






Increase of Debt in 1897-98 




2,794,580 









On the 30th June, 1896, two weeks before the present Government took office, 
the gross debt amounted to $325 717,537, and the net debt to S258, 497,433. 

In the first two years of a Liberal administration, therefore, the gross debt 
increased by $12,652,717, and the net debt by §5,588,924. 

The bonded debt, in the same time, was increased from §227,805,549 to 
$237,060,647. 

The Liberal party leaders, who thought the debt of Canada too large when 
the Conservatives controlled the Government, did not find it large enough when 
they succeeded to power. So they added some millions each year. 



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383 Wellington St., Ottawa. 



THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 



Go 



THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE. 



The revenue of Canada for the fiscal year 1897-98 reached the highest figure in 
the historj- of the country, viz., §40,275,704, made up of the following items :— 

Customs Taxes *21, 731 2:^8 

Excise " 7,871,562 

Post OflHce Receipts :i,528,8(Jii 

Public Works and 'Railway Receipts 3,872,478 

Miscellaneous Receipts 3,271,614 

340,275,704 
The first two items in the above table represent the amount collected by tax- 
ation, the others being payments for services rendered by the Government to 
those interested. 

The customs and excise taxes were the heaviest in five years, the comparison 
showing as follows : — 



1897-98 
1896-97 
1895-96 
1894-95 
1893-94 



Customs. 

$21,731,238 
19,478,247 
19,833,279 
17,040,466 
19,198,114 



Excise. 

R 871,562 
9,170,379 
7,926,006 
7,805,7:33 
8,381,089 



Total. 

829,602,801 
28,648,626 
27,7.59,2&5 
25,446.199 
27,579,203 



In customs and excise taxation, therefore, the Liberal Government has 
increased the amount collected — "wrung" its members used to call it — from the 
people of Canada, compared with the record of the last year of their Conservative 
predecessors, by $1,843,516. They have increased the sum of the taxation by over 
6 per cent. 



The figures of the expenditure show that this increase of taxation was neces- 
sary, to meet the heavier expenditure. The cost of the administration of the 
government in 1897-98 reached the highest figure but one in the history of the 
Dominion. It was only exceeded in the year 1885-86, wlien the second Riel rising 
on the Saskatchewan caused an extraordinary outlay on military account. For 
five years past the expenditure on Consolidated Fund account, that is for the 
ordinary expenses of the Government, has lieen as follows : 

1897-98 $38,699,823 

1896-97 :i8,349,760 

1895-96 :36,949,142 

1894-95 :i8,132,005 

1893-94 37,585,026 

In the last completed year of the Liberal Government, therefore, it took 
$1,750,681 more to meet its current expenses than in the last year of the late 
Conservative Government. 

In the budget debate of 1896, replying to Mr. Foster, Sir Richard Cartwright 
declared that an expenditure of .$38,000,000 a year for federal purposes was a 
disgrace and a shame, a thing utterly unjustifiable a monstrous thing! His 
words, applied now to the acts of the Government of which he is a member, are 
its condemnation. 3 



66 THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC. 



Besides the $38,699,823 expended on administrative services last year there 
was a further sum laid out for the following objects : 

Piiblic works, railways and canals . . .§3,841,722 

DtKnin ion lands 127,118 

Railway subsidies 1,414,934 

Militia 1.57,740 

Riel rebellion expenses 1,272 

5,-542,786 
The total expenditure of the fiscal year 1897-98 was, therefore, §44,240,117, or 
$3,964,413 more than the revenue, which was $40,275,704. 

The current year is not likely to show better results. The estimates of ex- 
penditure, submitted to and sanctioned by Parliament, authorize a total outlay 
of $47,970,948 in the twelve months ending June 30, 1899. 



THE PREFERENTIAL TRADE FAILURE. 



The failure of the preferential tariff to work as the Liberal Government 
announced that they expected it would, is another evidence of the ministerial 
failure to rightly judge of the efforts of the party policy. The preference in favor 
of goods from Great Britain, by which they were entered at one-eighth less duty 
than merchandise from other countries, went into operation on April 23, and v.as, 
therefore, the rule for over two months of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1897. 

In that year, compared with the preceding twelve months, the imports 
" entered for consumption" from Great Britain fell to $29,412,188, from §32,979,742, 
or by §3,567,554. 

In the same time the value of goods imported from the United States 
increased from $58,-574,024 to $61,649,041, or by §3,075,017. 

In the year ending June 30, 1898, the preference in favor of Great Britain 
was in force the whole twelve months. During that time, according to the 
figures supplied by the ministers to Liberal papers, the value of goods entered 
for consumption was $19,384,000 greater than in the year ending June 30, 1897. 
The share of the increase that fell to Great Britain, howevei*, was only §2,986,205. 
The share of the increase of the United States was §16,614,463. 

Taking three years' statistics, it is found that the value of goods imported 
and entered for consumption from these two countries has been as follows : 

FROM GREAT BRITAIN. FKOM UNITED STATES. 

1895-96 §32,979,742 §58,.574,024 

1896-97 29,412,188 61,649.041 

1897-98 32,398,393 78,263,5(U 

Comparing 1897-98 with 1895-96, the year before there was any preferential 
tariff, it is seen that the goods entered for consumption from Great Britain de- 
creased by $581,349, where those from the United States increased by §19,689,480. 

It was claimed when the Laurier-Fielding tariff was introduced that the 
general reduction of duties would be more advantageous to the United States 
than to British exporters to Canada. So far experience justifies the claim. 



THE PEOPLK'S ALMANAC 67 



NEW BRUNSWICK. 

In New Brunswick, the Coalition Government, (so called), came into power 
in 1883, with Hon. A. G. Blair at its head. The present premier is Hon. Mr. 
Ti^mmerson, a supporter and follower of Mr. Blair, and with the exception of two 
years or thereabouts these two gentlemen both Liberals— have dominated the 
government. 

The history of afVairs under their administration is instructive. 

For the fiscal year ending, Oct. I^lst, 1882, the receipts of the province were 
i564o,710 and the expenditure, $()14,2;«. 

For the fiscal year, 1897, the revenue was §745,202 and the expenditure, 
§837,186. 

It will be seen, therefore, that whilst the revenue has apparently increased 
15 p. c, the expenditure has increased 3(5 p. c. . , 

It should also be stated that the revenue for 1897 consists of additions to that 
of 1882 in taxes on Incorporated Companies, .§22,747; in Succession Duties, 
§9,294; in Liquor Licenses, .§20.2(i7, and for support of Lunatic Asylum, §45,117, 
or in all §97,425 of revenue from sources created since 1882. and .taken directly 
from municipalities or corporations or individuals. If this be deducted it shows 
absolutely no elasticity in revenue for the period. The increase in expenditure, 
however, is large and absolute. 



The net debt of the province, December 31st, 1884, was §757,(597. On the 31st 
December, 1897, it was $2,488,.577, i. e., the net debt has increased during the 
period named by §1,730,880 or 230 p. c. 

The bonded debt on 31st October, 18S2, was §850,800, and on 31st October, 1897 
was $2,885,50(^), an increase of §2,035,700 or 240 p. c. 

§100,000 of new bonds have been issued for the fiscal year 1898. 
The charge upon the revenue for interest was in 188:^, §46,(KX) or ,'4 of the re- 
venue. It is now nearly .§140,000 or about } of the total revenue of the province- 
As the debt is increasing l)y about §13'),000 j'early, it will be seen that the ab- 
sorption of revenue for fixed interest charges is growing at an alarming degree. 



It will be noted also that the administration has been especially burdensome 
to th e people in two wa ys : — I 

(1). In taking to itself fees and funds which had hitherto belonged to the 
municipalities, and had helped to lighten their burdens ; and 

(2). In throwing upon the municipalities charges which had hitherto been 
borne by the provincial exchequer. 

For example the Liquor liicense fees, which formerly belonged to the muni- 
cipalities, are now absorbed to the extent of one half their amount by the provin- 
cial administration, and the cost of the maintenance of the Lunatic Asylum, 
formerly all defrayed by the province, is now thrown in part upon the munici- 
palities. 



In the provincial bookkeeping there is no independent and ellicient audit, and 
the (Jovernment has so far allowed no free investigation of the public accounts in 
Comillittee. 



68 THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 

Last year was the first approach to anything like an even partial investigation 
into these accounts, and under great difficulties the committee unearthed a con- 
dition of things, as regards inordinate charges and unwarranted payments that 
provoked widespread suspicion and discontent. 

This feeling has been enhanced by recent revelations as to the expenditures 
upon public bridges, in which it appears, based upon actual measurements and 
weights, and the cost as published in the public reports and as admitted by Mr. 
Emmei'son, that the Government has, without asking for tenders, or without 
any form of public competition, been awarding contracts for the superstructures 
of iron bridges at prices from 100 to 1.50 p. c. greater than they could be obtained 
for by public tender, or than they are actually constructed for in the province of 
Nova Scotia, where the system of public competition and tender obtains. 

These charges, although they have been standing for months in the public 
press, have received no answer at the hands of the Government or their party 
supporters. 

The Government, although called by courtesy a coalition Government, has 
been under Mr. Blair and Mr. Emmerson, simply an instrument of the Dominion 
Liberal party.- Its former premier is now a member of the Federal Cabinet, and 
on the occasion of his contest in Sunbury-Queens in 1896, the full force of the Gov- 
ernment patronage and influence was thrown into the county in his behalf, and 
since his election Mr. Emmerson has simply registered the will of his former 
and present leader in federal politics. 

This unfair treatment of the Liberal-Conservative party, by a Government 
which ostensibly was constituted of both Liberal and Conservative elements, has 
tended to the dis-organization of the Liberal-Conservative party, and on July 
19th, 189S, the Liberal-Conservative Convention assembled at Moncton unanim- 
ously passed the following resolution : 

" We declare ourselves unwavering adherents of the underlying principles of 
the national policy as expounded in the enactments and administration of the 
late Liberal-Conservative Government under Sir .John A. Macdonald and his suc- 
cessors, the application of which has contributed so largely to the development 
of the industrial and national life of Canada, and we deplore any action by the 
present Government which would tend to impair and weaken its beneficial force. 

" We hail with delight the continuing indications of growing union between 
colonial and imperial interests, and affirm our belief that the truly imperial ideal 
can only be realized by a practical and mutual preference in the niarkets of each 
for the produce of the other, and above all foreign imports. 

" We heartily approve of the course pursued by the Liberal-Conservative Op- 
position in Parliament during the past three sessions under the experienced lea- 
dership of Sir Charles Tupper, and we pledge our most earnest efforts in support 
of the same ; and we endorse the course pursued by the able leader of the Conser- 
vative party in New Brunswick, the Hon. Geo. E. Foster, and also recognize the 
ability displayed by the other representatives of New Brunswick in the House of 
Commons. 

" We believe that the highest considerations of public morality and govern- 
ment demand that the promises made by political pai'ties seeking the suffrages 
of the people constitute the basis upon which the electorate makes its choice and 
bestows its confidence, and that they should therefore be kept scrupulously icvio- 



THE PEOPLES ALMANAC 69 

late, and we condemn the present Government and party in power for its open, 
persistent and complete repudiation of pre-election pledges in a manner hitherto 
unknown in Canada. 

" We condemn the policy of the present Dominion Government ; (a) in that 
in violation of thedistinct and positive promises made in the directionof reducing 
the then present expenditure and previ'nting the ^Towtli of the public debt, they 
have extravagantly increased the yearly expenditures and added to the burdens 
of the people ; (1)) in the introduction of the vicious and un-British spoils system 
into the civil service of Canada, With its unjust and arbitrary dismissals of effi- 
cient public servants ; its encouragement of the baneful and corrupt practice of 
place hunting, and its utter demoralization of anything like a stable and etlicient 
public service ; (c) in tlie virt>ial abolition of that old and salutary principle 
hitherto applied to the expenditures of public moneys in Canada, which demand 
open competition by tender and the award of contracts for pulalic wor'ks based 
thereupon, and which constitutes the only efficient safeguard to the honest and 
economic administration of public affairs. 

" That the deliVx-rate disregard of their solemn promises on the part of the 
Prime Minister of Canada and certain of his colleagues has a tendency to lower 
the tone of jjublic life by detracting from the sacredness that under British 
tradition should attach to the word of a minister of the crown. 

" That in the opinion of this convention it is desirable that at the approach- 
ing general election for the province of New Brunswick, we support candidates 
pledged to establish and maintain a provincial administration in sympathy with 
Liberal Conservative principles." 



This has since been endorsed by conventions held in most of the counties of 
New Brunswick, and a vigorous campaign of organization and education has 
been begun in the Province. 

The leader of the Opposition, Dr. A. A. Stockton, has been joined by .J. D. 
Hazen, ex-M.P. for St. John, N.B., and they, with the other Liberal-Conservative 
leaders of the province, may be relied upon to prosecute a vigorous and successful 
campaign in the intfcrests of pure and economical government in New Brunswick. 

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LEADING EVENTS OF 1898. 



Jan. 1— Steamship Gerona lost off Seal 
Island, X.S. 
First autonomous government in 
Cuba formed. 

Jan. 3— Floor of London, Ont., City 
Hall falls ; 25 persons fatally in- 
jured . 

Jan. 4— Mrs. Alfred Tanguay killed at 
Sherbrooke,by Gedooii Dubois, who 
commits .suicide. 

Jan. .5— Fire in Ottawa College does 
.$40,000 damage. 

Jan. 7 — Theodore Uurrant hanged at 
San Francisco for murder of Blanche 
Lamont in 1S93. 

.Jan. 8 — First Canadian branch of the 
S. P. C. K. formed at Knowlton. 

.Jan. 10— Papal encyclical on Manitoba 
schools, says Laurier - Green way 
settlement is not sufficient. 
Quebec Legislative Council, by 18 to 
I), defeats Government's bill to put 
control of education in charge of a 
member of the Cabinet. 

Jan. 14— Mr. F. Langelier, M.P., named 
judge of Superior Court. 

Jan. 1.5— Quebec Legislature prorogued. 

Jan. 17 — Ontario Legislature prorogued 
and dissolved. 

Jan. 20— Lord Wolseley, at London, 
says if Great Britain declared war 
two of the finest and best equipped 
army corps would be ready before 
ships could Vie prepared to carry 
them. 

.Tan. 24 — Quebec Centre parliamentary 
election — Albert Malouin (Lib.) by 
acclamation. 

(u'.neral Booth, S.A., visits Mont- 
real. 

Jan. 27— Nova Scotia Legislature opens 
— F. A. Lawrence elected speaker, 
House of Assembly. 

Jan. 20 St. Jean Baptiste Church, 
Montreal, burned. 
G. T. R. C. P. R. North Bay traffic 
arrangement ceased ; new arrange- 
ment announced Nov. 28. 

Jan. 81— New British cable to Jamaica 
opened. 

Feb. 1 — Judge L. A. Jette sworn in as 
Lieutenant-Governor of Quebec. 

Feb. 2— Cordeliii Viavi found guilty at 
Ste. Scholasti(iue of the murder of 
her iiusband Poirier ; a})j)eal taken 
on question of admissability of her 
confession as proper evidence, 
which results in new trial being 
ordered. 



Feb. 3— Parliament meets. 

Feb. 4—" Tom " Nulty, at Joliette, sen- 
tenced to be hanged on May 20 for 
murder of his three sisters and 
brother ; sentence executed. 

Feb. 8— President Barrio.s, of Guate- 
mala, n^ui'dered. 

Feb. 10— British Columbia Legislature 
opened in new Ijuildings. 

Feb. 1.5— U. S. battleship Maine blown 
up in Havana harbor and 2()0 men 
lost, leading to war with Spain. 
See article. 

Feb. 10- French steamer Flachet, lost 
ott" Teneriffe ; 85 persons perish. 
Supreme Court in case of Perrault vs. 
Gauthier, upholds the legal right of 
trades unions to work to pre\ent 
the employment of non-union men. 

Feb. 22— Snowslide at Point Levis kills 
4 persons. 

Feb. 28— Emile Zola found guilty of 
slandering the Council of War of 
France, and sentenced to one year's 
imprisonment and to nay a fine of 
8,000 francs. .Judgment set aside 
on appeal. 

March 1— Ontario elections ; result 1 
Patron, 48 Conservatives, 50 Lib- 
erals ; vote estimated at 215,644 
Liberal. 208,48(i Conservative and 
and 0,005 independent. 

March 2— Senor Camposalles elected 
president of Brazil. 

March 4— Cliief Justice Burton of On- 
tario knighted. 
Canadian Mining Institute formed at 
Montreal ; John R. Hardman, pre- 
sident. 

March 10— Manitoba Legislature meets. 

March 11 — Protective tarilV adopted by 
Newfoundland Legislature. 

March 21— Crew of Newfoundland 
sealer Greenland caught in storm 
on ice tloe ; 48 perish. 

March 22 — Baniue Santa Rosa, for the 
Yukon, lost ; 40 perish. 

March 24 San .lose Scale Act ajiplied 
to trees and shrubs from A\istralia, 
Jai>an, Hawaii, and the United 
States, forbidding importations 
from these countries. 

March 2) Anglo-Egyptian troops cap- 
ture .Shendy. 

March 28 Russian Hag hoisted at Port 
Arthur and Tailenwan, China. 



#1% % 

THE ROYAL MILITARY COLLEGE. 



There are few national institutions of more value and interest to the 
country than the Royal Military College at Kingston. At the same time its 
object and the work it is accomplishing are not sufficiently understood by the 
general public. 

The College is a Government institution, designed primarily for the purpose 
of giving the highest technical instructions in all branches of military science 
to cadets and officers of Canadian Militia. In fact it is intended to take the 
place in Canada of the English Woolwich and Sandhurst and the American 
West Point. 

The Commandant and military instructors are all officers on the active lis*- 
of the Imperial army, lent for the purpose, and in addition there is a complete 
staff of professors for the civil subjects wliich form such a large proportion of 
the College course. 

Whilst the College is organized on a strictly military basis the cadets 
receive in addition to theirmilitary studies a thoroughly practical, scientific and 
sound training in all subjects that are essential to a high and general modern 
education. 

The course in mathematics is very complete and a thorough grounding is 
given in the subjects of Civil Engineering, Civil and Hydrographic Surveying, 
Physics, Chemistry, French and English. 

The object of the College course is thus to give the cadets a training which 
shall thoroughly equip them for either a military or civil career. 

The strict discipline maintained at the College is one of the most valuable 
features of the system. As a result of it young men acquire habits of obedience 
and self-control and consequently of self-reliance and command, as well as 
experience in controlling and handling their fellows. 

In addition the constant practice of gymnastics, drills and outdoor exer- 
cises of all kinds, ensures good health and fine physical condition. 

An experienced medical officer is in attendance at the College daily. 

Five commissions in the Imperial regular army are annually awarded as 
prizes to the cadets. 

The length of course is three years, in three terms of 9i months' residence 
each. 

The total cost of tlie three years' course, including board, uniforms, instruc- 
tional material, and all extras, is from 5^750 to $800. 

The annual competitive examination for admission to the College will take 
place at the headquarters of the several military districts in which candidates 
reside, about the middle of June in each year. 

For full particulars of this examination or for any other information 
application should be made as soon as possible to the Deputv-Adjutant General 
of Militia, Ottawa, Out. 



THE PEOPLES ALMANAC 



T.i 



March 30— Senate, by vote of 52 to 14, 
adopts six months' hoist of Mac- 
kenzie and Mann Yukon Railway 
Contract Bill. 

Marcli 31— Earthquake in the Ottawa 
valley. 

April 1— Joseph Lauctot, St. Henri, 
called to Legislative Council, Que- 
bec. 

April 5— Mr. Fielding makes his second 
budget speech. 

April 8— Anglo-British troops storm 
Dervish entrenchment at Atbara ; 
Captain Unjuhart and Lieut. Fin- 
lay of the (rordon Plighlanders, and 
Lieut. Gore of the Seaforth High- 
landers, and 2'2 men of the British 
troops, and 57 of the Egyptian 
troops killed. 
Snowslide in Cliilkoot Pass, Alaska, 
overwhelms 60 people. 

April 13— Prince, P.E.I., parliamentary 
election; B. D. McLennan (Lib.) 
elected over E. Hackett (Con.). 

April 20— John Sherman resigns; Judge 
Day appointed secretary of state in 
U. S. Cabinet. 

May 6— Yukon military contingent, 
under Lieut. -Col. Evans, leaves Ot- 
tawa for Dawson City. 

May 7— Mrs. Sternaman, on second . 
trial at Cayuga, found not guilty of 
niurdering her husband. 

May 8 — Archbishop Bruchesi appeals 
'to diocese for .§200,000 for Montreal 
R. C. cathedral. 

May 21— Schooner Jane Grey, for Klon- 
dike, lost ; 34 perish. 

May 22— French elections concluded ; 
Cluunbei' of Deputies ; Republicans 
254 ; Radicals 104 ; Radical Social- 
ists 74 ; Socialists 57 ; Rallies 37 ; 
Reactionaries 44 ; free lances 10. 

May 24-BriLisli Hag hoisted and Wei- 
Hai-Wei, China, occupied. 
K.C.M.G. conferred on Mr. J. D. 
Edgar, M.P., and C. A. P. Pelle- 
tier, senator (speakers) and J. G. 
Bourinot, clerk of House of Com- 
mons. 

May 30— M. C Cameron, M.P., ap- 
pointed Lieutenant-Governor of the 
Northwest Territories. 

June 1— Clarke Wallace, MP., re- 
elected grand master Orange order 
in B. N. A. 

June 2— Rev. Thomas Griffiths elected 
president Montreal Methodist Con 
fere nee. 

June 3— Australian federal constitution 
carried in Tasmania, Victoria and 
South Australia, l)ut fails in New 
South Wales, not receiving large 
enougli proportion of votes . 



Rev. Dr. Torrance, of Guelph, elected 
Moderator of the I'resbyterian 
Church in Canada, at Montreal. 

Ernest Terah Hooley, London com- 
pany promoter, goes into bank- 
ruptcy, and later makes statement'* 
reflecting on titlerl persons whom 
he paid to aid in his schemes. 
June ()— Rioting at Belfast in connec- 
tion with "98 centennial celebra- 
tion. 

June 9— Intense heat causes sufTering 
at Montreal and throughout east- 
ern North America 

June 12— Julio A. Roca elected presi 
dent of Argentine Republic. 

June 13 — Parliament prorogued— Sen- 
ate rejects a bill to give S30(»,000 of 
Manitoba school land fund to pro- 
vincial government. 
Joseph Leiters wheat operations at 
Chicago collapse, after sending 
wheat up to $1.>1 a bushel ; Let- 
ter's losses estimated at 87,000,000. 
Anglo-French agreement in regard 
to the Niger country signed. 

June 14 — Meline cabinet in France re- 
signs ; Brisson forms new one. 

June 16— Behring Sea seal seizures 
award of .'i?47«,0()0 paid by United 
States to Canada. 
German Reichstag elections show 
large Socialist gains. 

June 21— Accident at launch of battle- 
ship Albion in London ; 37 specta- 
tors drowned . 
James Lister, M.P., appointed Judge 
of Ontario High Court. 

June 24— Cai)tain Sverdrui) sails from 
Christiana in steamer Frain for the 
Arctic. 

June 26 — Marquis Ito resigns premier- 
ship of Japan ; Okuma Stagaki suc- 
ceeds him. 
Wellman Arctic expedition sails from 
Tromsoe. 

June 29— General Pellou.x form.s new 
Italian cabinet ; Di Rudini re- 
signed. 

June 30— Major-General Gascoigne re- 
tires from command of Canadian 
militia; Colonel Hutton succeeds 
him. 

July 2— Stereotypers' strike at Chicago 
causes all English daily papers to 
suspend for four davs. 

July 4 — P'rcncii steaTiiship La Bour- 
gogne, oil" Sable Island, collides 
with British ship Cronsartyshire, 
and sinks ; 5<>(t persons drowneil. 
Royal Scots Battalion, of Montreal, 
visits Portland, Maine. 



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TELEPHONE, MAIN 118. 



THE PEOPLES ALMANAC 



July o— British House of Commons, by 
286 to 144, rejects John Redmond's 
motion for redress of Ireland's tax- 
ation grievances. 

July 6— U. S. Senate votes to annex 
Hawaii and completes legislative 
action to that end. 

July 7— P. A. Choquette, M.P., ap 
pointed Judge Superior Court, 
Quebec. 

July 8 -House of Lords, by 129 to 46, 
passes second reading of Lord 
Strathcona's bill to legalize in 
United Kingdom marriages with 
deceased wife's sister contracted 
in the colonies ; bill fails to pass 
House of Commons. 

July 9- British Columbia elections ; 
result very close, and followed 
(Aug. 8) by dismissal of Turner 
Government and formation of new 
cabinet with Mr. Semlin as pre- 
mier. 

July 12— Imperial Postal Conference 
adopts sclieme of penny postage 
between the United Kingdom and 
colonies of Canada, Newfound- 
land, Cape Colony and Xatal ; 
goes into force on Christmas. 

July 18— MM. Zola and Perreux, on a 
second trial for libel, growing out 
of the Dreyfus case, convicted and 
sentenced to a year's imprison- 
ment and to paj' a fine of 3,000 
francs each ; Zola leaves France. 

July 20— Hot wave causes much dis- 
tress throughout eastern North 
America. 

July 23 — General arbitration treaty be- 
tween Italy and the Argentine Re- 
public signed. 

July 25— Town of Pugwash, N.S., 
nearh' destroyed by fire. 

July 28— Military commission to study 
Canada's defences begins— Colonel 
Lake, Colonel Leach, Colonel Dalton 
and Caiitain White, R.N. 
Fire at Roberval burns out thirty 
families. 

July 29— Irish Local Government Bill 
passed by House of Lords ; becomes 
law. 

July 30— Pope Leo XIII issues an en- 
cj^clical urging the people of Scot- 
land to return to the Roman 
Catholic faith. 

Avig. 1— New preferential clause of 
tarilVgoes into force. 

Aug. 3— Ontario Legislature meets to 
pa.ss bill dealing with right of paid 
election constables to vote ; first 
division (Aug. 13) shows 6 majority 
for Hardy government. 



Mr. George N. Curzon appointed 
\'iceroy of India and created Lord 
Curzon of Kerlleston. 

Aug. 10— Hon. D. Fan|uharson forms 
new P. E. I. cabinet : Mr. Warbur- 
ton named a. judge. 

Aug. 13— H. M. S. Mohawk reports an- 
nexing Santa Cruz and Duff Islands 
in the Pacific. 

Aug. lo. — Centennial of '98 rising cele- 
brated in Dublin and at other Irish 
points. 

Aug. 18— Yacht Dominion wins 4th 
race in series for the Seawanhaka 
Cup from the Challenger of N. Y. 
Seawanhaka-Corinthian Club, mak- 
ing :iout of 5 races, and gaining the 
trophy. Race was on Lake St. 
Louis. 

Aug. 19 -Centennial of settlement of 
Eastern Townships of Quebec cele- 
brated at Bolton. 

Aug. 23— British and United States 
Commission assembles at Quebec 
to adjust matters in dispute be- 
tween Canada and the United 
States : adjourns Oct. 8 to meet at 
Washington Nov. 10. 
Judge McColl named chief justice of 
British Columbia. 

Aug. 24— Great heat in Paris causes 
many deaths. 

Aug. 27— Representatives of Salvador, 
Honduras and Nicaragua sisn con- 
stitution of new Central American 
federation. 
Czar of Russia invites a European 
International convention to secure 
general disarmament. 
Vicar-General Gauthier, of Brock- 
ville. announced as new arch- 
bishop of Kingston. 

Aug. 30.— Lieut. -Col. Henrj-, at Paris, 
commits suicide after confessing to 
forgery of documents bearing on 
the Dreyfus case. General de Bois- 
deffre, chief of General Staff, re- 
signs ; Col. Paty du Clam, one of 
the witnesses, arrested : this is fol- 
lowed by the resignation of M. 
Cavaignac. Minister of War. of 
Gen. Zurlinden, who succeeded 
him, and M. Tillaye, Minister of 
Public Works ; Gen. Chanoine be- 
comes Minister of War. and ques- 
tion of revision of Dreyfus sentence 
is referred to judges. 

Aug. 31. — (Jreat South Wales coal 
strike ended liy mutualconcessions, 
after lasting manv months and in- 
volvinc .tO.(KK) meii. 

Sept. 1.- Lieut. Col. H. E. McCallum. 
C. M. G., named Governor of New- 



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THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 



fouiulland, in place of Sir Herbert 
Muiray, who resi,i:;iH'(l on account 
of ditlerence of opinion with cab- 
inet on the question of the Reid 
contract for operating the railwaj' 
and otlier pul)lic works. 

Sept. '1. Anglo-Egyptian army defeats 
Khalifa's forces and captures Oni- 
dunnan and Kliartouni ; some 10,CH)0 
Dervi.slies and 20U British killed. 
Gen. Kitchener proceeds to 
Fashoda, on Bahr-el-Ghazcl branch 
of the Nile, where he linds Major 
Marcliand at the head of a French 
expedition of 5 white men and some 
native followers, who had made 
their way from the Atlantic coast. 
Kitcliener hoists Egyjitian tiag, and 
treats Marchand as a scientific ex- 
plorer. Affair leads to much diplo- 
matic correspondence, Great 
Britain claiming to hold territory 
by virtue of its re-conquest from 
the Khalifa, whose predecessor had 
taken it from Egypt, which country 
had never abandoned its claim. 
France asserts first possession of 
non-occupied territory, but later 
agrees to withdraw, after Great 
Britain had made extensive war- 
like preparations. Gen. Kitchener 
created Baron Kitchener of Khar- 
toum. 

Sept. 3— Arrangement between Great 
Britain and Germany in regard to 
Africa announced. 

Sept. 5— Princess Wilhelmina crowned 
as Queen of Holland. 

Sept. G— Outbreak of Mohamedans at 
Candiain Crete, leads to bombard- 
ment of town by British warships 
and to demand by the powers for 
withdrawal of Turkish troops from 
the island, which the Sultan finally 
accedes to. 

Sept. 7— C'ape Colony elections result 
in a very close contest between 
Progressives and Afrikander Bond 
candidates, House of Assembly 
l)fing almost evenly divided. 
Sprigg Cabinet, after defeat, resigns 
Octol)er 12. Mr. W. P. Schreiner 
forms new government. 

Sep. 7— Li Hung Chang dismissed from 
office in China, presumalily because 
of Great Britain's comjjlaint of his 
undvie favoritism for Russia; this 
is followed by proclamation of re- 
forms bj' the Emperor, who is later 
set aside by the Dowager Empress, 
who assumes control of Chinese 
government and restores pro- 
Russian policy. 



Sept. 8 — Manuel Estrada Cabrera elect- 
ed president of Guafrmala. 

Sept. y— Federal Steel Company form- 
ed under laws of New Jersey to 
control steel output of the United 
States; capital .S200.(H)0.(K)0. 

Sept. 10 -Empress of Austria assassin- 
ated at Genoa by Lucheni, an 
Italian anarchist, Vvho is later sen- 
tenced to imprisonment for life. 

Sept. 11 — Business j)art of New West- 
minster, B. C, burned ; loss put at 

.^2,r)tH»,oo(). 

Hurricane in West Indies does much 
damage at Barbados, rendering 
5(),U00 people homeless and killing 
50(1. 

Sept. 14-Church of England Synod of 
province of Canada meets at 
Montreal. 

Sept. 15— Balloon sent up from Crystal 
Palace, London, attains the height 
of 27,500 feet. 

Sept. 18— Corner Stone of Montreal 
Catholic High School laid by Arch- 
bishop Bruchesi. 
Hail storm does much damage in 
Montreal and vicinity. 

Sept. 21— Mgr. Lorraine installed as 
first Bishop of Pi'inl)roke, Out. 
Monument to Sanmel de Champlain, 
unveiled at tjuebec. 

Sept. 22— Imperial edict announces ah- 
dication of the Emperor of China in 
favor of Uowager Empress. 

Sept. 2()— Cyclone in Niagara district 
destroys property and kills 5 people. 
Columbus's body exhumed at Havana, 
to be sent back to Spain. 

Sept. 29— Plebiscite vote on prohibition. 
See result elsewhere. 

Sept. 30— Col. John Hay sworn in as 
U. S. Secretary of State. 
H. M. S. Talbot. Indefatigable and 
Pallas visit Montreal. 

Oct. 1— Lord llerschell, ex-Lord Chan- 
cellor of England, banqueted by 
Montreal Bar. 

Oct. 3 — Ancient and Honorable Artil- 
lery Company of Boston, visits 
Quebec. 

Oct. 5— Fight with Indians at Bear 
Island. Minn.; Major Wilkinson 
and (i U. S. army men killed. 
Robl)ery of .Molson's Bank at Winni- 
peg rei)orted ; s;ti2,(»(l(l taken. 
S. S. Ganges, Montreal to Great 
Britain, lost ofl' Ferrol Point, 
Straits of Belle Isle. 

Oct. 10 -Strike of workmen at Paris 
creates feeling of alarm ; and 
causes military precautions to be 
taken. 



THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 



7!* 



Oct. 12— Ontario Legislature prorogued 
Oct. 14— Steamer Mohegan, goes ashore 

near the Lizard, on English Coast; 

IK) jiersons perisli. 

Oct. liS— Seven Mussulmans, convicted 
of nmrder of British soldiers, 
hanged at Candia, Crete ; five more 
hanged Oetol)er 2i). 

Oct. 21— \e\v Zealand House of Repre- 
sentatives adopts bill providing for 
old age pensions. 

Oct. 2i V. S. Supreme Court holds 
trunk line railways .Joint Trattic 
Association to be' illegal combin- 
ation to prevent competition. 

Oct. 25— Brisson Cabinet defeated in 
French Chamber of Deputies on a 
vote of conlidence ; M. Dupuy 
forms a new government. 

Oct. 27— East Willington, (Ont.) bye- 
election ; Hon. .J. M. Gibson (Lib.) 
elected over Dr. Coughlin, (Con.) 

Oct. 29— Court of Cassation at Paris 
orders a revision of Dreyfus Court- 
Martial trial, and institutes a sup- 
plementary enquiry into circum- 
stances connected with it. 

Nov. 1— South Ontario (Legislature) 
bye-election— Hon. John Dryden 
(Lib.) elected by 1.51 majority over 
Charles Calder, (Con.) 
United States of Central America 
formed by union of Nicaragua, Sal- 
vador and Honduras ; union dis- 
solved a month later. 
Steamer Cretan burned off Cape 
Charles, U. S. ; 5 persons perish. 

Nov. 2— Hon, Mr. Schreiner, in Cape 
Colony Parliament introduces bill 
to give an annual grant of £30, OUO 
to the British Navy. 

Nov. ^.—Emperor William and German 
Emi)ress visit .Jerusalem. 

Nov 4— Lord Salisbury at a banquet to 
General Kitchener at London, an- 
nounces that the French Govern- 
ment has agreed to withdraw its 
representatives from Fashoda. 
Northwest Legislative Assembly 
elections ; majority favorable to 
Haultain Ministry returned. 

Nov. 5.- Captured Spanish cruiser 

Maria Teresa abandoned by U. S. 

crew, and lost on Cat Island, 

Bahamas. 

Roof of Wonderland Theatre, Detroit, 

falls in; 1,5 killed. 
Sir^ Herbert Murray, Governor of 
Newfoundland, calls for resignation 
of Mr. Morine, Minister of Finance, 
on ground that he is legal adviser 
to Mr. Reid, contractor with the 
Government. 



Nov 6.-SS. Westmeath, Captain 
.Johnston, Hamburg to Montreal, 
abandoned ; ship and cargo valued 
at ^1,{HH),(HK). 

Nov. 7.— Marquis Yamagata forms 
Japanese Cabinet, in succe.ssion to 
Stagaki, resigned. 

Nov. 8. — U. S. State and Congressional 
elections ; Republicans lose some 
seats, but retain control of Congress. 

Nov 10.— Record newspaper office at 
\V Umington, N.C., wrecked and 8 
negroes killed in riot growing out 
of anger at Record's reflections 
on white women. 

Nov. 12.— Earl of Minto arrives at Que- 
bec and is sworn in as Governor- 
General. 

Nov 1.5.— Ten men killed in collision on 
Grand Trunk at Murray Hill, Ont. 
Turkish troops evacuate Crete ; 
Prince George of Greece appointed 
high commissioner of the island by 
the Powers. 
John Yeo, M.P., P.E.I., called to 
Senate. 

Nov. 18.— Lennox Legislature election, 
B. E. Aylesworth (Lib.) elected over 
Dr. Meacham (Con.) 

Nov. 22.— Corbett-Sharkey prize tight 
at New York awarded to Sharkey 
on a technical foul. 

Nov. 23— Baldwin Hotel, San Francisco, 
burned ; five people killed ; loss put 
at .^l,.50n.OOO. 

Nov. 24— Mr. Chamberlain, Colonial 
Secretary, advises Newfoundland 
Government of Imperial intention 
to settle the French Shore diHiculty. 

Nov. 2.5— Judge Osier, in dismissing 
North Essex election petition, con- 
demns the practise of "Sawing 
Oft" and abuses connected there- 
with. 

Nov. 27— Great snowstorm causes a 
blockade of traflic at New York 
and Boston. 
Steamship " Portland," from Boston 
to Portland, lost oil" Highland 
Light, Mass. ; all on board perish, 
about 100 in number. 

Dec. 2— Steamship Clan Drummond, 
from Glasgow to the Cape, lost in 
Bay of Biscay ; 27 perish. 
Emperor Francis Joseph of Austria 
celebrates the julilee of his suc- 
cession to the throne. 

Dec. 3— Jury in Napanee bank robbery 
case disagree as to guilt of ex clerk 
Ponton, but find Mackie guilty. 

Dec. S— Ontario bye-elections— (Jarrow 
(Lib.) elected over Beck (Con.) in 
West Huron ; Barber (Lib.) over 
Kerns (Con.) in Halton. 



80 



THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 



Dec. 13— Announcement of $1,000,000 
endowment for Roj'al Victoria 
College for Women in connection 
with McGill, by Lord Stratlicona, 
and of endowment of chair of 
history for McGill by Mr. W. C. 
McDonald. 
Sir William Vernon Harcourt an- 
nounces resignation of leadership 
of Liberal Party in Great Britain. 

Dec. 13— Tank of Consolidated Gas 
Company, New York, collapses, 
killing several people by flood of 
water let loose. 

Dec. 14— Parliamentary bye-elections — 
Marcil (Lib.) elected in Bagot over 
Brodeur(Con.); L. McCarthy (Ind.) 
in North Simcoe over Martin 
(Lib.); Johnston (Lib.) in West 
Lambton over Farrel (Con.); Bell 
(Lib.) in East Prince over Lefurgey 
(Con.); Martineau (Lib.) in Mont- 
magny over Blouin (Lib.). 



Ontario bye-election in East 
Northumberland — Douglas (Lib.) 
elected over Willoughby (Con.). 

Dec. 16— Cordelia Viau found guilty, 
on secoud trial, of murder of her 
husband, Isidore Poirier; sentenced 
to be hanged on March 10. 

Dec. 18— S.S. " Gaspesia," first vessel 
of line from Mil ford Haven, arrives 
at New Carlisle. 

Dec. 19— Quetjec bj'eelection— Plante 
(Con.) elected in Beauharnois over 
Mercier (Lib.); Cotton (Lib.) in 
Missi.squoi over Comeau (Con.); 
C. Langelier (Lib.) in Levis over 
Boutin Bourassa (Lib.) and Gelley 
(Con.); Blanchard (Lib.) in Ver- 
cheres over Archambault (Con.). 

Dec. 20— Macdonald Chemistry and 
Mining Building of McGill Univer- 
sity opened by Lord Minto ; Mr. 
W. C. Macdonald, the founder, 
created a K.C.M.G. 



MONTREAL DAIRY AND LIVE STOCK EXPORTS. 

The exports of dairy produce, cattle and sheep, from Montreal during the 
season of navigation, have been as follows : — 





Cheese. 
Boxes. 


Butter, 
Pkgs. 


Cattle. 


Sheep. 


1898 


1,888,785 
2,102,985 
1,726,226 
1,716,007 
1,726,058 
1,682,946 
1,608,353 
1,352,670 
1,486,220 
1,157,854 

i,i:m,349 

1,104,065 

891,065 

1,076,601 


278,922 

225,268 

157,321 

69,664 

32,137 

76,914 

103,139 

81,801 

30,142 

41,957 

16,528 

60,353 

54,263 

66,545 


99,049 

119,188 

100,360 

96,582 

87,604 

83,322 

93,731 

109,150 

123,136 

85,670 

60,504 

64,(i31 

63,932 

61,947 


34,991 


1897 


61,254 


1896 


80.671 


1895 


217,399 


1894 


136,763 


1893 

1892 

1891 


3,743 
15,932 
32,042 


1890 

1889 


4:3,372 
59,a34 


1888 


45,528 


1887 


36,027 


1886 


93,850 


1885 


39,401 



EVERYTHING IN THE STATIONERY LINE. 

MORTON, PHILLIPS & CO. 

BLKNK BOOK MHKERS KND PRINTERS. 
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THE PEOPLES ALMANAC 81 



THE WAR RECORD. 

In February. 1895, it was announced that a rebellion had again broken out in 
Cuba. The revolutionists were accorded much sympathy in the United States, 
and many expeditions were fitted out for the purpose of supplying them with 
arms and other necessaries for their military operations. This wa.s made a cause 
of complaint by Spain, and the United States Government assigned a number of 
naval vessels to the duty of preventing the filibusters from carrying out their 
plans. This duty was not generally approved of by U.S. opinion, and the neces- 
sity and cost it involved was in time made the cause by the U.S. Government for 
asserting a right to interfere in Cuba to put an end to a state of affairs that was 
injuring U.S. trade and offending the humane feelings of the U.S. people. Ten- 
sion was created, with ill-feeling on both sides. One step taken by the Washing- 
ton authorities was the ordering of the battleship " Maine." Captain Sigsbee, to 
Havana harbor, followed by the despatch of the Spanish cruiser "Viscaya"to 
New York. Then a private letter written by Senor Dupuy de Lome, Spani.sh 
minister at Washington, in which he reflected on President McKinley's course, 
was stolen by sympathizers of the Cuban rebels or their agents, and published, 
with the result that Senor de Lome resigned. Senor Polo y Bernabe, his suc- 
cessor, on his arrival at Washington, found the state of feeling so serious that he 
considered armed interference by the United States in Cuba almost inevitable. 
Any hopes of peace were shattered when, on the night of February 1.5th, the U.S. 
battleship "Maine" was blown up in Havana harbor, and some 2()0 of the crew were 
killed or drowned. The excitement in the United States became intense. A naval 
commission was appointed to go to Havana to enquire into the cause of the mis- 
hap, the request of the Spanish authorities to share in the investigation being 
rejected. I he report of the U.S. oflicers was to the effect that the explosion was 
due to outside causes. A Spanish commission, on the other side, held that the 
explosion was internal. The one report implied a crime committed against the 
ship of a nominally friendly power in a harbor under Spanish jurisdiction ; the 
other that carelessness on the ship or defective ammunition was behind the dis- 
aster. Expert opinion divided ; but in the United States the outside explosion 
idea agreed with the feelings that had been aroused, and war, which had been 
looked for from the date of the explosion, was regarded as inevitable. Congress, 
in anticipation of what would come, had, on March 9th, voted §.50,000,000 for 
military and naval preparations. On April 11th President McKinley sent a 
message to Congress reconmieuding that he be authorised to interfere forciblj' in 
Cuba, without at the time recognizing tlie independence of the insurgent gov- 
ernment. The result was the passage by Congress of a resolution declaring Cuba 
to be free, demanding the relinquishment by Spain of its authority on the island, 
and directing the President to call out the militia, and use the land and naval 
forces of the United States to enforce the will of the Uniteil States, l)ut disclaim- 
ing any intention of annexing Cuba. Meantime Spain had made an ineffective 
appeal to the European powers to use their influence in its beiialf. On April 20th 
an ultimatum was cabled by President McKinley. demanding that before noon 
on April 2:ird Spain should relinciuisii its authority and government in tlie island 
of Cuba and withdraw its lan<l and naval forces from Cuban waters. Senor 
Polo y Bernabe, the Spanish minister, requested his passports, and came to 

4 



82 THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 



Canada. Gen. Woodford, the U.S. ambassador to Madrid, was informed that 
diplomatic relations between the two countries had ceased, and withdrew to 
France. United States interests in Spain were confided to the care of the British 
embassy, while the French minister looked after Spanish interests in the United 
States. A bill declai-ing war to exist with Spain was passed by the United States 
Congress, and Mr. .John Sherman, secretary for war, resigned. 

The following gives the leading events of the struggle : 

April 21— President McKinley orders blockade of Havana and Eastern Cuban 
ports. 

April 23— President McKinley calls for 125,000 volunteers. 

April 27— First action of war. "New York," "Puritan" and "Cincinnati" 
bombard Matanzas. Spanish report says one mule was killed. 

May 1— Admiral Dewey, in command of squadron, including " Olympia," 
"Baltimore," "Raleigh," "Concord," "Boston," "Petrel" and "Hugh McCul- 
loch " enter Manila Bay and attack Spanish squadron under Admiral Monto.jo. 
The latter's flag ship, the cruiser " Reina Regente," was set on fire and sunk, and 
the rest of the Spanish vessels, ten in number, were either burned or sunk. The 
Spanish lost two ship's commanders and some 700 men. The United States loss 
was six men wounded. The land batteries at Cavite wei-e also attacked and 
silenced. 

May 4— Cuban Parliament inaugurated at Havana. This Parliament had 
been granted by Spain as a concession to the autonomists, and partly in the hope 
of satisfying United States opinion. Its powers were defined on lines somewhat 
similar to those laid down for Canada in the B. N. A. Act. 

May 11— United States ships "Wilmington," "Hudson" and " Winslow '" 
attack Cardenas; " Winslow " disabled, and Ensign Worth Badgley and four 
sailors killed. 

May 12— Admiral Samson's fleet bombards San Juan, Porto Rico, for three 
hours, doing considerable damage ; U. S. loss, two killed and seven wounded. 

May 19— Admiral Cervera, with Spanish " Cape Verde Squadron," reported at 
Santiago. 

May 25 — President McKinley issues a proclamation calling for 75,000 more 
volunteers, bringing authorised strength of army up to 278,500 men. 

May 26— Battleship " Oregon " arrives at Key West, after voyage of 12,000 
miles from San Francisco. 

May 29— Torpedo boats " Pluton " and " Furor " attack United States block- 
ading force off Santiago, but do no harm. 

May 31 — United States blockading fleet opens fire on Spanish forts at mouth 
of Santiago Bay. 

June 1 — Admiral Samson arrives off Santiago and relieves Commodore Schley 
of the command of the blockading force. 

June 3— Lieutenant Richmond Pierson Hobson and six men run coal steamer 
"Merrimac" into entrance to Santiago Bay and sink it, in order to block the 
channel. All fall into Spanish hands, and are later exchanged. 

June 4— Letter stolen from Lieutenant Carranza's house in Montreal, pub- 
lished, indicating existence of Spanish spy system in Canada. Sir Wilfrid 
Laurier later directs Lieutenant Carranza and Don Juan du Bosc, ex-secretary 
of Spanish legation at AVashington, to quit Canada. 



THE PEOPLES ALMANAC Si 

June 6— Spanish ship " Reina Mercedes " sunk in Santiago Bay during bom- 
bardment by United States fleet. Bomliardment of forts about Santiago is con- 
tinued almost daily. 

June 10— Si.x hundred United States marines landed at Guantanama, near 
Santiago, and have sharp engagement with Spanish troops, but maintain their 
ground. 

June IS— Military expedition sails from Tampa to attack Santiago. Major- 
General Shaffer commands ; total of expedition 77:i ollicers and 14,. 5(54 men. 

Special war revenue bill signed by President McKinley. 

United States Secretary of the Treasury asks popular subscriptions for ^200,- 
Ot»U,(XX) bonds to carry on the war. The amount asked is many times over sub- 
scribed. 

June 20— General Shafter with first section of military expedition arrives at 
Santiago, and later aflect a landing near Baiquira under cover of fire from the 
ships. 

June 21— Guam, Ladrone Islands, occupied by General Anderson on cruiser 
Charleston, bound for Manilla. 

June 24— Fighting takes place between 1st and 10th Cavalry and Colone 
Wood's (Roosevelt's) volunteer regiment and Spaniards at La Guasima, near 
Sevilla. Spaniards retire. Captain A. C. Capron and Sergeant Hamilton Fish, of 
New York, were among the killed. Savilla is later occupied. Total L'nited 
States loss 16 killed, 52 wounded ; total engaged, 9(54. 

June 27— Commodore John C. Watson assigned to conmiand of a squadron 
consisting of the war ships " NeAvark," "Iowa," "Oregon," " Yosemit«," 
" Yankee," " Dixie," and colliers " Scindia," " Abarenda " and "Alexander." The 
announced purpose was to proceed to Europe to compel the recall by Spain of a 
squadron of warships under Admiral Camara, reported to be destined for the 
Philippines. After passing through the Suez Canal Admiral Camara was re- 
called, and Commodore Watson's squadron did not sail for Europe. 

June 2S— President McKinley issues a proclamation declaring a blockade of 
the whole Cuban coast. 

June 29— Major-General Merritt sails from San Francisco to take command 
of military forces sent to aid Admiral Dewey in capturing Manila, and to act as 
governor of the Philippines held by United States forces. 

July 1 — El Caney and San Juan, on heights commanding San Juan, carried 
by United States troops after a severe and prolonged engagement. Generals 
Lawton, Chaffee and Wheeler were prominent in the advance. 

Aguinaldo proclaims himself president of revolutionary republic ot the 
Philippines. 

July 2— Spaniards make efTorts to retake San Juan ; (ieneral Linares, their 
commander, wounded, and General Vera del Key and several of his staff killed ; 
United States batteries throw shells into Santiago. I'nited States loss for two 
days, 33.T killed and 12.52 wounded. 

July 3— General Shafter informs General Toral. on whom command of 
Spanish troops had fallen, that unless he surrenders, Santiago would be bom- 
barded. (Jeneral Toral replies that city will not surrender. General Shafter, to 
allow of removal of women and children and foreign residents, postpones bom- 
bardment till 5th. 

Admiral Cervera's fleet, cruisers " Cristobal Colon," " Infanta Maria Teresa, " 
"Oquendo" and " Viscaya, " with torpedo boats "Furor" and " Pluton," pass 



84 THE PEOPLE'S ALMANAC 



out of Santiago Bay and are attacked by vessels of blockading fleet, and all sunk 
or driven ashore. Admiral Cervera and 1,300 men taken prisoners and some 300 
Spaniards killed. United States loss, one killed and two wounded. Admiral 
Cervera was reported as saying that his action was the result of orders from 
Madrid. 

July 4— Admiral Dewey reports landing of United States troops, despatched 
from San Francisco, at Cavite, on Manila Bay. 

July 5— Demand for surrender of Santiago repeated by General Shafter, and 
again rejected ; truce extended. 

July 7 — General Toral offers to evacuate Santiago if allowed to depart un- 
molested with troops, arms and banners. This offer rejected ('July 10th) by order 
of President McKinley, and city again bombarded from both land and water. 
Ships' shells generally fall short. Spanish reply to Are was weak. General 
Shaffer's effective forces estimated at 22,500 men. Bombardment was continued 
on 11th, and town of Caimanes, north of Santiago, occupied. 

President McKinley signs resolution annexing Hawaii. 

Ships " Raleigh " and " Concord " capture Subig Bay, Philippine Islands, and 
1,300 prisoners, after Philippine insurgents had reported that the German 
cruiser " Irene " had prevented them from attacking the Spaniards. The " Irene "' 
returned on arrival of United States ships, having on board some Spanish 
refugees. 

July 12— United States lines completely surround the city of Santiago. Span- 
ish troops suffering from lack of food; many inhabitants dead. General Toral 
again refuses to unconditionally surrender. Yellow fever appears among United 
States troops. 

July 14— General Toral surrenders city and troops of division of Santiago, 
after interview with General Miles, who had gone to the front, and Generas 
Shafter. Capitulation includes most of the province of Santiago, except townl 
of Holquin and Manzanillo, and provides that the Spanish troops— about 24,000 
men, 10,000 in Santiago— shall be returned to Spain at United States expense. 

July 17 — United States flag hoisted over Santiago, and Spanish troops march 
out. 

July 21— Town of Nipe, Cuba, bombarded, and gunboat "Jorge Juan" de- 
stroyed. 

July 25— United States troops under General Miles land at Porto Guanica, 
near Ponce, Porto Rico, after slight skirmish. 

July 26— M. Jules Cambon, French ambassador at Washington, at request of 
Spain, opens negotiations looking 1o arrangement of peace. 

July 27— General Shafter reports 4,122 of his force sick ; sickness increases, 
and, later, (August 3) causes commanding officers to sign a round robin demand- 
ing the withdrawal of their men from their unhealthy siluation to a point on the 
northern sea coast of the United States, concluding, " The army must be moved 
at once or perish." 

July 28 — Ponce, Porto Rico, surrenders on demand of Captain Higginson of 
the Massachusetts, in command of five ships; troops enter city and are warmly 
received by the people ; Spanish troops retire. 

July 29— General Garcia, of Cuban army, withdraws from Santiago, on 
account of not being placed in command of the city. 



THE PEOPLES ALMANAC 



August 3— Secretary of war makes a statement in regard to bad treatment of 
invalided men on transports, ascribing it to "unforeseen circumstances." 

August 10— Slvirmish near Ilormigueros, Porto Kico ; United States loss, 1 
killed, 16 wounded. 

August 12— M. Cambon signs peace protocol on behalf of Spain. It provides, 

1. Spain shall relinquish all claim of sovereignty over and title to Cuba. 

2. Porto Rico and other Spanish Islands in the West Indies, and an island in 
the Ladrones shall be ceded to the United States. 

3. The United States will occupy and hold the city, bay and harbor of Manila, 
pending the conclusion of a treaty of peace, which shall determine the control, 
disposition and government of the Philippines. 

4. Cuba, Porto Rico, and other Spanish islands in the West Indies shall be 
immediately evacuated, commissioners to meet in Havana and San Juan to 
arrange details. 

5. The United States and Spain shall appoint each, not more than five com- 
missioners, to meet at Paris not later than October 1st, to conclude a treaty of 
peace. 

6. On the signing of the protocol hostilities shall cease. 

Some unimportant skirmishes followed this, previous to the receipt of news 
by the troops. 

August 13 — Manila surrenders to Admiral Dewey after bombaidment and 
storming of the trenches by the army under command of General Meirit: al)out 
7,000 prisoners. City had, on August 7th, refused to surrender to the Admiral and 
General. General Augustin, the Spanish governor, quitted the city on " Kaiserin 
Augusta," German cruiser. 

September 9— United States peace commissioners named : Senators Gray, 
Frye, Davis, and Messrs. Wm. R. Day, and Whitelaw Reid ; Spanish commi.s- 
sioners are Senors Montero Rios, Abarzuza, Garnica and Villarrutia and General 
Cerero. 

Commission at Paris (November 28) settles that Spain shall relinquish Cuba, 
cede Porto Rico, Guam and the Philippines to the United States, and receive a 
cash payment of $20,000,000. Treaty signed December 10. 

September 10 — President McKinley names a commission to investigate the 
conduct of the war department, as a result of the complaints of bad manage- 
ment, especially in the medical and supply departments, commission consists of 
Generals Grenville M. Dodge (chairman), Alex. McD. McCook, and John M. 
Wilson, Messrs. Urban A. Woodbury and James A. Beaver, Colonels J. A. 
Sexton and Charles Denby, Captain Evan P. Howell and Di". Phineas S. Conner. 

October 18— United States flag hoisted at San Juan and Porto Rico formally 
taken over by United States. 

On October 8th a statement was issued giving the United States losses during 
the war as follows : — In the navy 17 killed and 84 injured. 
In the army. 

In Porto Rico— Oflicers. Men. 

Killed None 3 

Wounded 4 26 

In Manila — 

Killed None 15 

Wounded 10 88 

In Cuba — 

Killed 23 237 

Wounded 99 1,3:^2 

Deaths from various causes were : 

From wounds received ... 9 82 

From accidents None 30 

From disease, etc "') 2,liiO 



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NECROLOGY OF 1898. 



Gen. Sir Henry Havelock-Allan 

(1897) Dec. 29 

liev. Wm. Burns, Knox College, 

Toronto Jan. 2 

S. C. Stevenson, Montreal " 2 

Maj.-Gen. Yeatman-Biggs " 4 

Ernest Heart, editor British 

Medical Junnuil " 9 

Dean Henry George Liddell " 19 

Lt.-Gen. Sir Fred. Middleton. . " 25 

.John Laird, siiiphuilder " 25 

Gen. Sir Daniel Lysons " 29 

Dr. Jean H. Gamier, naturalist Feb. 5 

Hon. Wilfrid Prevost, M.L.C.. " 15 
Frances Wiiiard, \V. C. T. U. 

President " 18 

S. F. Perry,M.P " 24 

Archbishop Cleary. Kingston . "24 

Lady Cartier, wid. Sir George E. " 27 
Theo. Davie, Cliief .Justice B.C. Mar. 7 

George MuUer, phihinthropist. . "' 10 

Gen. Rosecrans, U.S. Army. .. . " 11 

Flavien Dupont, M-P '. " 12 

Sir Richard Quain,M.D " 13 

Sir Henry Bes.senier, inventor.. " 15 

Aubrey Beardsley, artist " 16 

Louis iP. Kribs, journalist "' 24 

James Payne, noveli-st " 25 

Anton Seidl, musician " 28 

Arthur Orton, Tichburne claim- 
ant April 1 

Margaret Mather, actress " 7 

Cardinal Taschereau " 12 

George Parsons Lathrop, writer " 19 

X. Ollivier, M.L.A., Levis May 2 

Dalton WcCarthy. M.P " 11 

Ed. Remenvi, violinist " 15 

William E.' Gladstone. . .■ " 19 

Edward Bellamy, author "22 

Sir John T. Gilbert, historian. . " 23 

Sir C. F. Dyke Acland " 29 

Lord Lyon Playfair " 29 

Thomas R. Keene, actor June 1 

Samuel Plim.soll, the "Sailors' 

Friend'" " 3 

Sir J. A. Chapleau " 13 

Sir Ed. Burne-Jones, painter. . . " 17 

Senator Pierre DeBlois " 21 

Cornelius Herz, Panama Canal 

operator July fi 

T']liz. J^ynn Lynton, Tiovellist. . . "" 14 

Bishop Letlechc, Three Rivers.. " 14 
Admiral Massie, "Father of 

the Navy" " 20 

Evan McCoU, Scottish poet .... "24 
Lieut. -Col. Arch. McEachren, 

C.M.G " 24 

Otto Von Bismarck " 30 

Archbishop Walsh, Toronto... . " 30 

.John Caird, D.D., Glasgow " 30 

Jean Louis Gamier, French 

architect Aug. 4 

James Hall, N. Y. state geolo- 
gist " 7 

George E'^erts, Egyptologist. ... " 7 



W. Ramsden, Britisli consul at 
Santiago Aug. 9 

Lieut. -Col. Houghton, ex-M. P.. " 13 

Gen. TciiernieH", Russia " 17 

Sir ('asimir (jZfjwski.. " 21! 

Wilford Woodruff, Mormon 
president Sept. 3 

Elizabeth, Empress of Austria.. " 10 

Rev. John Hall, l).D.,New York " 17 

Varina Ann, daughter of "JefT' 

Davis " IS 

Sir George Grey, colonial states- 
man . " 19 

Robert Hamilton, Quebec *" 19 

M. C. Cameron, Lt.-Gov. X. W. 
Territories " 20 

Fanny Davenport, actress "20 

Sir John Allen, ex-Chief Justice, 
N.B ■ " 27 

Thomas F. Bayard, U.S. states- 
man.. " 28 

Q>ieen Louise, of Denmark " 29 

William Kingsford, (Canadian 
historian " 29 

Ed. J. Henley, actor Oct. 10 

'Wm. Cochrane, Dl).. Braiitford '" 17 

Harold Frederick, U.S. journal- 
ist " 19 

Col. George E. Waring, U.S. 

engineer " 29 

T. B. Potter, founder of the 

Cobden Club Nov. 7 

Lieut. -Col. Van. Straubenzie, 

Kingston " 8 

Hon. Thomas Wood. M.L.C.... " 13 

Mrs. Margaret Davis, St. 
Catharines, reported 110 years 
8 months and 10 days old " 14 

John W. Keeley, inventor of 

Keeley motor " 18 

Herman H. Meier, founder of 
Xorth German Llovd Steamer 
Line ." " IS 

Sir GRorge S, Baden - Powell, 

British Statesman " 20 

Sir John Fowler, British Engi- 
neer " 21 

Col. C. E. Panet, Deputy Minis- 
ter of Militia " 22 

Robert Thompson, Hamilton, 

merchant Deit. 7 

William Black, novelist " 10 

Theodore Viau, Montreal, mer- 
chant " 10 

Gen. Calixto Garcia, Cuban 

leader " 11 

Sir Wm. Anderson, director 

Royal Ordnance factories ... " 12 

Sir Thomas I'pington, Cape 
Colony statesman '* 12 

Sir Wm. Jenner, physician to 

the Queen " VI 

Baron de Longueuil " 13 

Baron Ferdinand Rothschild.. ' 17 



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